College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History of Art


This page was created at 9:09 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in History of Art
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTART

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for History of Art.


HISTART 403/NR&E 403. History of Human Interaction with the Land.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth A Brabec (ebrabec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The intent of this course is to survey the human management and design of open space throughout history. The discussions will focus on gardens, urban open spaces, and regional and environmental planning. Prototypes will be viewed and analyzed not only within the cultural context of their own time and place, but also in terms of the influence each has had in shaping 20th-century perceptions of the landscape.

The course will also introduce students to specific areas of knowledge and expertise which currently comprise the practice of landscape architecture. The potential roles landscape architects will play in shaping and managing the environment in the future will be discussed.

The course will consist of slide-illustrated lectures by the instructor and guest lecturers. There will be no regularly scheduled discussion section. Questions are welcome and encouraged during the lecture. In addition to taking a midterm and a final exam, there will be a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 434/Class. Arch. 434. Archaic Greek Art.

Section 001 Image and Experience in the Pre-Classical Aegean.

Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou (papalexa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~papalexa/clasarch434.html

See Classical Archaeology 434.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 453. Venetian Painting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): R Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 102. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Following introductory remarks on the history of Venice and on the character of that extraordinary city, renowned as La Serenissima and the Queen of the Adriatic, the course will survey North Italian and especially Venetian painting from the early 14th C. to the late 16th C. that is, as it evolves from the first stirrings of a personal idiom, through the florid International Style to Early Renaissance realism and High Renaissance idealism, and finally to a Counter-Renaissance statement of great emotional fervor. The period 1450-1600, including such masters as Mantegna, Carpaccio, Giovanni Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, Tintoretto, and Veronese, will be featured. At once attempting to define the special qualities of the Venetian tradition, with its painterly and poetic sensitivities, and the creative uniqueness of some of its leading exponents, the lectures will approach the works of art both with respect to the sociocultural contexts in which they were born and to their relevance to us today. Students will be evaluated by way of midterm and final examinations of essay type.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 472. Nineteenth-Century Architecture.

Section 001 Meets with Architecture 533

Instructor(s): Anatole Senkevitch Jr (senkanat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 102. (3). Rackham credit with additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course traces the leading trends in nineteenth-century architecture, from the contending projects of Neoclassicism and the Gothic Revival to the innovative tendencies seeking variously to harness the impact of industrialization on architecture and urbanism. Elucidating the leading struggles for definition, meaning, and form in the architecture of the period, the course considers the link between theory and practice and the relationship between conceptual, aesthetic and technical factors and their cultural, socioeconomic, and political milieus. Special attention is given to the role of contending strategies in determining the place of tradition and innovation in architecture, in reassessing the concept of style in terms of its link both to its age and to society, and in dealing with the typological consequences of urban modernization and the emergence of a bourgeois architecture. Students will write two short papers and a term paper on a topic of their choice, focusing either on historical research or on a critique of contemporary design.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 487/Chinese 475/Asian Studies 475/RC Hums. 475/Phil. 475. The Arts and Letters of China.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/asian/475/001.nsf

See Chinese 475.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 493. Art of India.

Section 001 Art and Architecture of the Indian subcontinent from the 1st through the 17th Centuries, C.E. Meets with Asian Studies 380.001.

Instructor(s): Alka A Patel (alkap@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 103. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the art and architecture of the Indian subcontinent from the 1st through the 17th centuries, C.E., with references to prehistoric periods as well. In addition to providing students with a general exposure to the Indic visual traditions, the course seeks to examine the simplistic modern understanding of Indian art: With the plethora of religio-cultural patterns thoroughly intertwined within what is broadly known as 'Indian culture', issues of religious and nationalist identification of the art of the subcontinent are foremost in the study of Indian art and architectural history. Surveying objects and buildings from the ancient through the Mughal periods, this course will explore the constantly shifting boundaries between what is Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Islamic in the context of the post-Partition subcontinent.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 565. Early Modern Architecture in Italy, Austria, and Germany.

Section 001 Baroque Architecture. Meets with Architecture 528

Instructor(s): Lydia M Soo (lmsoo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course examines the architecture of the Baroque period in the buildings and cities of the late 16th to the mid-18th centuries in Italy, France, England, and Central Europe. They will be discussed in relationship to contemporary theoretical writings, addressing issues of function, structure, and beauty, as well as in relationship to the cultural context of the Baroque period, including philosophical, religious, political, economic, and environmental factors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

HISTART 581/AAPTIS 580. Islamic Architecture: Continuity and Innovation.

Section 001 A Millennium of Islamic Architecture: Continuity and Innovation.

Instructor(s): Alka A Patel (alkap@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 285. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the architecture of the Islamic world from Spain to India, spanning the mid-seventh through eighteenth centuries, C.E. It will provide students with a brief background to the indigenous architectural traditions in regions as geographically diverse as South Asia and southern Europe. Subsequently, the course will explore the development of what is generally classified as Islamic architecture, a single category used in scholarship despite the variation of architectural traditions encompassed within it. The course seeks to deepen the simplistic modern understanding of what is 'Islamic': Students will be asked to identify the constituents of 'Islamic culture', necessary for the eventual identification of Islamic architecture. Essential to this process of identification will be the awareness of strong regional traditions, and the degrees of their confluence and interaction with what was a newly coalescing cultural complex during the first thousand years of its existence. The course will require participation in the weekly discussions, based on the lectures, readings and the issues raised therein. In addition to the midterm examination, a presentation, and a subsequent paper will also be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 600. Independent Study.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of graduate advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An independent studies course under the supervision of one of the History of Art faculty members.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HISTART 603. Independent Study in Asian Art.

Section 001.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of graduate advisor. (1-4). (Independent).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTART 618/Class. Arch. 618. Ancient Sealing Archives: Case Studies in Archaeological Practice and Cross-Disciplinary Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret C Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As a collective enterprise this seminar critically examines the concept of an "archive" of sealed artifacts and/or documents, attempting ultimately to build a dossier of theoretically paradigmatic exemplars. Using case studies ranging from late prehistory into the Hellenistic period, students will also pursue individual research projects in which they approach specific substantive/methodological challenges embedded in the study of sealing archives. Topics may include, e.g., issues of field practice, ancient administrative/record-keeping protocols, functional analyses of container sealings, finger-print analysis, neutron activation analysis, strategies in complex imagery documentation, critical applications of specific strategies in visual analysis and interpretation (such as hand attribution, semiotics). All topics will be in aid of understanding the potentials of given strategies within the framework of excavated archival systems.

In Winter 2001 a series of guest specialists will enhance our seminar discussions.

Students will have weekly readings, participate actively in seminar discussions based on those readings, will report on their research in seminar, and will submit the research paper in preliminary and final versions.

Course packs available at Accucopy. Course reserve at the Fine Arts Library, Tappan Hall.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HISTART 633/Class. Arch. 633. Roman Numismatics.

Section 001 Ancient & Medieval Numismatics

Instructor(s): Alan M Stahl (amstahl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 638.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 646. Problems in Medieval Art.

Section 001 Archaeological Textiles.

Instructor(s): Thelma K Thomas (tkthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As the stuff of clothing, furnishings, tools, and a wide variety of goods, textiles are integral to human society. Increasingly, approaches to textiles as *realia* are complementing longstanding scholarly interests in technique, style, and symbolic import. This seminar will introduce students to the rudiments of physical analysis, contextual issues and archaeological reportage by means of assigned readings, discussions, and hands-on exercises. Such topics as production, consumption, trade and gifting, as well as dress, costume, and fashion will be considered in light of selected case studies. participation in analytical exercises and discussions is required since it will provide necessary background for the students' own work. Students will undertake original research projects which will be presented in two focused preliminary oral reports, one oral presentation of research results, and a final paper. Students may choose topics from any culture or time period. Readings for class discussion will reflect this inclusivity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1/ Permission of Instructor"

HISTART 655. Studies in the History of the History of Art.

Section 001 Representing Jan Van Eyck.

Instructor(s): Celeste A Brusati (cbrusati@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Jan van Eyck was a legend in his own time. Credited by early modern writers with the discovery of oil painting, Van Eyck was canonized definitively as the founding father of a new pictorial tradition in Karel van Mander's Schilder-boeck of 1604, the first history of the pictorial arts in the Netherlands. Van Mander presented Van Eyck both as the inventor of a new technology of painting that exceeded all others in its representational possibilities, and as the artist who realized the descriptive and illusionist potential of this innovation in his own art. Van Eyck's work is still seen as exemplifying many of the ongoing concerns of Netherlandish pictorial art, among them consummate craftsmanship and representational ingenuity, a preoccupation with the image-making properties of light, a fascination with shifting perspectives that conjoin the microscopic and the telescopic, and the ingenious incorporation of symbolic expression into the display of descriptive artistry.

This seminar offers a critical exploration of how and to what ends Van Eyck has been represented both in the early modern period and in our own time. After investigating the crucial role of Van Eyck's art in framing the critical discourse of Netherlandish art during the course of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, we will turn our attention to what later artists and commentators, including modern scholars, have made of Van Eyck in their efforts to emulate, deploy, interpret, and otherwise come to terms with his compelling artistry.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HISTART 690/Chinese 695. Topics in the Theory and Criticism of Chinese Art.

Section 001 Visual Culture in 20th-Century China.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (ningq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One 400-level or higher course in Chinese art history and 2 years Chinese language. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A fundamental transition from an ancient civilization to a modern society took place in China in the last century. How was this transition revealed in the visual culture of the time? How were the visual media, including painting, sculpture, architecture, drama, dance, cinema, photography, television, and woodblock print, used by varied social groups and individuals to express their political and aesthetic ideas? China also experienced frequent foreign economical, cultural, and military invasions in this time. How did the foreign invasions influence the Chinese society and change the visual culture of China?

This seminar examines the exciting visual phenomena such as political posters, national art shows, "model operas," experimental films, and popular TV series from the perspective of national identity, gender role, visual tradition, personal choice, and collective memory. Reading knowledge of Chinese desirable but not required. In addition to the art history students, students of Chinese history, literature, drama, and politics are extremely welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 700. Independent Research.

Prerequisites: Approval of graduate advisor. Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTART 720/WS 720. Gender and Sexuality in the Visual Arts.

Section 001 Gender and Courts in Early Modern Europe.

Instructor(s): Patricia Simons

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Under reformulation during the Early Modern period, as the knight became a courtier, the prince, an absolutist monarch, courts confronted challenges to gender norms. Different standards of masculinity redefined the ideal prince and his courtier. Metaphors and mechanisms of power adjusted in various ways to queens like Elizabeth 1 and Christina of Sweden, or regents such as Catherine de'Medici in France, or ruler's wives like Mantua's Isabella d'Este.

We will examine these gender dynamics in the fifteenth and chiefly sixteenth centuries, taking as a crucial text Castiglione's renowned and much translated Courtier (1528). The course will consider how courtly women used cultural patronage and to what purposes; and whether they specialized in particular forms of portraiture, collecting, "matronage", or spectatorship. The complex representation of femininity is also a core issue, ranging as it does from the demure portrayal to eroticized mythologies produced by Titian, Giulio Romano, the School of Fontainebleau, and other artists. Since courts were large households, we broaden our focus beyond people at the center of power to consider other roles: female clients who were court artists (primarily Sofonisba Anguissola working in Spain), and ladies-in-waiting and pages whose relations with those having more power were potentially homoerotic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HISTART 748. Manuscript Illumination of the Middle Ages.

Section 001 The Classics in the Middle Ages.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth L Sears (esears@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar concerns medieval and early modern responses to the literary heritage of classical antiquity. It offers, in the first analysis, an introduction to the study of manuscripts: students will be assigned exercises in practical paleography and codicology, working with medieval manuscripts in UM collections. One major theme will be the transmission of classical texts in the Latin West: we will examine the specific historical circumstances under which ancient literary and didactic works were copied, read, edited, translated, and commented on, and we will investigate shifts and variations in the emerging canon. But the chief purpose of the course will be to study illustrated manuscripts of ancient texts and the visualization of the matter of antiquity: we will deal with copies and adaptations of cycles originating in antiquity and also with new creations of the middle ages and the early modern era. The course will provide an introduction to influential scholarship on the theme of the "survival of the classical tradition" (das Nachleben der Antike), ranging from the work of Aby Warburg to that of Kurt Weitzmann. Some Knowledge of Latin is desirable but not necessary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HISTART 772. Problems in Modern Art.

Section 001 Image, Ideology, Opposition: Form and Signification in Paris Art and Culture, 1848-1894.

Instructor(s): Howard G Lay (hglay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is concerned with the development of strategies for interpretive readings of pictures within historical context. The context is Paris during the second half of the nineteenth century; the visual materials include painting, caricature, political cartoons, photography, and publicity posters: the strategies are derived from art history, narrative theory, ideology studies (recent and traditional), and a broad range of methods that loosely coalesce under the rubric of "cultural history." The course is designed to asses recent theorizations of modernism in relationship to a wide range of Parisian cultural phenomena from the somewhat narrow interests of professional artists, writers, and critics, to the broader consequences of industrialization, urban modernism, and the rise of mass culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5/permission insructor

HISTART 801/Class. Arch. 801. The Orientalizing Phenomenon in the Greek World of the Early First Millennium BCE.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou (papalexa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~papalexa/clasarch434.html

See Classical Archaeology 801.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 890/Class. Arch. 890. Problems in Greek Archaeology.

Section 001 Evolution of Old World States and Empires in Comparative Perspectives. Meets with Cultural Anthropology 683.003.

Instructor(s): John Cauclner Cherry (jcherry@umich.edu) , Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 890.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HISTART 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


Undergraduate Course Listings for HISTART.


Page


This page was created at 9:09 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.


This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2001 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.