College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Linguistics


This page was created at 9:11 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Linguistics
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for LING

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Linguistics.


LING 447/Psych. 445. Psychology of Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stefan A Frisch (sfrisch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Psych. 340. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~sfrisch/L447_W01.html

This course examines the cognitive processes involved in language use, and the methodology for studying it. The course focuses primarily on adult language processing, but some aspects of language acquisition and research on infants are covered. Issues covered in lecture and in-class experiments include speech perception and sentence parsing, speech production and speech errors, accessing the mental dictionary, processing ambiguity, asphasia and neuroimaging, and neural network simulations. Performance is evaluated based on class participation, exams, and an article review.

Text (available from Michigan Book Supply): Altmann, Gerry T. M. (1997). The ascent of Babel: An exploration of language, mind, and understanding. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

LING 473/Anthro. 473. Ethnopoetics: Cross-Cultural Approaches to Verbal Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in anthropology, linguistics, or literature. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 473.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 002 Language Contact. Meets with Linguistics 792.002

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Language contact is a fact of life for most of the world's people: throughout the world, monolingualism is the exception rather than the norm. This class will survey social and linguistic aspects of language contact, with special emphasis on the linguistic results of different kinds of contact situations. We will cover the following topics: the social settings of language contacts; some social and linguistic predictors of contact-induced language change; mechanisms of contact-induced change; how to identify contact-induced changes retrospectively; linguistic areas; the origins and structures of pidgins, creoles, and bilingual mixed languages; and the various routes to language death. A single theme runs through the entire course: although robust generalizations can be drawn about many aspects of language contact, contact-induced change like other aspects of language history is essentially unpredictable.

The class will be run as a seminar: mainly discussion, with a few lectures for orientation. The requirements will be (1) two or three short papers that will eventually be incorporated into (2) a single final term paper; and (3) active participation in class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 003 Corpus Linguistics. Meets with Linguistics 792.003

Instructor(s): Rita Carol Simpson

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/ling/492/003.nsf

Computerized corpora of many languages have proliferated in recent years, providing linguists and language teachers access to large quantities of written and spoken data. Corpus linguistics is a method for analyzing and exploiting such data using computer tools. This course will be a general introduction to corpus linguistics for students with an interest in empirical investigations of language and in the use of computers for linguistic analysis. The course will include a fair amount of hands-on work to familiarize students with different corpora and text analysis programs. Major themes of the course will be building corpora (of both written and spoken language), corpus-based descriptions of English, techniques and tools used in corpus analysis, and applications of corpus-based research.

Projects and discussion of potential applications will depend in part on students interests, and may include: using corpora for language teaching, corpus annotation for sociolinguistic or discourse analysis research, corpus-based studies of syntax, uses of corpora in historical linguistics, language acquisition, natural language processing, or translation studies. Throughout the class we will consider the questions of what linguistic phenomena computers are best suited for, and how we can best use computer tools to enhance our analytical skills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 513. Phonology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): San Duanmu (duanmu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Ling. 313. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Phonology studies the sound system of human languages. This course introduces the basic elements in phonology. Topics include distinctive features, phonological rules, prosodic structure (syllable, stress, tone, intonation), multi-tiered phonology, feature geometry, underspecification, and Optimality Theory. Both theory and problem-solving ability will be emphasized. Besides readings for class, weekly exercises constitute an important part of the course. In addition, there is a final project on a selected topic. Prerequisite: Linguistics 313 or 512, or permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 514(414). Semantics and Pragmatics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jason Stanley (jasoncs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Linguistics 314. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a graduate level introduction to Semantic Theory. The main task of semantic theory is to give an account of how what is expressed by a sentence is derived from the syntactic structure of the sentence and the meanings of its constituent parts. The working hypothesis of most semanticists is that the best way to model what is expressed by a sentence relative to an occasion is by the conditions under it is true. Our purpose in this class will be to construct a theory that assigns truth-conditions to an ever expanding fragment of natural language that correctly reflect the truth-conditional intuitions of native speakers. We will begin with a relatively simple language involving just names and one-place predicates, and will add, as the academic term proceeds, sentential connectives, relational expressions, quantifier phrases, relative clauses, and adverbs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 540/AAPTIS 540. Structure of Persian and Iranian Linguistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot L Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Taught in English. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 540.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 613. Advanced Phonology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): San Duanmu (duanmu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Ling. 513. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will read and discuss selected works on issues that are of fundamental interest to phonology. We will focus on the following areas: Feature theory, Syllable theory, Metrical phonology, & Optimality Theory. Regular course work includes assigned readings, participation in class discussion, and exercises. In addition, each student is expected to choose and work on a research topic, give a class presentation towards the end of the course, and submit the result in a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 615. Advanced Syntax.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Samuel D Epstein (sepstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Ling. 515 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A second term graduate level course in Syntactic theory. The intent is to move beyond the introductory-text level, begin reading primary literature critically, undertake research, and extend knowledge of the Government-Binding theory sufficient to initiate an informed investigation of the motivations for and overall design features of the Minimalist Program. Course Requirements: Class participation (25%), Midterm squib 5-10 pages (25%), Final research paper approx. 20 pages (25%), Class Presentation (25%). Prerequisite: Linguistics 515 or permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 756/Psych. 756. The Development of Language and Communication Skills.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marilyn J Shatz (mshatz@umich.edu), Samuel D Epstein

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 756.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 002 Language Contact. Meets with Linguistics 492.002

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Linguistics 492.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 003 Corpus Linguistics. Meets with Linguistics 492.003

Instructor(s): Rita Carol Simpson

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/ling/492/003.nsf

See Linguistics 492.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 801. Seminar on Graduate Study.

Section 001 History of the Modern Field of Linguistics: The Past 30 Years of (mostly American) Linguistics. (1 credit).

Instructor(s): Sally Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-2).

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar has three goals. The first is to introduce students to the history of the modern field of linguistics. In the Fall Term we will focus on readings and discussions that will take us from 19th-century linguistics through the Chomskyan revolution of the 1960s. In the Winter Term we will concentrate on the past 30 years of (mostly American) linguistics. The second goal is to begin to develop an understanding of the diverse approaches to the study of linguistics and an appreciation for the relations among these different approaches. Thus the course also serves as a forum where students can discuss how the various aspects of their coursework fit together. These two goals converge in helping us to build an integrated view of the discipline. The third goal is specific to the first-year students in the Department of Linguistics: the seminar will orient these students to graduate study in linguistics in the Department, and at the university, and to consider first-year students' long-term goals relative to the course of study they are embarking on. Throughout the year, many of our discussions will be led by linguistics faculty with expertise in specific topics to be covered. Students will register for 1 credit in the Winter Term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 812. Seminar: Phonetics.

Section 001 Coarticulatory Variability.

Instructor(s): Patrice Speeter Beddor

Prerequisites: Previous course in phonetics. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

One of the most pervasive aspects of sound structure is that the articulatory and laryngeal configurations for adjacent or nearby sounds overlap. These overlapping configurations or coarticulations lead to context-induced variability in the physiological realizations of phonological segments and, consequently, in their acoustic realizations as well. Such contextual variability is often considered to be the "raw material" for sound changes that give rise to assimilatory phonological phenomena (e.g., nasalization, glottalization, palatalization, tonogenesis, and vowel harmony, to name but a few). At the same time, fundamental aspects of coarticulatory variability are highly systematic, subject to universal constraints imposed by the physiology of the speech mechanism and language-specific constraints on coarticulatory organization. Listeners are selectively sensitive to these constraints: although all acoustic output is lawfully shaped by vocal tract dynamics, listeners' experience with native-language coarticulatory behavior leads to language-specific expectations concerning the acoustic consequences of this behavior. Thus listeners potentially serve as the "gate keepers" for which coarticulatory behaviors become phonologized in a particular language.

This seminar will explore coarticulatory variability from the perspectives of articulation, acoustics, perception, historical change, and synchronic phonological patterning. Of fundamental interest is the interplay between these facets of coarticulation, especially the interplay between speaker- and listener-based demands on coarticulatory behavior, and between phonology (especially prosody) as the source of language-specific coarticulatory behavior but phonetic coarticulation as the source of phonological change. Our approach will include study of the experimental techniques used to measure the articulatory, acoustic, and perceptual consequences of coarticulation; current theoretical models of coarticulation; and recent developments in phonological theory (particularly Optimality Theory) to incorporate phonetic constraints, as they relate to coarticulation. Our approach will be heavily "hands on": early in the term, we will begin acoustic analysis of coarticulatory data that we have collected either as a class or individually (depending on students' interests), and these data will serve throughout the term as the testing ground for the theoretical models (coarticulatory, perceptual, phonological, and possibly historical) to be explored.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 819. Seminar: Discourse Analysis.

Section 001 Narrative.

Instructor(s): Deborah Keller-Cohen (dkc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Previous course in discourse analysis. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for graduate students interested in the study of narrative. Because this literature is vast, our focus this term will be the personal narrative with special attention to the oral self-narrative or life history. Our examination engages scholarly work in anthropology, linguistics, literature, psychology, sociology (and philosophy in a limited way). The explosion of attention to narrative has meant that there are many bodies of research that do not engage each another. Our major goal this term will be to attempt to map out the landscape of this work, identifying and evaluating the key issues and concepts as well as the methods for examining these. The course also enables you to explore a topic of specific importance to you.

No prior coursework in linguistics is required. However, for those students without prior coursework in discourse analysis, I will hold a 30 min session during the first half hour of class on one or two occasions to provide you with fundamentals you will need.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

LING 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

LING 997. Special Research I and II.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a graduate-level independent research course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


Undergraduate Course Listings for LING.


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