College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Philosophy


This page was created at 9:13 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Philosophy
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for PHIL

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Philosophy.


PHIL 405. Philosophy of Plato.

Section 001 The Great Dialogues of Plato's "Middle Period" and his Ethical Psychology.

Instructor(s): Rachana Kamtekar (rkamteka@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One philosophy introduction. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will read the great dialogues of Plato's "middle period" (broadly construed), with special attention to Plato's views on ethical psychology. Topics to be discussed include: desire and motivation; the relationship between virtue, knowledge or true belief and happiness; and pleasure. Although our focus will be on the ethical psychology of Plato's middle period, we will also examine Plato's metaphysics and epistemology where these are relevant to his ethical psychology, and we will consider Plato's views in these dialogues in light of views on related topics in the early dialogues and criticisms in later dialogues. Dialogues to be studied include: Protagoras, Phaedo, Gorgias, Republic, Symposium, Phaedrus, and Philebus.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 415. Advanced Mathematical Logic.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas Hofweber (hofweber@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Phil. 414. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 417. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will discuss and prove some of the highlights in logic such as Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems, and various results in proof theory and set theory, depending on student interest and background.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 420. Philosophy of Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James P Tappenden (tappen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: A course in logic, and either Phil. 345 or 383. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides upper-level undergraduates and beginning graduate students with a broad overview of the philosophy of science. It seeks to clarify the nature of the "scientific method" and to explain its success. Topics to be covered include: the process by which scientific hypotheses are confirmed by empirical evidence, the nature of scientific laws and their role in explanation, the logical and semantic structure of scientific theories, the "realism/anti-realism debate" concerning the nature of unobservable entities and processes, the objectivity of science, the distinction between science and nonscience. Students will be asked to read about 50 pages of material per week, to write two 10-12 page papers, and to take a midterm examination and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 428/Poli. Sci. 428/Asian Studies 428/Soc. 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mary Gallagher (metg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Political Science 428.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 455. Contemporary Moral Problems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter A Railton (prailton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Not open to graduate students in philosophy. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 355. (4). Does not meet the Philosophy Department's 400-level course requirement for Philosophy concentrators.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended primarily for graduate students outside the philosophy department. Course content is the same as in Philosophy 355. Philosophy 455 requires longer and more substantial papers than those expected in Philosophy 355.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 462. British Empiricism.

Section 001 The British Empiricists & the French Enlightenment.

Instructor(s): Edwin M Curley (emcurley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One philosophy introduction. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~emcurley/462syl01.htm

The content of this course will be considerably broader than the title suggests. In addition to studying the three classical British Empiricists (Locke, Berkeley and Hume), we will also give nearly equal time to some of the leading figures of the French Enlightenment (Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot and Rousseau). There will be two papers, a midterm and a final. For further details please consult the professor's web site: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~emcurley/

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 466. Topics in Continental Philosophy.

Section 001 Kierkegaard.

Instructor(s): Michelle Kosch (mkosch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One of Phil. 371, 375, 385, or 389. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The main focus of the course will be Kierkegaard's pseydonymous authorship and its historical context. Readings will include portions of Philosophical Fragments, Concluding Unscientific Postscript, The Concept of Anxiety and The Sickness unto Death, as well as selections from Hegel, Fichte, Schelling, Jacobi, and Schleiermacher. Depending on student interest, some time may be spent at the end of the academic term on Kierkegaard's impact on some figure in the 20th century (Wittgenstein and Heidegger come first to mind, but other suggestions will be welcome).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 467/Chinese 467. Confucianism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thornton Charles Kline III (tckline@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing; no knowledge of Chinese required. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Chinese 467.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 475/Chinese 475/Asian Studies 475/RC Hums. 475/Hist. of Art 487. The Arts and Letters of China.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). May not be included in a concentration plan in philosophy.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/asian/475/001.nsf

See Chinese 475.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 481. Metaphysics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas Hofweber (hofweber@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Phil. 345 or 383. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hofweber/courses/

An examination of some of the central problems in metaphysics such as appearance and reality, time, universals and particulars, causation, realism and anti-realism, ontology, and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 486/WS 486. Topics in Feminist Philosophy.

Section 001 Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth S Anderson (eandersn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in either Philosophy or Women's Studies. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/phil/486/001.nsf

The topics for this term are feminist epistemology and philosophy of science. Is knowledge gendered? Are scientific conceptions of objectivity "masculine"? What could it mean to make such claims, and how could they be justified? We will investigate the varied ways ideas about gender, gender roles, and gender identity influence the construction of knowledge and the representation of objectivity. Competing views about these influences empiricism, standpoint theory, postmodernism will be explored in the context of empirical research in the social sciences, biology, and medicine. Special attention will be given to the interaction of evidence and social/political values in inquiry. There will be a research paper, one short paper, and a final examination. Classes will be conducted as interactive lecture/discussions. Students with background (at least 2 courses) in either philosophy or women's studies are welcome to join a constructive dialogue.

Texts:

  • Helen Longino, Science as Social Knowledge (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1990). This book has been ordered at Shaman Drum Bookshop, 313 S. State St., 662-7407.
  • Donna Haraway, Primate Visions: Gender, Race, and Nature in the World of Modern Science (New York: Routledge, 1989). This book may be ordered from Amazon.com (which promises delivery in a few days) or another bookstore.
  • A Coursepack, available at Excel Test Preparation, Coursepacks & Copies, 1117 South University (the second floor above Ulrich's Art and Electronics), 996-1500.
  • The Course Website, at http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/phil/486/001.nsf. A few readings will only be accessible online through this website. Go to the online course syllabus and click on the link to the title of the reading assignment.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHIL 530. Topics in Epistemology.

    Section 001 Rationality, Externalism, and Virtue.

    Instructor(s): Adam Morton

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    We will look at the idea of a rational belief and the idea of a rational action, and ask what they have in common. Along the way we will discuss some old puzzles in decision theory, like Newcomb's problem and problems about dynamic choice, and some fashionable issues in epistemology, like epistemic virtues and externalist theories of justification and knowledge.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 540. Topics in Philosophy of Mind.

    Section 001 Naturalistic Theories of Meaning.

    Instructor(s): Eric P Lormand (lormand@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    We will discuss the prospects for "naturalistic" theories of meaning. These theories try to explain how bits of brain or noise or ink come to represent things (often called "reference"), and whether and how these representations depend on one another (often called "sense" or "conceptual structure"). The hard part is, naturalist theories try to explain meaning completely noncircularly, as a combination of ingredients that are each meaningless "natural" properties such as causation, laws of nature, and natural selection. We'll measure ongoing projects (e.g., from Jerry Fodor and Ruth Millikan) against both technical criticisms and sweeping alternatives (e.g., from Saul Kripke's Wittgenstein). Some related topics we'll hit are the analytic/synthetic distinction, the a priori/a posteriori disinction, meaning holism, and attempts to explain linguistic and mental representation in terms of one another.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    PHIL 596. Reading Course.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (2-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A faculty-directed independent study.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    PHIL 598. Independent Literature Survey.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    An independent literature survey in which a student reviews basic literature in a given area of philosophy and writes an extended bibliographic essay that sets forth a range of major positions within that area, indicates how various philosophers fit within this range of positions, and provides critical commentary on the positions, indicating, for example, the chief advantages and disadvantages of each, resulting in a critical bibliographic essay. Students must seek guidance from a faculty member in selecting a reasonable range of works for study. Students are encouraged to carry out such surveys during the summer months. If the ILS is to commence in the Spring/Summer or Fall, initial guidance should be sought the preceding April; if it is to commence in the Winter, initial guidance should be sought no later than the preceding December. The bibliographic essays will be evaluated by the faculty member and may, if appropriate, be certified for distribution

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    PHIL 599. Candidacy Reading Course.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). (INDENPENDENT).

    Credits: (2-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A faculty-directed candidacy reading course in which a student having already successfully completed an independent literature survey in the area of his or her projected dissertation works toward identifying a specific thesis topic and writing a dissertation prospectus, and begins to write material which can be expected to represent some component of the dissertation. If the reading course is to commence in the Fall, students should arrange for faculty direction the preceding April; if it is to commence in the Winter, students should arrange for faculty direction no later than the preceding November. Faculty service in this capacity does not commit the student to asking the faculty member to serve on his or her dissertation committee, nor does it commit the faculty member to agreeing to do so. A student wishing to elect Philosophy 599 must submit a proposed plan of study no later than the beginning of the term for which the course is elected. (Students are urged to consult with their advisors and prospective faculty sponsors as early as possible during the planning of their Reading Course). The plan must be accepted by the faculty sponsor of the course within a week of the beginning of the term. A plan will normally not be acceptable if it overlaps significantly with a departmental course. When the plan of study has been approved by the faculty sponsor, the student will ask the sponsor to sign a Reading Course Approval Form (available from the department office). The student's advisor must countersign the form. The course approval form will be placed in the student's file.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    PHIL 600. Advanced Studies.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Independent study program arranged between instructor and student.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    PHIL 640. Seminar in Ethics.

    Section 001 Kant's Ethics.

    Instructor(s): Stephen Leicester Darwall

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A seminar on Kant's ethics. We will try to read Kant's ethical works, including the less familiar ones, to get a more comprehensive and nuanced picture.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHIL 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    PHIL 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

    Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Winter Academic Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PHIL 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


    Undergraduate Course Listings for PHIL.


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