College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Institute for the Humanities


This page was created at 9:10 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Institute for the Humanities
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for INSTHUM

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Institute for the Humanities.


INSTHUM 511. Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies.

Section 001 False Documents: The Art and Science of Simulation. (3 credits). Meets with English 540.001.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Certain works of literature, art, music and science try to pass themselves off as more real than they are. In Pale Fire, Nabokov creates a fictitious poet and that poet's masterpiece, as well as a fictitious critic who annotates the poem. The Museum of Jurassic Technology in L.A. presents scientific wonders that do not exist in nature. J.S.G. Boggs paints counterfeit money and barters it to buy what he needs. Peter Schickele invents a lost relation of J.S. Bach, composes his oeuvre and performs it. We will spend our time in class trying to figure out what such well-intentioned forgers are doing, and why. At home, we will create our own forgeries, to be presented to one another and the public. Students in all fields of the humanities and sciences are welcome; applicants should bring to the first meeting a description of who they are and why they want to take the class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

INSTHUM 511. Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies.

Section 002 Constructions of Cultural Memory and Collective Identity: Readings in Theory and Practice. (3 credits). Meets with AAPTIS 592.001.

Instructor(s): Carol B Bardenstein (cbardens@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 592.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

INSTHUM 611. Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies.

Section 001 Prosperos, Calibans, Mirandas, and Others: Race and Gender in the New World. (3 credits). Meets with CAAS 558.001, American Culture 699.001, and History 698.003.

Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu), Arlene Rosemary Keizer

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The body and sexuality, Michel Foucault argues, form the nexus around which the elaborate knowledge/power grids that characterize "Western" modernity have developed. Theories of race and racialization and feminist theories, examined alongside Foucault's paradigm, lead us to see that sexualized bodies are always racialized and gendered bodies as well.

An interdisciplinary and comparative seminar, this course seeks to explore the ways in which sexuality, race, and gender were constituted interactively at two key points in English, Caribbean, and U.S. history and literature: the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the point of first contact between the English and those "others" who would prove central to their economic and political domination of the "New World" and the twentieth century, which saw the development of the civil-rights movement and of anti-colonial, nationalist political movements, as well as the flowering of the literatures of Caribbean "others."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

INSTHUM 611. Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies.

Section 002 The Mapping of Arabia. (3 credits). Meets with AAPTIS 660.001/Hist. 827.001 and MENAS 695.034/Hist. 793.034/AAPTIS 793.034

Instructor(s): Michael David Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The larger context of this course is twofold: medieval Arab and Islamic formal representations of space; and "lived space," the ways in which people in the medieval Islamic world occupied space and assigned meanings to it. As this is a new area of inquiry in some ways, we will spend time learning and applying the new techniques of geoinformatics. Within this larger context, this course will focus on Arabia in the period before, during, and after the rise of Islam. We look at the fierce debate over the extent and the historical role of "Meccan trade" in these events. We consider recent writings that have introduced the concept of space into the argument. Then we begin to create "databases" for visual representation through geoinformatics. These include information from medieval Arabic sources, as well as from modern archaeology, regarding markets, sanctuaries, trade and pilgrimage routes, and other things. However, we must remember that many of the elements in these databases are open to challenge, even as we strive to represent them visually. The course also examines various representations of Arabia by medieval Islamic and modern Western authors. These include schematic representations of "tribal Arabia" made on the basis of medieval genealogical works, and other representations made both with and without the computer.

This course is intended for graduates and advanced undergraduates. Assigned readings are all in English, including translations of Arabic texts. For readers of Arabic, a parallel reading course can be arranged. Students will produce independent work, either as a research paper or in electronic format. Support has been obtained from the Office of the Vice President for Research for these new course, together with other geoinformatics projects organized by the Center for Middle Eastern and North African Studies, the Center for European Studies, the China Data Center, and other constituent units of the International Institute.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for INSTHUM.


Page


This page was created at 9:10 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.


This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2001 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.