College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in History


This page was created at 9:09 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in History
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTORY

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for History.


HISTORY 400. Problems in Greek History I.

Section 001 The Reception of Ancient Greece

Instructor(s): Beate D Dignas (bdignas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The ancient Greeks what are they to us? So remote and so modern... This course offers an introduction to ancient Greece by looking at its reception and relevance in our own world. Modern examples taken from art, drama, film, literature, politics and everyday life will be examined carefully: Antigone and Medea in modern theatre productions, Oedipus in psychoanalysis, classical motifs in contemporary art, the works of Aphrodite and Platonic love, an oath of Hippocrates, Olympic games and democratic constitutions familiar and less familiar symbols and ideas that go back to ancient Greece. What is their precise origin, why have particular themes "survived" for 2,500 years, and how "real" is their meaning today? What made Greek myths and ideas so powerful that they inspired western civilization as a whole? How have our received ideas and images of ancient Greece colored our understanding of ancient evidence? Participants will observe and discuss how imitation and transformation, uncritical adulation as well as ideological rejection shaped and shape our views.

Previous knowledge about ancient Greece is not required, everybody is welcome. Participants will be asked to participate in class discussions and prepare these thoroughly by reading the textbook and course pack material. There will be a midterm paper and a final exam.

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HISTORY 409. Byzantine Empire, 867-1453.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey taking the Byzantine Empire from the accession of the Macedonians till the Empire's fall to the Ottomans. The course focuses on both internal political history and foreign affairs (relations with the West; the great Church split between Rome and Constantinople; relations with Crusaders and with Slavic neighbors Russians, Bulgarians, and Serbs, relations with the Seljuk and Ottoman Turks). The main texts are: Ostrogorsky's History of the Byzantine State, and Jenkins' Byzantium: The Imperial Centuries; and for the final two centuries, Nichol's The Last Centuries of Byzantium. Flexible requirements: Besides the final examination, various options exist: (1) a short paper and hour exam; (2) a longer paper and no hour exam.

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HISTORY 412/MEMS 414. Social and Intellectual History of the Florentine Renaissance.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Diane Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How did a medieval city of bankers and cloth merchants become, in the fifteenth century, the center of an original humanist culture that offered Europeans new ways of seeing and portraying themselves and their society from artistic perspective to the writing of history? The course will trace the history of renaissance Florence not only as a chronicle of its development but also as the process by which it self-consciously constituted itself as a society and a history. Among the topics taken up will be the reshaping of the city, both physically and constitutionally; the transformation of the Medici from bankers to humanist rulers; the development of humanism into an enabling code for civil life; the new valuation of wealth and the civic use of magnificence (from palaces to wedding and funeral processions); social organization and changing attitudes toward the disempowered (slaves, Jews, the poor, women); and forms of religious expression, from confronternal devotions and processions to the fire and brimstone of prophetic preachers (e.g., Savonarola). Considerable use will be made of original sources (historical, literary, and visual). This is designed as a lecture course, but there will be ample time allotted for discussion.

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HISTORY 431. History of the Balkans Since 1878.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a lecture course which surveys the history of the modern Balkans the area which consists of the ex-Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Greece, and Albania from roughly 1878 to the present. There are no prerequisites nor required background. Interested first-year students should feel welcome. Grading is based on: one hour exam, a one-hour written exam, writing on one essay question out of about four, one course paper (approximately 15 pages, topic according to student interest but cleared with instructor), and a written final exam (two essay questions to be chosen from a list of about eight questions). Major issues to be covered are: the crisis of 1875-78 with international involvement ending with the Treaty of Berlin, Croatia and Bosnia under the Habsburgs, the development of Bulgaria after 1878, the Macedonia problem, terrorist societies, World War I, the formation of Yugoslavia, nationality problems in Yugoslavia between the Wars, German penetration and the rise of dictatorships in the inter-war Balkans, World War II with Yugoslav and Greek resistance movements (including the Greek Civil War), Tito's Yugoslavia, its 1948 break with the USSR and Yugoslavia's special path to socialism. Nationality problems, the break-up of Yugoslavia, and the ensuing wars.

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HISTORY 432. Medieval and Early Modern Russia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Valerie Ann Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Since medieval times, Westerners have brought back tales of exoticism and barbarism from Russia to their homelands, but few have taken the time to understand the nature of Russian society and culture. This course attempts to examine early Russian society in its own terms, while also studying the historiographic tradition and the issues at stake for the various historians of the field. The course spans the history of Russia from the ninth century, when written records begin, to Peter the Great at the end of the seventeenth century. Topics include the formation of the Russian state, the conversion to Orthodox Christianity, the invasion of the Mongol horde, and the reign of Ivan the Terrible. The course emphasizes interpretive issues, historiographic debates and questions of historical method. Class sessions will combine lecture and discussion. Students will be evaluated on the basis of two short papers (5-7 pages), a midterm and a final exam. There are no prerequisites.

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HISTORY 434. History of the Soviet Union.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Serhy Yekelchyk (serhy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

With the collapse of the Soviet Union and the emergence of fifteen independent republics, the experience of Communism in Russia and Eastern Europe is being rethought as if the seeds of destruction had been planted already in the revolution. This course looks at the complex evolution of political structures, social developments, and cultural responses during the 70 years of the Soviet system. Beginning with the prerevolutionary crises and political movements, it surveys the rise of Stalin, the building of a "totalitarian" state, and the successive reforms that ultimately unraveled the system. Students are required to attend two lectures and one discussion section each week, prepare a term project, and take two take-home examinations (midterm and final).

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HISTORY 438. Eastern Europe from 1500 to 1900.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian A Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey the history of Eastern Europe up to 1900, concentrating on the lands now included within Poland, Lithuania, Ukraine, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. We will explore the development and collapse of a political and social system marked by both unparalleled liberties for the nobility and crushing oppression for the peasantry. East European history has been shaped by the interactions of two great religions Christianity and Judaism and we will discover some of the rich diversity within each tradition. In this course we will see how the cultural and ethnic divisions of the region took shape over the centuries, and how the sometimes violent, sometimes creative force of nationalism assumed its modern form. By looking at a region which always sat precariously on the boundaries of that elusive concept called "Europe," we will critically examine the questions of economic and social underdevelopment which remain so important in our own day.

Textbook List: Piotr Wandycz, The Price of Freedom: A History of East-Central Europe from the Middle Ages to the Present (New York: Routledge, 1993).

Daniel Chirot, ed., The Origins of Backwardness in Eastern Europe: Economics and Politics from the Middle Ages Until the Early Twentieth Century (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989).

Anthony Polonsky, ed., From Shtetl to Socialism (Oxford: The Littman Library of Jewish Civilization).

Paula Sutter Fichtner, ed., The Habsburg Empire: From Dynasticism to Multinationalism (Malabar, Florida: Krieger Publishing Company, 1997).

Krystyna Olszer, For Your Freedom and Ours: Polish Progressive Spirit from the 14th Century to the Present (New York: F. Ungar Publishing Company, 1981).

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HISTORY 443/AAPTIS 487. Modern Middle East History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juan R Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syl/syl443.htm

This lecture course surveys the emergence of the modern Middle East from the three great Muslim empires of the early modern period, the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal. It discusses both indigenous developments and the Western impact in the nineteenth century, looking at reform bureaucracy and millenarian movements as responses to these changes. We then examine the rise of nationalism and the break-up of the Ottoman Empire during and after WW I, and these phenomena are seen as the context or the beginnings of the Palestine issue. Attention is paid to the interwar efforts at building strong states in the region, whether in the Turkey of Ataturk, the Iran of Reza Shah, or Wafdist Egypt. The last part of the course looks at the rise of socialist and pan-Arab ideologies, as well as of opposing ideologies such as Islamic activism after WW II. The impact of petroleum, the Palestinian issue, the turn toward bourgeois liberalism, and Shi'ite movements such as the Iranian Revolution and the Hizbullah phenomenon in Lebanon, and the Gulf War of 1991, will all be addressed in this section. Students will take a midterm and a final examination, and will write a ten-page term paper on a subject of their choosing. Reading in this course comes to about 150 pages per week.

Required texts: (Available at Shaman Drum, 313 S. State St., tel. 662-7407, and at Reserve Reading Room, 3rd Floor, Shapiro Undergraduate Library):

  • Daniel, Elton L. The History of Iran. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 2000.
  • Kahlil Gibran. Broken Wings. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1999.
  • Nageeb Mahfouz. Midaq Alley. Trans. Trevor LeGassick. New York: Anchor Books, 1992.
  • Afaf Lutfi al-Sayyid Marsot. A Short History of Modern Egypt. Cambridge Univ. Press, 1985.
  • Milton-Edwards, Beverley. Contemporary politics in the Middle East. Malden, MA : Blackwell Publishers, 2000.
  • Charles C. Smith. Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict. St. Martin's, 3nd edition, 1997.
  • Erik J. Zurcher. Turkey: A Modern History. New York: I.B. Tauris/ St. Martin's, 1998.
  • A short course pack will be available at: Accucopy

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 448/AAS 448. Africa Since 1850.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Mamadou Diouf (mdiouf@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: AAS 200 recommended. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is a survey of modern African history. It covers particularly the colonial period and will include close looks at particular topics and reading and discussion of novels and original documents, as well as of historical scholarship. This format will allow for combinations of lecture and discussion during each session.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

    Section 001 MODERN SOUTHEAST ASIA II: 1942-2000.

    Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrazek (rdlf@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The major themes of this course will be late-colonialism, nationalism, and modernization of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Siam/Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Burma) a historical conflict between the societies of the region and the global community of "developed" nations. Political, social and intellectual history will be studied but, first of all, the course wants to be an introduction to a sensitive and well-informed reading of a broadest variety of historical sources. Individual students' interest in particular region will be fully supported.

    There will be a midterm examination and a final. In addition, each student will be required to write a research paper of about 15 pages on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. The paper's topic may focus on a single country or region, or it may be comparative; use of primary sources will be especially encouraged. The primary sources may include chronicles or codes of law, travel accounts, newspapers, government documents and reports, short stories, films, novels and/or poetry. There are ample translations available, thus a knowledge of regional languages is not required.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 461. The American Revolution.

    U.S. History

    Section 005.

    Instructor(s): David J Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    An intensive course on the background to the Revolution, its progress, and the changes it wrought in American life. Emphasis on America's mid-18th-century socioeconomic transformation, Britain's reorganization of her empire in the 1760s and 1770s, colonial opposition, and the emergence of a uniquely American ideology. Subsequent topics include the progress and disclocations of the military conflict, the attempt at confederation, and the culmination of the Revolutionary movement in the iteration and early development of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

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    HISTORY 463. The Origins of the American Civil War, 1830-1860.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course attempts to understand the causes of the American Civil War. It begins with a description of the society of the ante-bellum South; turns next to a portrait of Jacksonian politics and political ideology; then takes up that transmutation of Jacksonian ideals in the 1840's and 1850's through which hostile sectional stereotypes were defined. It culminates with an exploration of the sense in which the intellectual, social, religious, and economic conflicts in America came to be summarized by the slavery question during the period, because of the demands of political competition. There will be a midterm exam, a research paper of ten pages, and a two-hour final examination. Reading will average about 250 pages a week. Enrollment will be limited to forty students, in order to facilitate class discussion.

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    HISTORY 467. The United States Since 1933.

    U.S. History

    Section 011.

    Instructor(s): Sidney Fine (sidneyf@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The course provides a comprehensive view of American history and of life in America from the Great Depression to the present day. Among the subjects treated are the New Deal; World War II; the Cold War; McCarthy and McCarthyism; the Fair Deal; the New Frontier; the Great Society; the turbulence of the 1960's (the Black revolt and Black power, the counterculture and youth revolt, the new feminism and women's liberation); the war in Vietnam; Nixon and the Watergate affair; the 1980s and the Reagan presidency; and the presidencies of Bush and Clinton. Several paperbacks are assigned for the course, but no textbook is used. There is a midterm and a final examination in the course, and a paper is required.

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    HISTORY 477. Latin America: The National Period.

    Section 005.

    Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course examines the history of Latin America from the early nineteenth century until the present. The approach is chronological and thematic. A temporal narrative will be organized around these themes: (1) state formation, including forms of political rule and the construction of collective identities at local, national, and continental levels; (2) elite and popular relations, including cases of rebellion, revolution, and state repression; and (3) forms of capitalist development and transformations in class relations, ideologies of economic development, and center-periphery linkages. The discussion of individual countries and of specific topics will be intertwined throughout the course. Classes will combine lecture and discussions. Students are required to read the assigned materials BEFORE each class and are encouraged to participate in class discussions. Written work will involve a short essay, a longer paper, a midterm, and a final. Readings will include relevant sections from a textbook, and articles, monographs, novels, short stories, newspapers and films, some of which will be selected in response to class discussion and students' interests.

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    HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

    Section 001 Race and Citizenship in Comparative Perspective: The United States and Cuba, 1865-1965

    Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu), Richard H Pildes

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This seminar explores the relationship of law and society during a process of radical political and social transformation: the end of slavery and the redefining of the boundaries of race and citizenship. In the United States, male former slaves became full political participants for the brief period of Reconstruction, but massive retrenchment followed and by the early 20th century, African Americans had been virtually eliminated from Southern electoral politics. In Cuba, by contrast, shortly after slavery was abolished a large-scale cross-racial nationalist movement emerged whose legacy was a strong claim to citizenship by Afro-Cuban veterans, a claim that led to the incorporation of a guarantee of universal manhood suffrage in the Cuban Constitution of 1901. Thus at the same moment that black disfranchisement in much of the South was allowed to stand by the U.S. Supreme Court, cross-racial enfranchisement was written into the Cuban Constitution. The subsequent histories of voting and political participation in both societies were framed within this contrast, through the period of the Cuban revolution of 1959 and the U.S. Voting Rights Act of 1965.

    In exploring these contrasting histories, we will read key legal cases, historical testimony, and secondary accounts, paying attention to the interplay of law, electoral politics, and other forms of collective action. The seminar will meet once a week for two hours, and will be open to law students, advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Professor Scott is a faculty member in the Department of History and a specialist on post-emancipation societies in Latin America and the United States; Professor Pildes is a faculty member in the Law School and a specialist on race, law and electoral systems. Law students will receive 2 credits for this seminar; LSA undergraduates will participate in an extra one-hour discussion section and will receive 3 credits. Admission is by permission of the instructor, via email to rjscott@umich.edu.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

    Section 001 The Caucasus Since the Fall of the Soviet Union.

    Instructor(s): Gerard Libaridian

    Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will explore the challenges Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia have faced since becoming independent states a decade ago, as individual countries and as a region. The lectures and readings will cover the course these republics have charted for their political and economic transformation, the conflicts (Nagorno Karabagh, Abkhazia, South Ossetia) that have marred their development, their difficult relations with their stronger neighbors (Russia, Turkey, Iran), their path of integration in the international community, as well as the relationship between their domestic politics and their foreign and security policies.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 491/Econ. 491. The History of the American Economy.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Warren C Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ. 101 or 102. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/econ/491/001.nsf

    See Economics 491.001.

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    HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

    Section 001 Lost in Cyberspace: Chapters in the History of the Book.

    Instructor(s): Oz Frankel (ofrankel@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This seminar takes as its starting point the current hype over "New Media" and the collateral prophesies regarding the imminent death of the book, and proceeds to examine essential features of (and key episodes in) the history of the book, print and reading in modern Europe and the US. Since the invention of the printing press in the 15th century, books and print culture have been central to the shaping of western culture and society. Nevertheless, only recently have scholars begun to explore critically and historically this crucial facet of modern life.

    The seminar follows the role print and books had in the emergence of the modern "market place" and "public sphere," and, alternatively, their employment as tools of transformation during periods of social and political strife (for instance, the French Revolution). The material aspect of book production, their design as artifacts, and their dissemination will be also investigated. Case studies from both sides of the Atlantic will include the business of street pamphleteers in 18th century Paris, the reading practices of handbills and banknotes in 19th century NYC, and the 20th century "Book of the Month Club." Other themes under consideration will be the rise of authorship as a profession, the relationship between books and their readers, publishing and state authority, and the effects of Western based print culture on other lands. Finally, we will try to assess the durability and vulnerability of books, print and "information" in the virtual spaces of the new technologies of communication.

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    HISTORY 517. History of Ireland Since 1603.

    British History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Benjamin Zvi Novick

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A narrative history of modern Ireland from the time of the collapse of Gaelic culture at the Tudor conquest until the present. Lectures will treat aspects of economic, cultural, and social as well as political history. Course work will include a sequence of periodic brief quizzes, one term paper, a final examination. There is no course prerequisite and no prior knowledge of Ireland is required.

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    HISTORY 523. France, 1661-1789.

    Section 001 The Old Regime and Enlightenment.

    Instructor(s): Dena Goodman (goodmand@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/history/523/001.nsf

    Through readings in both seventeenth- and eighteenth-century texts, as well as recent historical works, this course examines the French Enlightenment in its relationship to the political culture of France, from the accession of Louis XIV to (but not including) the French Revolution. The format of the course combines formal lectures with substantial discussion of primary texts. Primary source readings include the theorist of absolutism, Bossuet, aristocratic writers Saint-Simon and Sévigné, and Enlightenment figures Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Graffigny, Mercier, and Raynal.

    Questions we will explore include:

    • How was the Enlightenment situated in relation to the broader culture and institutions of Old Regime France?

    • What were the objects and shape of Enlightenment critique? How did the Enlightenment respond to the political culture and questions of its day?

    • Who participated in the Enlightenment and what were the social and intellectual practices in which they engaged?

    • What roles did women play in the Old Regime and Enlightenment? How were issues of gender addressed?

    Texts Available at Shaman Drum, course pack available at Dollar Bill. Book List: Title: The Ancient Regime Author: Behrens ISBN: 0-393-95801-9 Publisher: Norton Required: required Desk Copies: Notes: Title: Panorama of Paris Author: Mercier ISBN: 0-271-01931-X Publisher: Penn State Required: required Desk Copies: Notes: Title: Persian Letters Author: Montesquieu ISBN: 0872204901 Publisher: Hackett Required: required Desk Copies: Notes: Title: Letters concerning the English Nation Author: Voltaire ISBN: 0192837087 Publisher: Oxford World Classics Required: required Desk Copies: Notes: Title: Letters from a Peruvian Woman Author: Graffigny ISBN: 0-87352-778-X Publisher: MLA Texts & Translations Required: required Desk Copies: Notes: English translation! Title: Discourse on Inequality Author: Rousseau ISBN: 0-19-282947-5 Publisher: Oxford World Classics Required: required Title: Private Lives and Public Affairs Author: Maza, Sarah Publisher: University of California Press Required: required

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    HISTORY 535/Armenian 535. Armenia and the Armenians in the 20th Century.

    Section 001 The South Caucasus Since the Collapse of the USSR

    Instructor(s): Gerard Libaridian

    Prerequisites: Hist. 287 recommended but not required. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will explore the challenges Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia have faced since becoming independent states a decade ago, as individual countries and as a region. The lectures and readings will cover the course these republics have charted for their political and economic transformation, the conflicts (Nagorno Karabagh, Abkhazia, South Ossetia) that have marred their development, their difficult relations with their stronger neighbors (Russia, Turkey, Iran), their path of integration in the international community, as well as the relationship between their domestic politics and their foreign and security policies.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 541/AAPTIS 467/Rel. 467. Shi'ism: The History of Messianism and the Pursuit of Justice in Islamdom.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 467.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 546/AAPTIS 495/WS 471/Rel. 496. Gender and Politics in Early Modern Islam.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Students should preferably have had one course in Islamic Studies. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 495.001.

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    HISTORY 569/LHC 412 (Business Administration). American Business History.

    U.S. History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Rowena Olegario

    Prerequisites: Junior, senior, or graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The origins and development of and growth of business are studied. The course traces the beginnings of business enterprise in Europe and describes business activities during the American colonial, revolutionary, and pre-Civil War periods. It then discusses economic aspects of the Civil War, post-Civil War industrial growth, business consolidation and the antitrust movement, economic aspects of World War I, business conditions during the 1920s, effects of the 1929 depression and the New Deal upon business, economic aspects of World War II, post-war business developments and current business trends.

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    HISTORY 592. Topics in Asian History.

    Section 001 GROUNDING THE FLOATING WORLD OF EARLY MODERN JAPAN: DOCUMENTS IN EARLY MODERN JAPAN. Meets with Asian Studies 491.???

    Instructor(s): Hitomi Tonomura (tomitono@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Upper-class standing. (3). May be elected for credit twice.

    Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Japan's early modern age (1600-1868) often is viewed as a period dominated by oppressive samurai rule, rigid social hierarchy, economic stagnation, national insularity and restrictive Confucian morality. A closer look reveals that urban culture flourished in cities that were the world's largest, that peasants felt the samurai lord's authority only sporadically, and that ideas and goods from outside steadily entered the archipelago. What really went on? We will dig deeply into Japan's early modern age through lectures, discussion, and hands-on reading of documents in English translation and/or original Japanese. The course will bring alive the activities and concerns of women and men of various classes by high- lighting topics such as political authority, sexualities, rural and urban economic development, property relations, literacy, popular and high cultures, status and mobility, and crime and punishment. History 592 incorporates Asian Studies 491, the documents section (meets 8 times from Feb. 5 through March 7), which may be taken independently as a short course. Requirements include (1) class attendance and participation [10%], (2) a five-page paper that analyzes documents [25%], (3) a five-page response to each of the two take-home final exam questions [50%], and (4) occasional in-class "knowledge" based quizzes [15%]. No prerequisites required.

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    HISTORY 603/Anthro. 640. Seminar in Anthropology and History.

    Section 001 Agrarian Questions Peasants, Power, and Transitions To and From Capitalism

    Instructor(s): Sharad Chari (schari@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Cultural Anthropology 640.001.

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    HISTORY 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

    Section 001 Third World Revolutions.

    Instructor(s): Juan R Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Aims at a comparative history of select revolutions in the modern Third World, including the Egyptian Urabi Revolt, the Iranian Constitutional Revolution, the Chinese Revolution, the Algerian Revolution, and the Iranian Islamic Revolution. Works by comparativists such as Theda Skocpol (France, Russia, China) and James Rinehart (China, Mexico and Iran) will be used alongside country studies.

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    HISTORY 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

    Section 002 Anthropology/History Core Seminar. Meets with History 604.002.

    Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu), David Cohen

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Cultural Anthropology 558.001.

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    HISTORY 605. Aspects of Ancient Indian History.

    Section 001 EARLY HISTORIC SOUTH ASIA: HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY. Meets with Anthropology 683.002.

    Instructor(s): Thomas R. Trautmann (ttraut@umich.edu), Carla M. Sinopoli (sinopoli@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/humin/trautmann/course.html

    The course will be co-taught by an historian (Tom Trautmann) and an archaeologist (Carla Sinopoli) and will meet in the Exhibit Museum. It will blend archaeological and historical methods and sources in a close examination of aspects of premodern India. The course will be organized around a number of issues in which archaelogy and history ar entangled: the uses of India's past in current politics; language and race; gender; states and empires; comodities and economies. It would be appropriate for graduate students or advanced undergrads with interests in India, and in the relation between history and archaeology. It can be elected as History 605.001 under Trautmann, or Anthropology 683.002 under Sinopoli.

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    HISTORY 611. The Literature of American History.

    Section 001 The Literature of American History

    Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu) , John S Carson (jscarson@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Juniors or seniors with permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The purpose of this graduate seminar is to introduce first-year graduate students to certain important topics within the monographic literature of American history. It will by no means attempt to be exhaustive, either in terms of chronological or topical coverage. Rather the goal is to concentrate on a few areas that have been and/or now seem of importance within the field and to examine critically a central text helping to define major issues and avenues of research. The format will be as follows: one common text (normally an entire book) per week plus reports by two seminar members each on a different supplemental text. Writing requirements include two short book reviews plus a final substantial bibliographic essay.

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    HISTORY 612/Amer. Cult. 616. Native American History.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Liza Black (lizab@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See American Culture 616.001.

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    HISTORY 618/LACS 618/Anthro. 618 Early Ethnography is South America.

    Section 001 The Incas: Andean and Spanish Ideas About Their History and Social Organization

    Instructor(s): Sabine MacCormack (sgm@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Latin American and Caribbean Studies 618.001.

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    HISTORY 620. Studies in Modern Medicine and Health.

    Section 001 Global Health, Reproductive Medicine, and Biopower. Meets with Women's Studies 698.005.

    Instructor(s): Nancy Rose Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    What happens when we systematically tack back and forth between feminist histories of race, medicine, and science and the literature on global health, development, and reproductive politics? This course aims to find out.

    Foucault's notions of "docile bodies" and "biopower" remain subjects of inquiry and debate within two broad literatures-race, empire, medicine, and science studies; and histories and anthropologies of sex, gender, and reproductive technologies. This graduate colloquium will examine these literatures comparatively and synthetically in relation to (1) their theoretical and historiographical groundings, Foucauldian and otherwise; and (2) the emerging critical literature on global health, development, and reproductive politics in the so-called developing and post-socialist worlds.

    We will read, among others, George Rosen, Laurie Garrett, Thomas Laqueur, Donna Haraway, Nelly Oudshoorn, Naomi Pfeffer, Daniel Pick, Paul Weindling, David Arnold, Gyan Prakash, Margaret Lock, Megan Vaughan, Randall Packard, Jonathan Sadowsky, Waltraud Ernst, Allan Young, Gail Kligman, Marilyn Strathern, and Rayna Rapp. Themes covered will include: the histories of sex, the body, and gender in relation to reproductive medicine; race, science, and degeneration; eugenics, sex hormones, and infertility; modernities and maternities; madness, memory, and trauma; the invention of post-traumatic stress disorder and health and human rights; blood, body parts, and citizenship; race and sickle cell anemia; HIV/AIDs and confessional technologies; kinship and the new reproductive technologies, including fetal diagnostics and surgery, genetic counseling, and genomics.

    We will give particular attention to how global flows and inequities are inscribed in the apparent disjunction between the feminist reproductive science literature (including histories and anthropologies of gynecology, embryology, endocrinology, and new reproductive and genomic technologies) and the postcolonial literature on epidemics, reproductive health, and population politics in former European colonies.

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    HISTORY 621/WS 621. Studies in Women's History.

    Section 001 Gender, Body, and Sexuality in Early Modern and Modern Europe. Meets with German 822.001

    Instructor(s): Kathleen M Canning (kcanning@umich.edu), Helmut Puff

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Upper classmen with permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The study of body, gender, and sexuality has profoundly transformed the historiographical landscape in recent decades. It has become one of the key sites for an ongoing debate on the construction of historical narratives and the materiality of experience, questions of social agency and explorations of discourse. By crossing the usual divide between early modern and modern Europe as well as the boundaries of national history, we will open a space for discussing a wide range of methodological and historical issues surrounding the concepts of body, gender and sexuality in the history and literature of Europe. We will explore the social and the sexual body, the realms of the "domestic" and the "public," the body as a symbol and site of "material" experience, as well as the gendering and embodying of citizenship, nation, state, and empire. Our goal in the course will be to familiarize students with both theoretical and historical texts. Requirements for the course will include class participation, presentations and a final paper. Class size will be limited to fifteen graduate students.

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    HISTORY 621/WS 621. Studies in Women's History.

    Section 002 Doing and Teaching U.S. Women's History, 1550-1900: Primary Texts/Major Readings/Recent Theories and Technologies. Meets with American Culture 699.006.

    Instructor(s): Carol F Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Upper classmen with permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is designed for graduate students who plan to research and teach in the field of U.S. women's history or would like to incorporate women's history scholarship and methodology into their interdisciplinary research and undergraduate teaching. It also devotes some attention to feminist pedagogy. Most weeks, readings include primary texts and key interpretations based on these documents. Remaining class time is devoted to feminist theory, teaching strategies and goals, recent computer-based technologies, and course design. The first class, for example, introduces students to feminist visual culture theory and practice through an examination of changing European and Euro-American representations of "America," three scholarly readings of these images, and a theoretical essay analyzing visual productions of meaning. In the following week, we analyze the surviving documents of a seventeenth-century Virginia court case dealing with gender ambiguity along with several interpretations of this event offered by historians, including a web-generated discussion of the case's usefulness for teaching gender theory to the uninitiated. And so on. The course begins by placing U.S. women's history in the context of European colonization and an emerging Atlantic world and concludes by drawing connections between late nineteenth-century gender constructions and U.S. empire-building in the Pacific. Throughout, our goal will be to assess the most recent trends in the field and how we can best convey their significance in undergraduate classrooms. The class meets each week for two regular discussion hours, with several additional hours of technology training to be arranged.

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    HISTORY 623/Econ. 664. Problems in American Economic History.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites: Economics 401, 402, and 405 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Economics 664.001.

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    HISTORY 624/Amer. Cult. 614. Asian American History.

    Section 001 Asian American History

    Instructor(s): Scott Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See American Culture 614.001.

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    HISTORY 626. Studies in Byzantine History.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    HISTORY 638. Studies in Medieval History.

    Section 001 Ancient & Medieval Numismatics. Meets with Classical Archaeology 633.001.

    Instructor(s): Alan M Stahl (amstahl@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    An introduction to the study of the coinages and monetary history of classical Greece and Rome, the pre-Islamic and Islamic Near East, and medieval and early modern Europe. The course will include a survey of the development of the various coinage traditions and training in the basic methodology of numismatics, including die study, hoard analysis, site find reports, and scientific analytical tools. Special emphasis will be on the relevance of coin evidence to historical, archaeological and art historical investigation. Each student will develop a research project relevant to his or her field of specialization, and will give an oral and written report on findings.

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    HISTORY 647. The Transformation of Identities in Modern Europe.

    Section 001 Race, Empire, and National Identity in Modern Britain. Meets with Women's Studies 698.006.

    Instructor(s): Sonya O Rose (sorose@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    In this course we shall examine key and recent texts that bear upon the changing and Contested constructions of British national identity. In particular, we focus on how race and empire along with gender and class figure into the construction of what it means to be British or English (as the case may be), and how these social differences and political and institutional practices subvert any attempt to define a unitary British identity. The course covers the period from the late eighteenth- century to the post-World War II period. We begin with a examination of the theoretical literature on race and nation, and then move on to considering the relevant historiography. Students will be expected to prepare short weekly essays that discuss the readings, and will complete a paper relevant to both the course topics and to the students' individual research interests.

    There will be a course pack and books will be available at Shaman Drum. Catherine Hall, ed., Cultures of Empire, Routledge 2000 *
    Paul Gilroy, The Black Atlantic (Harvard)
    Craig Calhoun, Nationalism. Minnesota 1997
    Simon Gikandi, Maps of Englishness (Columbia, I think)
    Jonathan Schneer, London, 1900 (Yale, 1999)
    Mrinalini Sinha, Mother India, Michigan 2000*
    Barbara Bush, Imperialism, Race and Resistance, Routledge, 1999 *
    Kathleen Paul, Whitewashing Britain, Cornell.
    Gail Lewis, Race, Gender and Social Welfare, Basil Blackwell, 2000 Isbn 0-7456-2285-2.

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    HISTORY 660. Studies in 16th and 17th Century England.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Michael P MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course provides an introduction to the historiography of early modern Britain (c. 1450-1800). It will include readings on currently hot topics in political, religious, social, economic and cultural history. Most of the readings will concern England, although the coverage of Ireland, Scotland and Wales may be expanded. The balance of topics covered will be adjusted among these various subfields so that it best meets the needs of the students taking the class. Students will be asked to write a historiographical essay on one of the set of topical readings and literature related to it. They should emerge from the course with a good sense of the kind of arguments that have been going on in this field, some acquaintance with the major problems and historians in it and how to pursue other problems in early modern history on their own. The class is intended for students in any field of history or in a related discipline and is not aimed exclusively at those who wish to specialize in early modern British history.

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    HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

    Section 001 INTRODUCTION TO IDEOLOGY. Meets with German 841.001

    Instructor(s): Scott D Spector

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See German 841.001.

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    HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

    Section 002 Race, Gender & Citizenship in the 19th Century U.S. Meets with Women's Studies 698.004 and American Culture 699.002.

    Instructor(s): Hannah R Rosen (hrosen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Women's Studies 698.004.

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    HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

    Section 003 Prosperos, Calibans, Mirandas, and Others: Race and Gender in the New World. Meets with CAAS 558.001, Institute for the Humanities 611.001, and American Culture 699.001.

    Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu), Arlene Rosemary Keizer

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See CAAS 699.001.

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    HISTORY 700. Independent Research Seminar.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course allows faculty to offer required seminar work to graduate students on an individual basis during terms when their regular seminars are not scheduled to be offered.

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    HISTORY 702. Seminar in Ancient History II.

    Section 001 Hellenistic Diplomacy.

    Instructor(s): Beate D Dignas (bdignas@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is a graduate seminar in Ancient History. Evidence that reflects "Hellenistic diplomacy" in the widest sense includes royal letters and edicts as well as civic decrees, honorary texts, building inscriptions and land leases as well as sacred laws and dedications. We will interpret their contribution to our knowledge of the political, religious, social and economic history of the Hellenistic period. One important aim is to introduce students to Greek epigraphy and the work of the epigraphist. How are epigraphic corpora "produced", and how can the ancient historian and archaeologist use them? We will practice the reading and transcription of squeezes and look at the implications of dating, restoration and translation. Particular focus will be given to the language and formulae of royal letters. How do these texts reflect means of control? Are we dealing with topoi rather than a genuine interaction between rulers and subjects? What are the recurring themes that appear in the texts? The seminar will be structured around these themes, e.g., royal administration, religion and ruler cult, royal euergetism, justification of rule, petition and response. The course material is accessible through a variety of interests and proficiencies in Greek. Please email me (bdignas@umich.edu) if you are interested in taking the course.

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    HISTORY 715. Seminar in Early Modern European History.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): A Michael Wintroub (wintroub@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of French or German. Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    HISTORY 719. Seminar in Modern European History.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Geoffrey H Eley (ghe@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    HISTORY 742. Seminar in Balkan History.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

    Prerequisites: "Reading knowledge of French, German, Russian, or a Balkan language." Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    HISTORY 743. Seminar in Russian History.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Jane R Burbank (jburbank@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of Russian. Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The subject of the seminar is political imagination, in the practices and expressions of people living in Russian empires, from the 18th century to the present. This broad topic is intended to encourage the examination of a wide variety of specialized subjects as well as a common conversation about relationships of individuals and groups to the imperial projects of the Imperial Russia, the Soviet Union, the Russian Federation, or to any polity that was formerly part of one of these empires. What value do conventional categories of historical analysis estate, class, identity, colonizer and colonized have for understanding the ways that people thought and acted in their local and other settings? Is it possible to discover subject-derived sensibilities concerning place in the polity? The seminar calls into question typologies created by both imperial elites and scholars, and asks its participants to explore how people in these polities have themselves imagined their individual possibilities and their connections to a larger social world.

    Seminar meetings will be devoted to discussions of selected common readings, techniques of research and writing, interpretations of documents, analysis of work in progress, and reports on research. Participants will be invited to events sponsored by the Russian History Initiative, at which scholarship related to the theme of the course will be discussed. A colloquium for the collective presentation of the seminar's work will be organized during the last week of the academic term. Students will write a short interpretation of a document, a paper prospectus with a bibliography and an annotated list of primary sources, a first draft and a final draft of their research papers, as well as a short evaluation of another student's first draft paper.

    Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Russian or another language of an appropriate empire. Students working on Muscovy or on European and Asian polities contiguous with the various "Russian" empires are welcome in this course, as are students writing chapters of Ph.D. dissertations or M.A. theses.

    For more information, contact Jane Burbank at "jburbank@umich.edu"

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    HISTORY 772/Public Policy 770. Seminar in American Social History.

    Section 001 History & Domestic Policy Making.

    Instructor(s): Maris Vinovskis (vinovski@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: http://www.spp.umich.edu/courses/syllabi/PUBPOL770_W01_Syllabus.htm

    The seminar will focus on how historians have viewed and participated in the policymaking process. Following several more general discussions of history and policymaking, the seminar will analyze how history has been used recently in developing federal policies in education, but efforts will be made to relate those experiences to other areas of policymaking as well.

    Each student will write a 25-45 page paper on some aspect of federal, state, or local policymaking from an historical perspective. The topics should reflect the students own interests and can cover a wide variety of different policy subjects (students certainly can select areas other than education policy if they desire to do so). A preliminary copy of the paper is due March 30, 2001 and class presentation will be on April 2. The final paper is due by 4 p.m. on April 23, 2001.

    Books Available for Purchase

  • Richard E. Neustadt and Ernest R. May, Thinking in Time: The Uses of History for Decision-Makers (New York: Free Press, 1986). [paperback]
  • Maris A. Vinovskis, History and Educational Policymaking (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1999). [hardcover]

    All assigned materials are on reserve at the Undergraduate Reserve Room and are also available for purchase at the Shaman Drum Bookshop.

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    HISTORY 781/AAS 781. Seminar in Black American History.

    Section 001 RESEARCH METHODS AND CONTROVERSIES.

    Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    History/African-American Studies 781 is a research seminar in African- American History. The purpose of the course is to give students the opportunity to explore the craft of historical research, argumentation, and writing, with a particular emphasis on the challenges of uncovering and interpreting the African-American historical experience. Over the course of the academic term, students will produce a substantial research paper, based on primary research, on a subject of the student's choosing. These individual projects will form the core of the seminar, but the class has been designed to encourage collaboration at all stages of the essay writing process. A prospectus/bibliography will be due in February; a first draft of the paper will be due in early April and a final draft at the end of the month.

    During the first month of the academic term, the class will collaborate on 2-3 research exercises based on a current research project on the Underground Railroad that is being sponsored by the UM's Arts of Citizenship Program and the Washtenaw County African-American Historical Museum. During the first month, the class will also read and discuss a small number of monographic and theoretical essays on African-American history drawn from three essential historical anthologies: Raymond D'Angelo (ed.), The American Civil Rights Movement: Readings and Interpretations; Darlene Clark Hine, et al., (eds.), We Specialize in the Wholly Impossible: A Reader in Black Women's History; Frederick Cooper, et al. (eds.), Beyond Slavery: Explorations of Race, Labor and Citizenship in Postemancipation Societies. Each of these anthologies will be available at Shaman Drum Bookshop.

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    HISTORY 786/AAS 786. Seminar in African History.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): David W Cohen (dwcohen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    HISTORY 793/MENAS 695/AAPTIS 793. The Study of the Near East.

    Section 001 The Mapping of Arabia. Meets with Institute for the Humanities 611.002 and AAPTIS 660.001/Hist. 827.001

    Instructor(s): Michael David Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Institute for the Humanities 611.002.

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    HISTORY 795/REES 795/Hist. 795/Pol. Sci. 795/Econ. 795/Geog. 795. Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies.

    Instructor(s): Jane R Burbank (jburbank@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 795.

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    HISTORY 796. Topics in History.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    HISTORY 802. Reading Course.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    HISTORY 804. Reading for the General Examination.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    HISTORY 825/Anthro. 825/Chinese 825/Econ. 825/Pol. Sci. 825/Soc. 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

    Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A course for students working on special research projects in Asian history.

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    HISTORY 827/AAPTIS 660. Seminar in Problems and Methods of Research on Medieval Near East.

    Section 001 The Mapping of Arabia. Meets with Institute for the Humanities 611.002 and MENAS 695.034/Hist. 793.034/AAPTIS 793.034

    Instructor(s): Michael David Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Near East 461. Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Institute for the Humanities 611.002.

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    HISTORY 898. Dissertation Colloquium Candidacy.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    HISTORY 900. Preparation for Preliminary Examinations.

    Prerequisites: Normally to be taken only in the term in which a student plans to take his general preliminary examinations. Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-6).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    HISTORY 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

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    HISTORY 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


    Undergraduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


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