College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Public Policy Studies


This page was created at 9:09 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Public Policy Studies
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for PUBPOL

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Public Policy Studies.


PUBPOL 529/Poli. Sci. 529. Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martha B Aliaga (aliaga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in calculus or concurrent enrollment in Math 413, and permission of instructor. Previous coursework in statistics is not required. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course covers descriptive statistics, probability theory, probability distributions (normal, binomial, Poisson, exponential), sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and simple regression analysis. It also includes an introduction to experimental design and to Bayesian decision analysis. The emphasis in the course in on preparing competent users and consumers of basic statistics. Some attention is paid to the mathematical underpinnings of statistical theory so that students will be prepared to go on to the SPP econometrics course (SPP 571).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PUBPOL 540/Econ. 540. International Economic Policy.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Mary Dominguez (kathrynd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Public Policy 555. Presumes prior or concurrent knowledge of intermediate macroeconomics. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~kathrynd/PUBPOL542page.html

This course provides an overview of international financial economics, developing analytic tools and concepts that can be used to analyze world economic policy debates. It covers the international implications of macroeconomic policies, international monetary arrangements and institutions, and stabilization programs for developing countries. Although the major emphasis of the course is on the macroeconomics of international economics, a portion of the course will also examine the microeconomic context. Topics will include the basic theories of international trade and factor movements and how trade and exchange rates determine the international balance of payments. The class will be limited to 35 students with first preference going to Ford School students.

Prerequisites: PUPPOL 555 (intermediate microeconomics) and PUBPOL 556 (intermediate macroeconomics), or permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PUBPOL 556/Econ. 556. Macroeconomics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Mary Dominguez (kathrynd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~kathrynd/spp556page.html

This course will teach students the basic tools of macroeconomics and apply them to real world economic policy. The goals of the course are for students to (a) understand how to evaluate macroeconomic conditions such as unemployment, inflation, and growth (b) understand how monetary policy and fiscal policy can be used to influence macroeconomic conditions (c) understand media accounts of macroeconomic events. The course will cover a broad range of topics in macroeconomic policy. Examples of issues to be discussed include the role of fiscal and monetary policies in stabilizing the economy, the relationship between inflation and unemployment, the role of government policy in promoting long-term economic growth, monetary and fiscal policies in an open economy, deficits and debt, and European Monetary Union. The course will be structured around the tools (models) of macroeconomics, using primarily graphs, and occasionally equations. However, motivation for these tools, and examples of their use will always be taken from current and recent real-world macroeconomics events and conditions. This course is limited to 35 students, and Ford School students will be given first preference. Prerequisite: PUBPOL555 or Economics 401 (Intermediate Microeconomics), or the equivalent.

Text: Mankiw, N. Gregory, Macroeconomics, 4th Edition, New York: Worth Publishers, 1999.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PUBPOL 571/Econ. 571. Applied Econometrics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kevin A Clarke

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to econometric methods and their use in policy analysis. Most of the course focuses on multiple regression analysis, beginning with ordinary least squares estimation, and then considers the implications and treatment of serial correlation, heteroskedasticity, specification error, and measurement error. The course also provides an introduction to simultaneous equations models, time series analysis, models for binary dependent variables, and methods for longitudinal analysis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PUBPOL 571/Econ. 571. Applied Econometrics.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Paul Rilstone

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


PUBPOL 573/Econ. 573. Benefit-Cost Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kerwin K Charles (kcharles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 555. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course teaches students how to evaluate government programs. It covers the mechanics of benefit-cost analysis, how scarce or unemployed resources should be priced, the choice of a proper time discount rate, treatment of income distribution issues, environmental benefits, intergovernmental grants, and regulatory problems. A concluding section handles some methodological issues such as the optimal scale of an investigation and the potentials of social experimentation. An essential part of the course is a term project each student selects a program and evaluates it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PUBPOL 638/Pol. Sci. 638. Field Training.

Section 001 Integrated Policy Exercise (IPE). (1 credit).

Instructor(s): Ann Chih Lin (annlin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-4). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: http://www.spp.umich.edu/academics/IPE2001/index.html

The 2001 Integrated Policy Exercise (IPE) focuses on an emerging issue: possible revisions to North American guestworker policies.

I. CRITERIA: During this year's IPE, you will have the chance to develop policy proposals on behalf of a sector: business, labor, farmworker advocates, immigration restrictionists, and state/provincial governments. The evaluation of your proposal will be based on the extent to which it advances: 1. The concerns of your sector's constituency; 2. The particular interests of organizations in your sector; 3. An economic justification and/or a defense of its economic implications; 4. Possibilities for cooperation with some or all of the other sectors; 5. Answers to anticipated opposition from the other sectors.

II. CONTENT: Your sector may choose to offer a comprehensive guestworker policy, guidelines about particular aspects of guestworker policy, or a detailed proposal for one aspect of the guestworker issue. Which you choose is dependent upon your interests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PUBPOL 732/Pol. Sci. 734/Education 764. Public Policy in Postsecondary Education.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Donald E Heller

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~ed764/

This course examines contemporary higher education public policy issues and provides a general introduction to the policymaking process in the United States. It illustrates the creative tension that characterizes the American federal system and the interplay of different levels and branches of government as they formulate and implement higher education policy. The course will focus on state policy issues as well as on federal higher education policy. Special attention will be given to the topic of affirmative action and public policy. The course will include presentations by guest speakers who will address current issues relating to public policy and higher education.

The course has two parts. The first consists of readings and class discussions about public policymaking in general and major higher education policies in particular. The second part consists of in-depth policy analysis briefings that will be conducted by the students.

Course Objectives: The aims of this course include:

  1. To develop an understanding of public policymaking, especially the processes of the legislative and executive branches and the relative influence of state and national governments on postsecondary education;
  2. To examine the roles of key public officials, interest groups, political parties, the media, and public opinion;
  3. To become familiar with the policy issues that are shaping the future of American postsecondary education;
  4. To determine the utility of theoretical and conceptual models of policymaking;
  5. To examine how public policies have affected the use of affirmative action in higher education;
  6. To enhance skills for analysis and advocacy of public policies, especially policy research; interview skills; critical thinking about policy dilemmas; and precise, persuasive, succinct public speaking and writing.

Required readings:

  • The following books can be purchased at Ulrich's (shelved under ED764). They are also available on 4-hour loan at University Reserves, Shapiro Library:

    1. Cook, Constance Ewing. Lobbying for Higher Education. Vanderbilt University Press, 1998.
    2. Crosby, Faye J. and Cheryl VanDeVeer. Sex, Race, & Merit: Debating Affirmative Action in Education and Employment. U. of Michigan Press, 2000.
    3. Heller, Donald E. (Ed.). The States and Public Higher Education Policy: Affordability, Access, and Accountability. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001.
    4. Keefe, William J. and Morris S. Ogul. The American Legislative Process: Congress and the States, 10th ed. Prentice Hall, 2001.
  • A course packet of additional readings is available from Grade A Notes.
  • Additional on-line readings will be available via links on the course website.
  • Because of cost issues, three of the course readings are available on reserve at IRIS and the Undergraduate Library Reserve Room.
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education You will be expected to keep abreast of current public higher education policy issues by reading The Chronicle each week. It is available in the CSHPE office, IRIS, Shapiro Undergraduate Library, Hatcher Graduate Library, and other libraries throughout the campus. It is also available on the Web through the University's subscription to the LEXIS-NEXIS Academic Universe (link available on the ED764 course website).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PUBPOL 741/Econ. 586. Principles of Finance & Global Financial Markets.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Mary Dominguez (kathrynd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPP 555 or Econ 501; Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~kathrynd/spp741page.html

The first half of this course will introduce the principles of finance. We will explore how stocks and bonds are valued, the measurement and management of financial risk, and the lessons and limitations of finance theory. The second half of the course will examine institutions and current practices in (developed and emerging) financial markets. We will examine the use of derivative instruments to hedge currency and interest rate risk, the relationship between the development of financial markets and economic growth, and the financing of developing country debt. The overall course objective is to learn the theory and practice of modern global finance. This class is limited to 35 students and first preference will be given to Ford School students. Prerequisite: PUBPOL 555 or Economics 401 (Intermediate Economics), or the equivalent.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PUBPOL 770/Hist. 772. Seminar in American Social History.

Section 001 History & Domestic Policy Making.

Instructor(s): Maris Vinovskis (vinovski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.spp.umich.edu/courses/syllabi/PUBPOL770_W01_Syllabus.htm

See History 772.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for PUBPOL.


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