College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Political Science


This page was created at 9:14 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 – April 26)

Open courses in Political Science
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for POLSCI

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Political Science.


POLSCI 402. Selected Topics in Political Theory.

Section 001 – American Political Thought, 1860 – 2000.

Instructor(s): Anne Manuel (amanuel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Pol. Sci. 101 or 400 or 401. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

President John F. Kennedy once said, "The United States has to move very fast to even stand still." This quotation provides a good sense of the struggles facing American political thinkers since the Civil War. America confronts significant challenges in the post-Civil War era. These challenges include reconstruction, race-based discrimination, industrialization, immigration, labor militancy, the women's suffrage movement, the progressive movement, the call for the welfare state, the civil rights movement, second wave feminism, and the emergence of global capitalism. These challenges force American thinkers to look back to the American founding and to develop radically new modes of political thought. We will see American political thought shift between projects of maintenance and nostalgia on the one hand and projects of revision and reinvention on the other. The thinkers we will consider reveal a sustained commitment to America's founding political principles as well as the innovative political imagination necessary to meet new challenges and to expand the promise of the freedom and equality to previously excluded groups. To deepen our understanding of the political thought of this era, we will work with writings by W.E.B. DuBois, Henry Adams, William James, Jane Addams, Upton Sinclair, William Graham Sumner, John Dewey, Herbert Crowly, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, John Rawls, among others, as well as several key supreme court decisions such as Plessy vs. Ferguson. Course requirements include class participation, a group project, a take-home midterm essay, and a take-home final essay.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1, 4

POLSCI 409. Twentieth Century Political Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Claudia M Ritter (ritterc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Pol. Sci. 101 or 401. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is intended as a comprehensive overview of 20th-century political thought. Readings will include Marxist and liberal thought, theory of action, as well as feminist and postmodern thought. We will analyze the slow but profound change of the central topic over the century. While questions of power and domination prevailed in the first half of the century, theories on democracy and cultural differences shaped the basic discussion during the second half of the century. Authors of the syllabus will be, among others: Weber, Gramsci, Heidegger, Arendt, Rawls, Habermas, Young, Lyotard, Castoriadis.

There will be an oral midterm and a written final exam. Requirements include several short written assignments, regular attendance, reading of the texts, and active discussion participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 410. American Policy Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Marie Howard (meghow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Any 100-level course in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will study the institutions of American federal government: Congress, the Presidency, the bureaucracy and the courts. We will consider how ordinary citizens' concerns are addressed and represented in each institution. This class does not require that you have ever taken any political science course before, but a rudimentary knowledge of American history is helpful, although not mandatory.

If you took PS 411 in the Fall 2000 academic term, you will find PS 410 an extension of our study of how people relate to government and government relates to people. You do not have to take 411 if you took 410, but if you do, you will get the chance to apply what you have learned in 411 about political parties, interest groups, the media, voting and elections, and public opinion to how the institutions of government do or do not respond to these forces.

We will use Lowi & Ginsberg's, American Government 6th edition by W.W. Norton as our core text, then consider several short books on specific topics about American institutions that fit into Lowi and Ginsberg's overall discussion.

We will have three or four exams and a 10-15 page research paper. You may opt to take 410 for Upper-Level Writing Requirement credit, in which case your research paper will be 30 pages long.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 412. Courts, Politics and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Noga Morag-Levine (noga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Courts, what they share with and what distinguishes them from other political institutions, are at the center of this course. The term will be divided into four sections. Part I will examine the structures, practices and organizing principles of central actors and institutions within the judicial process (court structure, judicial selection, juries and the legal profession). Part II will follow the evolution of primary legal theories regarding the impact of political constraints and choices upon judicial reasoning. Particular emphasis will be put on the relationship between political controversies and attendant legal theoretical debates during the New Deal and Warren Court era. Part III will provide an introduction to interdisciplinary studies of courts and society and will draw upon contributions from Political Science, Anthropology, Sociology, Economics, and Literature. Finally, Part IV will incorporate diverse methodological and disciplinary perspectives in the context of two important contemporary legal theoretical debates. The first pertains to the relationship between state law and alternative mechanisms of dispute resolution. The second concerns the viability of law as an instrument of social and political change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 414. The Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Francene M Engel (fengel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. (3). May be repeated twice, for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is concerned with civil rights and civil liberties in the American constitutional system. It will focus on decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court, but will also draw on literature from other sources. The primary substantive aim of the course is to help students develop a theoretically informed understanding of civil liberties and of the institutional devices for enforcing them. Additional aims include helping students to read and criticize political texts, to assess constitutional arguments, and to think and write more rigorously. Some of the topics that will be discussed include racial discrimination, rights to privacy, free speech, religious freedom, rights of the accused as well as others. Students are expected to have read assignments before class and to be prepared to discuss them. Students also will be expected to participate in a moot court exercise. Methods of instruction: lecture (3 hours) and discussion section (1 hour); you must register for both the lecture and discussion section. Prerequisite: A basic understanding of American institutional politics and American history. Some exposure to political theory is helpful, but not required.

Text: American Constitutional Law. Louis Fisher. ISBN:0-89089-759-X.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 419/AAS 418. Black Americans and the Political System.

Section 001 – Black Am & Political System.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. AAS 201 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors and creators and initiators in the political process. And the course will focus upon the inputs, the responses of the decision makers, and the outputs in terms the political process. And the course will focus upon the inputs, the responses of the decision makers, and the outputs in terms of public policies. And finally the various controversies will be explored and analyzed in regard to African American politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 420/Comm. 484. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Mary Young (mmyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Communication Studies 484.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 423. Politics of the Metropolis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gmarkus/ps423w01.html

This course examines the political life of American cities and the metropolitan regions in which they are embedded. Relevant institutions include city government, public authorities, the business sector, nonprofit agencies and organizations, neighborhood groups, and more. Issues include city and regional governance, economic development, urban sprawl, the provision of public services, and the ways that race, ethnicity, and social class are implicated in these and other issues.

Text: Origins of the Urban Crisis. Thomas Sugrue. ISBN: 0691058881. Princeton.

Required Books (available in paperback)

Ross, Bernard H., and Myron A. Levine. (2001) Urban Politics: Power in Metropolitan America, 6th ed. Itasca, Ill.: Peacock.

Wilson, William J. (1996) When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor. New York: Vintage.

In addition to these books, some course readings will be available through the course Website http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gmarkus/ps423w01.html.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1, 4

POLSCI 428/Asian Studies 428/Phil. 428/Soc. 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mary Gallagher (metg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course seeks to convey an overall understanding of the evolution of China during the tumultuous twentieth century, with a strong focus on the current period. While concerned primarily with domestic developments, the course also considers the impact of the global arena on China and the issues China poses in international politics. The course presumes no prior knowledge of China. Three hours of lecture and one of discussion per week. Term paper and two exams.

Textbooks:

  • Chinese Society: Change, Conflict, and Resistance. Elizabeth Perry & Mark Selden, eds. ISBN:0415223342. Routledge.
  • Governing China: From Revolution to Reform. Kenneth Lieberthal. ISBN:0393037878. W.W. Norton.
  • Mao's Children in the New China: Voices from the Red Guard Generation. Yarong Jiang and David Ashely. ISBN:0415223318. Routledge.
  • The Search for Modern China: A Documentary Collection. Pei-Kai Cheng, M Lestz, J.D. Spence. ISBN:0393973727. W.W. Norton.
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 439/Econ. 325. Inequality in the United States.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank W Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 101 and 102. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Economics 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 441. Comparative Politics of Advanced Industrial Democracies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Madeleine Hosli (mhosli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/polsci/441/001.nsf

This course provides an overview of theoretical approaches to study electoral systems and their effects in a variety of advanced industrial democracies. A special focus will be put on Europe. We will compare two-party and multiparty systems and show how governments are formed in different democracies. We analyze both small and large states (including the Germany, France, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Switzerland). We will also study electoral processes and institutions in the European Union (EU), studying the European Parliament and the structure of the Council of the EU. Finally, the course aims to provide recent data on governments and elections in several advanced industrial democracies. There will be a combination of lectures, discussions and projects. Students are expected to do the assigned readings and to actively participate in both class discussions and projects.

Texts:

  • Patterns of Democracy. Arend Lijphart. ISBN: 0300078935. Yale.
  • Multiparty Government. Michael Laver. ISBN: 047208562X. Michigan.
  • Electoral Systems and Party Systems. Arend Lijphart. ISBN: 0198273479. Oxford.
  • Representative Governments in Modern Europe. Peter Mair. ISBN: 007036687X. McGraw-Hill.
  • Germany's Unity Election. Holli A. Semetko. ISBN: 1881303756. Hampton Press.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 454. Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael Ross (mlross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most dynamic and complex regions, and is of growing importance on the global stage. This course offers an introduction to the region for advanced undergraduates; it is also an introduction to some of the broader political, economic, and environmental issues in the developing world. The course has three parts. The first is an introduction to the history and politics of the region; the second is a country-by-country study of nine of Southeast Asia's states: Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Burma. The final section looks at the five central problems facing the region – economic development, environmental protection, international security, human rights, and democratization. Grading will be based on two midterms, a final exam, and in-class discussions.

Texts:

  • Dragon Ascending: Vietnam and the Vietnamese. Henry Kamm. ISBN: 1559703067. Arcade.
  • Southeast Asia: Past and Present, Fourth Ed.. D.R. SarDesai. ISBN: 0813333016. Westview.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 456. Government and Politics of Japan.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven Benfell

Prerequisites: Pol. Sci. 140, 440, or 450. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for advanced undergraduates and is an overview of the government and politics of Japan. General topics to be covered include Japan's political history, political culture, political economy, electoral politics, formal and informal political institutions, state-society relations, political conflict and compromise, corruption, and policy-making processes. The course also covers the prolonged recession and political instability that have characterized Japan for the last ten years. Methods of instruction include lecture and discussion. Course requirements include regular attendance, reading of the texts, class participation, a midterm exam (take-home essay), a final exam (take-home essay and in-class short answer), and a critical review essay.

Textbooks:

  • The Government and Politics of Japan. Hitoshi Abe, Muneyuki Shindo & Sadafumi Kawato. ISBN:0860085015. University of Tokyo.
  • The Making of Modern Japan. Kenneth B. Pyle. ISBN:0669200204. Houghton Mifflin.
  • The Logic of Japanese Politics: Leaders, Institutions and the Limits of Change. Gerald L. Curtis. ISBN:0231108435. Columbia.
  • Shadow Shoguns: the Rise and Fall of Japan's Postwar Political Machine. Jacob M. Schlesinger. ISBN:0804734577. Stanford.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 460. Problems in World Politics.

Section 001 – The Politics of Global Trade and Finance.

Instructor(s): Jude Collin Hays (jchays@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). May be elected for credit twice with permission of the instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/polsci/460/001.nsf

This course will examine the political underpinnings of the global economy. The major analytical approaches to studying international political economy will be covered and used to understand a wide range of topics. We will focus on both the international and domestic politics tied to international trade and finance and discuss whether the institutions that currently govern international economic activity are robust enough to survive important political and economic changes that are currently taking place in the world. For example, we will consider whether the domestic political coalitions that have traditionally supported free trade are breaking up as a result of increased international capital mobility and whether the international cooperation necessary to manage the global economy can survive major changes in the international distribution of power. Classes will be mainly lecture with some discussion. There will be three in-class exams.

Textbooks:

  • The Challenge of Global Capitalism: The World Economy in the 21st C. Robert Gilpin. ISBN:0691049351. Princeton.
  • Globalization and the Postcolonial World: The New Political Economy of Development. Ankie Hoogvelt. ISBN:0801856450. John Hopkins.
  • Partisan Politics in the Global Economy. Geoffrey Garrett. ISBN:0521446902. Cambridge.
  • The Political Economy of the Asia Financial Crisis. Stephan Haggard. ISBN:0881322830. Institute for International Economics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 468. Cooperation and Conflict in the International System.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Douglas W Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We begin by discussing what the international system is, consider the possibility of multiple international systems, and describe some of the history of the modern international system(s). We then turn to consideration of patterns of cooperation and of conflict within the system. We will seek to understand why it is that some members of the system can cooperate in rather remarkable ways, while at other times overt conflict erupts. When discussing cooperation we will pay close attention to arguments about why international cooperation should be especially hard to achieve, and will speculate on ways to overcome these difficulties. Students will be awarded grades based on their performance in two exams and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 470. Comparative Foreign Policy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman IV (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Any 100-level course in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the advantages and disadvantages of alternative approaches to foreign policy analysis. Particular attention is given to assessing approaches that attempt to explain behavior, such as spending in alliances, without reference to the states' domestic political systems; to those that emphasize the key role of internal political processes in explaining how states behave internationally, and to those that suggest that for many states similarities across issue area may be more crucial in defining the policy process than the nature of the states themselves. There is a midterm, a paper, and the final exam.

Textbook:

  • Reconstructing Realpolitik. Frank Wayman & Paul Diehl. ISBN:047208268X. Michigan.
  • Behavior, Culture and Conflict in World Politics. William Zimmerman & Harold K. Jacobson. ISBN:0472104535. Michigan.
  • Public Opinion and American Foreign Policy. Ole Holsti. ISBN:0472066196. Michigan.
  • Man, the State and War. Kenneth Waltz. ISBN:0231085648. Columbia.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 472. International Security Affairs.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Francis W Wayman Jr (fwayman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. (3). Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~fwayman/472SYW01.htm

The course concerns the changing nature of East-West and North-South relations, examines the process by which American national security decisions are made, and treats alternative explanations of national security affairs. A special focus will be on the causes of modern wars, including the Arab-Israeli Conflict and the Persian Gulf War. Students should have taken an introductory course in international politics, such as PS 160. There will be three exams. Methods of instruction include lecture and discussion.

Texts:

  • The Scientific Study of Peace and War. John Vasquez & Marie Henehan. ISBN: 0669201057. Lexington.
  • Extended Deterrence and the Prevention of War. Paul Huth. ISBN: 0300041675. Yale.
  • Win, Lose, or Draw. Alan Stam. ISBN: 0472106821. Michigan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 482/Econ. 483. Positive Political Economy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yan Chen (yanchen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 401. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~yanchen/econ483/econ483.html

See Economics 483.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 483. American Political Parties and Electoral Problems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites: Poli. Sci. 111, 140, 410, or 411. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/polsci/483/001.nsf

In this class we seek a broad understanding of what the American political parties are, how they operate and how they evolved, and how they compare to parties in other countries. We will study them mainly in the context of presidential and congressional elections, although we will also consider local parties, party organization, and parties in legislatures. Students will be expected to read assigned books and articles and be prepared to discuss the material. Lecture and discussion will be the format.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sharon D Wright (sdwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One course in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will analyze the ways in which organized interest groups have mobilized their members, increased their voter participation, elected their preferred candidates, and changed American policies.

Textbooks:

  • The Politics of Minority Children. Wilbur C. Rich. ISBN:0275954897. Praeger.
  • Social Movements and American Political Institutions. Anne N. Costain & Andrew S. McFarland. ISBN:0847683583. Rowman & Littlefield.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 487. Psychological Perspectives on Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cara Wong (cjwong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Explanations of political phenomena often rest on psychological assumptions. Studies of leadership, decision-making, socialization, public opinion and voting, violence and revolution, propaganda and persuasion all have a psychological base. The purpose of this lecture course is to survey major currents of theoretical and empirical work in the psychological analysis of politics. Extensive background in political science and psychology courses is NOT required, nor is the course part of a departmental sequence. Grades will be based on examinations and at least one paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 001 – Political Elites and Leadership. (Credits?)

Instructor(s): Judith S Kullberg (kullberg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In all nations, a very small percentage of the population dominates politics and the policy process, making decisions that directly or indirectly affect the lives of all citizens. This sub-population of officials and the politically influential may be conceived of as a more or less coherent group, as the "political elite." Because of their access to power and resources, the interests, motivations, behavior, and values of political elites and individual leaders are significant variables in the determination of political outcomes.

This course will survey theories of political elites and leadership and address questions central to the study of politics: Why do leaders and elites emerge in most social groups and in all societies? What are the origins of power and authority? What is the relationship between political actors and the state? Are certain types of individuals more likely to seek power and to succeed in politics? What role do leaders and elites play in shaping events and history? By exploring the research conducted on leaders and elites around the globe, the course will also examine how historical, cultural, and institutional factors shape and constrain elite behavior.

  • Political Elites and Leadership. James MacGregor Burns. ISBN: 0061319759. Harper Collins.
  • The Politics Presidents Make. Stephen Skowronek. ISBN: 0674689372. Belknap.
  • Diversity in the Power Elite: Have Women and Minorities Reached the Top?. Richard L. Szeigenhaft & G.W. Domhoff. ISBN: 0300080891. Yale.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 002 – Political Economy. (credits?)

Instructor(s): Robert Franzese, Jr. (franzese@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~franzese/SyllabiEtc.html

The course explores the impact of politics on the economy and of the economy on politics. Our approach to this broad subject matter will be positive as opposed to normative. I.e., we are interested in understanding, i.e., theoretically explicating, a set systematic relationships which may exist between features of the socio-politico-economic environment, not in commenting on the justness of those relationships. E.g., does the periodicity of elections induce cycles in economic policy and perhaps thereby outcomes, and, if so, how?

The course proceeds via an in-depth reading of six great books spanning the substantive realm of political economy:

  1. a broad theoretical overview (The Rise and Decline of Nations: Economic Growth, Stagflation, and Social Rigidities. Mancur Olson. ISBN:0300030797. Yale.),
  2. then studies of electoral politics and economic policy in the U.S. (Political Control of the Economy. Edward Tufte. ISBN:0691021805. Princeton.),
  3. partisan politics and economic policy in the U.S. (The American Political Economy: Macroeconomics and Electoral Politics. Douglas Hibbs. ISBN:0674027353. Harvard UP.),
  4. politics and economics in developed democracies (Governing the Economy: The Politics of State Intervention in Britain and France. Peter Hall. ISBN:0195205308. Oxford UP.) and in
  5. developing countries (Markets and States in Tropical Africa: The Political Basis of Agricultural Policies. Robert Bates. ISBN:0520052293. U Cal P. ), and
  6. the international economy and domestic politics (Commerce and Coalitions: How Trade Affects Domestic Political Alignments. Ronald Rogowski. ISBN:0691023301. Princeton.).

    Class meetings: partly lecture, partly discussion; Reading: 110 pp./wk. +/-; Writing: three short papers, one intermediate-length paper.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

    Section 003 – Environmental Politics. (3 credits).

    Instructor(s): David P Stuligross (dstuligr@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    People around the world have never been more aware that human development has a variety of negative environmental effects, yet such development continues. What are the policies in various countries that challenge (or reinforce) that developmental path; and what are the sources of political access available to individuals and political communities that seek to change (or retain) the status quo?

    This upper division course will provide students with analytical tools to address these questions in a broadly comparative perspective. First, we will use a variety of political-economic methods to evaluate the politics of environment in general way. These methods will be supplemented with detailed country studies that will show how, where, when, and why political action yields particular policy outcomes. Next, we will use the tools developed in a single-country context to evaluate variations in environmental policy and environmental politics across countries in several issue areas. Finally, we will probe the ways in which politics in one country influences policies elsewhere: international linkages among communities, interest groups, and national governments.

    Text: Environmental Policy: New Directions for the Twenty-First Century. Norman J Vig and Michael E. Kraft, eds.. ISBN: 1568023413. CQ Quarterly.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

    Section 004 – The Politics of Fascism and Right-Wing Movements. (3 credits.) Meets with German 499.001 and Sociology 495.007

    Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See German 499.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    POLSCI 512/Soc. 512. Practicum in Survey Research.

    Section 001 – Topic?

    Instructor(s): Michael Couper

    Prerequisites: (4).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Sociology 512.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    POLSCI 529/Public Policy 529. Statistics.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Aliaga Martha B (aliaga@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Prior coursework in calculus or concurrent enrollment in Math 413, and permission of instructor. Previous coursework in statistics is not required. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Public Policy Studies 529.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    POLSCI 592. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

    Instructor(s): Helen Graves (hmgraves@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Two courses in political science at the 400 level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

    Credits: (2-6).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The Political Science Department sponsors an upper division, juniors and seniors, Political Internship Program, Political Science 592, worth 3 credit hours. Students are placed with Legislators (Republicans and Democrats in Lansing), with Federal election officials in the Senate and Congress from Michigan, the Michigan Executive, the Courts (at all levels, local and Federal), the bureaucracy (at all levels), legal profession, interest groups, private sector (such as Governmental Affairs of the Major Auto companies) and international placements such a Canadian Consulate, as well as the Media.

    Students are in placements for 16 hours a week. They write a Political Journal encompassing a daily log of activities, two questions from the newspaper relating to the placement, new language and a quote of the week. In addition, they do 3 interviews…one with a staff member, one with the head of their agency/office, and one with a political actor. Additional assignments include their goals for the internship, their resume, and acknowledgment letters at the end of the internship. The interns attend 5 Seminars with the Director. Lansing interns attend 6 brown bag luncheon Seminars and Detroit interns attend two brown bag luncheon Seminars. On average, each intern will write approximately 80 to 100 pages. Readings include:

    • Asking the Right Questions. Neil Browne. ISBN:0130891347. Prentice Hall.
    • Oran's Dictionary of the Law. Daniel Oran. ISBN:0766817423. Delmar.
    • One L: The Turbulent True Story of a First Year at Harvard Law. Scott Turow. ISBN:0446673781. Warner.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    POLSCI 598. Mathematics for Political Scientists.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Scott E Page (spage@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. The level of mathematical sophistication presumed is high school algebra. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course attempts to equip students with basic mathematical tools necessary for the study of advanced statistical methods, game theory, and other types of formal modeling. Topics include set theory, matrix algebra, differential calculus, optimization, and integral calculus. The level of mathematical sophistication presumed is high school algebra.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 608. The History of Political Science.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Arlene W Saxonhouse (awsaxon@umich.edu) , Christopher H Achen (achen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course surveys the origins and development of political science as a field of study. A first goal is to help students learn to stand back from popular contemporary theories and methods and to evaluate them critically as the result of understanding the emerging questions and issues they were developed to address. Seeing one's own subfield in historical perspective is an indispensable part of developing theoretical judgment and confidence. Equally important, the course surveys political science as a whole, exhibiting certain thematic continuities and shared questions not otherwise visible. At present, ongoing debates about democracy, participation, citizenship, power, institutions, and the role of social science are often confined to single subfields, making the work inbred. By giving students a broader perspective on the discipline, this course encourages students to integrate themes across subfields and thereby understand how subfields can enrich each other.

    Texts:

    • A Preface to Democratic Theory. Robert A. Dahl. ISBN: 0226134261. Chicago.
    • The Foundations of Political Science. John Burgess. ISBN: 1560007117. Transaction.
    • Language, Truth, and Logic. A.J. Ayer. ISBN: 0486200108. Dover.
    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 617. Proseminar in Legislative Behavior.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Richard L Hall (rlhall@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This seminar is intended for Ph.D. students in the social sciences interested in legislative behavior and institutions. We will focus heavily on the literature on the U.S. Congress, which is the focus of most of the theoretical scholarship. This is an intensive critical reading course. We will also discuss research ideas, design, data, and methods, and the main written assignment will be a research design. Prerequisite: PS 611.

    Texts:

    • Positive Theories of Congressional Institutions. Kenneth Shepsle & Barry Weingast, eds. ISBN: 0472083198. Michigan.
    • Turning the Legislative Thumbscrew. Douglas Dion. ISBN: 0472108204. Michigan.
    • The Concept of Representation. Hannah Pitkin. ISBN: 0520021568. Univ. of California.
    • Legislative Leviathan. Gary Cox and Matthew McCubbins. ISBN: 0520072200. Univ. of California.
    • Information and Legislative Organization. Keith Krehbiel. ISBN: 0472064606. Michigan.
    • Congressional Procedures and the Policy Process. Walter Oleszek. ISBN: 1568024487. CQ Press.
    • Delegating Powers. David Epstein and Sharyn O'Halloran. ISBN: 052166960X. Cambridge.
    • Home Style. Richard F. Fenno, Jr. ISBN: 0673394409. Addison-Wesley.
    • Outside Lobbying. Ken Kollman. ISBN: 0691017417. Princeton.
    • Turf Wars. David C. King. ISBN: 0226436241. Chicago.
    • Gaining Access. John Mark Hansen. ISBN: 0226315568. Chicago.
    • Pivotal Politics. Keith Krehbiel. ISBN: 0226452727. Chicago.
    • Race, Redistricting, and Representation. David Canon. ISBN: 0226092712. Chicago.
    • The Logic of Congressional Action. R. Douglas Arnold. ISBN: 0300056591. Yale Univ.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 620/Comm. 620. Research in Politics and the Mass Media.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Nicholas A Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Communication Studies 620.001.

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    POLSCI 621. Proseminar in State and Local Government and Administration.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Sharon Wright (sdwright@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The State and Local politics course will examine a number of issues and dilemmas for local and state officeholders as they govern in their respective regions. We will spend a considerable amount of time discussing contemporary urban and rural issues in states.

    Textbooks:

    • The Urban Growth Machine: Critical Perspectives, Two Decades Later. Andrew E. G. Jonas & David Wilson, eds. ISBN:0791442608. State Univ. of NY.
    • Who Governs? Democracy and Power in an American City. Robert Dahl. ISBN:0300000510. Yale Univ.
    • Theories of Urban Politics. David Judge, Gerry Stoker, & Harold Wolman, eds. ISBN:0803988656. Sage.
    • City Politics: Private Power and Public Policy. Todd Swanstrom, Dennis Judd, ed. ISBN:032101099X. Addison-Wesley.
    • Political Organizations. James Wilson. ISBN:069104385X.
    • Challenging Uneven Development: An Urban Agenda for the 1990s. Philip W. Nyden, Wim Wiewel, eds. ISBN:0813516595. Rutgers.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 635. Proseminar in Public Administration and Public Policy.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Anne M Lin (annlin@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/polsci/635/001.nsf

    In political science, public policy is often seen as a byproduct of the political process. But public policy can also be thought of as a set of resources for the creation of politics. In this model, policy as created by lawmakers is but a starting point for revision, reinterpretation, and (often uneven) application. This course will investigate the politics of public policy by looking at how how institutional and intergovernmental coordination, bureaucracy and bureaucratic culture, and interactions with the judiciary, with citizens, and with the market affect the implementation and administration of policies. Students will write several research memos over the term, and develop a research design or review article for the final project.

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    POLSCI 638/Public Policy 638. Field Training.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Ann Chih Lin (annlin@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). May be elected for credit twice.

    Credits: (1-6).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Public Policy Studies 638.001.

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    POLSCI 643. Ethnicity and Politics.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Zvi Y Gitelman (zvigitel@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course examines several aspects of the relationships between ethnicity and politics: how and why nations and ethnic groups arise; how and why they make claims on political systems; how different types of political systems manage multiethnic societies. It surveys Marxist, Liberal and western social scientific approaches to ethnicity and analyzes different modes of political management of ethnicity. These include: federalism, national-cultural autonomy, consociationalism and assimilationism. Citizenship policies and cultural policies are compared in different types of systems. Materials will be drawn primarily from the United States, Canada, the former USSR, Eastern and Western Europe, and Israel.

    Textbooks:

    • Nationalism. A.J. Hutchinson, A.D. Smith eds. ISBN:0192892606. Oxford.
    • National Identity (Ethnonationalism in Comparative Perspective. A.D. Smith. ISBN:0874172047. University of Nevada.

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    POLSCI 644. Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics.

    Section 001 – Russian Govt. & Politics

    Instructor(s): William Zimmerman IV (wzim@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A proseminar primarily concerned with analyzing the prospects for democratic and /or market transformations in post-Soviet Russia emphasizing the impact of change and continuity in Soviet and post-Soviet political culture and institutions. Students will be strongly encouraged to utilize mass and elite data sets in Zimmerman's possession in writing their term papers.

    Textbooks:

    • Transnational Citizens. Timothy Colton. ISBN:0674001532. Harvard.
    • Capitalism Russian Style. Thane Gustafson. ISBN:0521645956. Cambridge.
    • Growing Pains. Timothy Colton and J.F. Hugh. ISBN:0815715218. Brookings Institute.
    • Subversive Institutions. Valerie Bunce. ISBN:0521585929. Cornell.
    • Unarmed Forces: The Transnational Movement to End the Cold War. Matthew Evangelista. ISBN:0801436281. Cornell.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 648. Politics of Advanced Industrial Society.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Madeleine Hosli (mhosli@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course focuses on institutions and electoral systems in advanced industrial democracies. We will analyze effects of electoral systems, institutions and voter anticipation, and study government-formation processes in different democracies. We will be reading essential books such as MAKING VOTES COUNT by Gary Cox and Lijphart's ELECTORAL SYSTEMS AND PARTY SYSTEMS. In addition, we will study more traditional classifications of electoral systems according to Lijphart's PATTERNS OF DEMOCRACY, and the significance of coalitions in multi-party systems, reading Laver and Schofield's MULTIPARTY GOVERNMENT: THE POLITICS OF COALITION IN EUROPE. Laver and Shepsle's MAKING AND BREAKING GOVERNMENTS is another book that we will study in depth. Finally, we will read a selection of recent articles on electoral systems and their effects. Hence, this course aims to give a thorough introduction into a comparative analysis of electoral systems and institutions in advanced industrial societies.

    Texts:

    • Bicameralism. George Tsebelis. ISBN: 052158972X. Cambridge.
    • Making Votes Count: Strategic Coordination in the World's Electoral Systems. Gary Cox. ISBN: 0521585279. Cambridge.
    • Seats and Votes: The Effects and Determinants of Electoral Systems. Rein Taagepera. ISBN: 0300043198. Yale Univ.
    • Making and Breaking Governments: Cabinets and Legislatures in Parliamentary Democracies. Michael Laver. ISBN: 0521438365. Cambridge.
    • Interests, Institutions, and Information: Domestic Politics and International Relations. Helen Milner. ISBN: 0691011761. Princeton.
    • Democratic Commitments: Legislatures and International Cooperation. Lisa L. Martin. ISBN: 0691009244. Princeton.
    • Principles of Electoral Reform. Michael A.E. Drummett. ISBN: 0198292465. Oxford.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 650. Political Development.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Michael Ross (mlross@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This seminar will offer a comprehensive introduction to the field of comparative development, from the 1950's to the 1990's. We will critically review the major theoretical approaches to development, including modernization theory, dependency theory, state-society approaches, the new institutionalism, and post-structuralism; we will also consider the major substantive debates, covering democratization, the politics of economic policy, the role of international financial institutions, and the problems of nationalism and ethnic conflict.

    Texts:

    • Political Order in Changing Societies. Samuel Huntington. ISBN: 0300011717. Yale Univ..
    • Structure and Change in Economic History. Douglass North. ISBN: 039395241X. Norton.
    • Designing Social Inquiry. G. King, R. Keohane & S. Verba. ISBN: 0691034702. Princeton.
    • Democracy and Development. A. Przeworski, M. Alvarez, J.A. Cheibub & F. Limongi. ISBN: 0521790328. Cambridge.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 664. Research Strategy and Methods in World Politics.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Douglas W Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course focuses on research challenges confronting students of international politics. Most of the time nothing happens in international politics. Consequently, most international phenomena are rare events. Further, when these rare events do occur they are often strategically chosen to occur by one or more actors. When they don't occur it is often because they are strategically chosen not to occur. Appreciating the rare event nature of world politics and the strategic underpinnings of international action has important consequences for how we model and think about international affairs and for the inferences we can draw from our studies of world politics. In this class we will also address questions of operational definition and measurement of important concepts, while additionally reviewing what data readily exist for world politics researchers as well as considering independent data collection efforts. In order to see how well these concerns are taken into account in existing world politics research, students will have the opportunity to dissect published studies. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to produce research designs of their own during the latter part of the term.

    Text: Inquiry, Logic and International Politics. Benjamin Most and Harvey Starr. ISBN: 0872496309. Univ. of South Carolina.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 668. War in World Politics.

    Instructor(s): J. David Singer (jdsinger@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Given the central role that war has played in humanity's presence on earth, not to mention that of earlier primates, this type of large-scale violence merits the close attention of all social scientists. In previous years we have tended to focus mostly on inter-state war since the Napoleonic period, but given the increased research into much earlier periods as well as into intra-state or civil war, this term's work will flow from a modestly broader agenda. But as in the past we will continue to examine some of the better traditional literature while giving heavier emphasis to the more scientific work devoted to the explanation of war. To be quite explicit, we will be more interested in the "causes" of war than in the conduct or the consequences of war.

    Textbooks:

    • The Scientific Study of Peace and War. John Vasquez & Marie Henehan. ISBN:0669201057. Lexington Books.
    • The Process of War: Advancing the Scientific Study of War. Stuart Bremer & Thomas Cusack. ISBN:2884491775. Gordon and Breach.
    • Nations at War: A Scientific Study of International Conflict. Daniel Geller & J. David Singer. ISBN:0521629063. Cambridge University.
    • What do We Know About War?. John Vasquez, ed. ISBN:0847699277. Rowman & Littlefield.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 668. War in World Politics.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): J David Singer (jdsinger@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~cowproj/

    No Description Provided

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    POLSCI 681. Proseminar in Empirical Theory and Method.

    Section 001 – Strategic Models of Politics.

    Instructor(s): Jennifer L Bednar (jbednar@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will introduce you to the use of formal models in political science. After some introductory discussions on utility theory, social choice, and spatial voting models, we will devote most of our time to the fundamentals of game theory, analysis of strategic interaction. We will also consider how institutions affect the decisions made by strategic agents. Time permitting we will discuss formal approaches critical of many of game theory's assumptions, including evolutionary game theory, bounded rationality, and computational modeling. The course has no prerequisites.

    Texts:

    • Games of Strategy. Dixit & Skeath. ISBN: 0393974219. Norton.
    • Game Theory Evolving. Gintis. ISBN: 0691009430. Princeton.
    • Liberalism Against Populism. Riker. ISBN: 0881333670. Waveland.
    • Analyzing Politics. Shepsle & Bonchek. ISBN: 0393971074. Norton.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

    Section 001 – Gender, Race and Politics.

    Instructor(s): Nancy E Burns (nburns@umich.edu) , Donald R Kinder (drkinder@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    In this course, we build a bridge between the study of gender and the study of race. For conceptual tools, we will draw upon these two literatures within political science, and we will incorporate approaches to gender and race from history, philosophy, psychology, sociology. We take these two topics up together because the comparison between the two pushes us to see questions that have been asked in one field that have simply never come up in the other and allows us to borrow theoretical tools developed to understand one hierarchy to think about the other. We will draw heavily, but not exclusively, from the literatures on American politics, public opinion, and political action.

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    POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

    Section 003 – Courts and Administrations – State.

    Instructor(s): Noga Morag-Levine (noga@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The distinct place of courts in the evolution and current practices of administrative government in the United States is the focus of this seminar. Using examples drawn primarily from environmental law and policy the course will explore three primary questions:

    1. What underlying conceptions of the regulatory authority of the state account for differences between courts' influence on policy making processes in the United States and other advanced industrialized countries?
    2. What are the arguments for and against American-styled judicial policy making, in terms of both democratic theory and institutional capacity?
    3. How are differences between national policy making styles tied to variations in levels of judicial oversight, and to what extent is this divergence eroding in the face of the globalization of both markets and law?

    The course seeks to link legal-theoretical, comparative, and public policy inquiries and is directed at students whose primary interests lie in any of these areas.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

    Section 004 – Development of American Political Institutions, 1865-1945

    Instructor(s): Daniel P Carpenter (dancarp@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dancarp/ps688.htm

    An intensive, theoretically-driven survey of developments in the party system, Congress and the bureaucratic state in the United States, from Reconstruction through the New Deal. The solidification of the two-party system, the rise of congressional committee power and the seniority system, the building of the modern budgetary process, and the origins of the welfare state and regulatory state will be studied using several theoretical approaches, including transaction-costs institutionalism, historical institutionalism, party-based perspectives, critical-theoretical perspectives, and others.

    Institutions are the formal and informal structures that shape our policy and our political experience. This course surveys the historical evolution of three American political institutions – the party system, Congress, and the bureaucratic state. We will cover the period from Reconstruction through the New Deal, or 1870-1940, roughly speaking. Throughout the quarter we will attempt to answer several core questions concerning American political institutions. What are institutions and how do they shape our political life? How did we get the institutions we have today – the two party system, the congressional seniority system, interest groups, the welfare state, the regulatory state? How can we account for institutional change? And how can attention to the history of American political institutions help us to understand the dilemmas now facing the American political system?

    To address these questions we will study closely important facets of the three institutions listed above. Among other things, we will ask how changing party structures led to voting realignments, we will trace the rise of the seniority system and committee structures in Congress, and we will gauge the implications of the professionalization of the American civil service. In other words, we will study "institutions within institutions."

    Format: I will on occasion introduce the week's readings with a 20- to 30-minute lecture each week. We will then discuss the readings for the remaining 90 minutes of the session. (Sometimes, we'll do it he other way around!)

    Papers: Four papers are required for this class.

    Course Papers. In each of the three empirical modules, you will be required to write a 7-10 page paper which does three things:

    1. critically examines an argument or two from our reading list for the week;
    2. interprets the development considered in the piece through an alternative theoretical lens, and considers the strengths and weaknesses of this interpretation; and
    3. MOST IMPORTANT, offers a considered suggestion for how the historical research could have been improved.

    These papers should be completed the morning of our class and distributed to the rest of your classmates by e-mail.

    Final Paper. If you are taking this class for credit, you will also be required to write a final paper that examines a specific research question in our course. My request here will be rather demanding. I want you to write a paper of 20-25 pages that would serve as a template – with an argument, "hypotheses" and a proposed historical research design, plus some of the research conducted and interpreted – that comes as close as possible to a publishable paper in American political development. By the end of the first month you should have settled upon a research question, or at least an historical question that you are interested and that you think has interesting theoretical implications. You are entirely welcome to build this paper from one of your three course discussion papers. Due sometime in April.

    Readings: The course is designed so that you will read one or two book chapters or articles for each class lecture. The following books will comprise the principal texts used during the quarter. Other readings will be collected in a course packet available from Dollar Bill and some have been put on reserve at Hatcher. Those marked with an asterisk ("*") are available at the Shaman Drum.

    * Amenta, Edwin. 1998. Bold Relief: Institution Politics and the Origins of Modern Social Policy (Princeton: Princeton University Press).

    * Banaszak, Lee Ann. 1999. Why Movements Succeed or Fail (Princeton: Princeton University Press).

    * Beisel, Nicola. 1997. Imperiled Innocents: Anthony Comstock and Family Reproduction in Victorian America, (Princeton: Princeton University Press).

    * Bensel, Richard F. 1990. Yankee Leviathan, (New York; Cambridge University Press).

    * Carpenter, Daniel P. 2001. The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy: Networks, Reputations and Policy Innovation in Executive Agencies, 1862-1928 (Princeton: Princeton University Press), selections from advance copy.

    * Clemens, Elizabeth. 1998. The People's Lobby: Organizational Repertoires and the Rise of Interest Group Politics in the United States, 1890-1925 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).

    * Finegold, Kenneth, and Theda Skocpol. 1995. State and Party in America's New Deal, (Madison; University of Wisconsin Press).

    * Hansen, John Mark. 1991. Gaining Access: Congress and the Farm Lobby, 1919-1981 (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press).

    * Lieberman, Robert. 1998. Shifting the Color Line: Race and the American Welfare State, (Cambridge: Harvard University Press).

    * North, Douglass C. 1990. Institutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance, (New York; Cambridge University Press).

    * Rodgers, Daniel T. 1998. Atlantic Crossings: Social Politics in a Progressive Age, (Harvard University Press).

    * Sanders. Elizabeth. 1999. Roots of Reform: Farmers, Laborers and the American State, 1870-1916 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).

    * Shefter, Martin. 1994. Political Parties and the State: the American Historical Experience, (Princeton: Princeton University Press).

    * Skocpol, Theda. 1992. Protecting Soldiers and Mothers, (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press).

    * Skowronek, Stephen L. 1981. Building a New American State: The Expansion of National Administrative Capacities, (New York: Cambridge University Press).

    * Sparrow, Bartholomew. 1995. From the Outside In: World War II and the American State, (Princeton: Princeton University Press).

    Stewart, Charles III. 1990. Budget Reform Politics: The Reform of the House Appropriations Process, 1883-1922, (New York; Cambridge University Press).

    * Sundquist, James L. 1983. Dynamics of the Party System: Alignment and Realignment of Political Parties in the United States (Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 692. Directed Reading.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor required. (1-6).

    Credits: (1-6).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    POLSCI 694. Qualitative Research Methods.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Anne M Lin (annlin@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/polsci/694/001.nsf

    This proseminar will introduce students to a range of positivist and interpretive uses of qualitative methods; to the design and evaluation of research employing qualitative methods; and to techniques of qualitative data collection, analysis, and writing. It will also help students develop a sense of the possibilities and limits of qualitative data and an understanding of their professional obligations as researchers.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    POLSCI 699. Statistical Methods in Political Research II.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Robert J Franzese Jr (franzese@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Pol. Sci. 599 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is an introduction to the quantitative methodology of the social sciences. A thorough introduction to linear-regression analysis is complemented by a more preliminary introduction to the analysis of non-linear functional relationships (especially those associated with binary dependent variables). The course aims to teach students how to construct, estimate, and interpret empirical models which match their theoretical counterparts and maximize leverage from available data for the empirical evaluation of those theoretical propositions. Topics include the classic linear regression model, extensions thereof, specifications and data issues therein (such as omitted variables, multicollinearity, and multiplicative interactions), criticism of such models, and some introduction to time-series and binary-dependent-variable models.

    Examples will be drawn from the social sciences with emphasis on political science. Frequent homework exercises will give students experience with the practical application of techniques learned. There will also be a final exam and a paper. The prerequisite is a background in basic mathematics at the level of PS 598 along with some familiarity with elementary statistics (PS 599), or permission of instructor.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 701. Selected Concepts in Political Theory.

    Section 001 – 20th-Century Democratic Theory

    Instructor(s): Claudia M Ritter (ritterc@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    We will read the debates on democracy in the 20th century, which focus on dealing with difference and the problems of multicultural societies. Rawls' theory will be taken as a starting point followed by a series of attempts to mediate between liberal and communitarian positions (among others Walzer, Habermas, Gutmann). The French postmodern critique of liberal democracy (Mouffe, Castoriadis, Leford) will be discussed as well as the feminist critique of these debates (Phillips, Young). Also the ongoing discourse on identity politics will be studied. The course will integrate research on the politics of ethnic/cultural/race groups in the U.S., which is often neglected in the theoretical debates on democracy. We will in particular include readings from African-American and Latino Studies. There is plenty to read. No previous knowledge of political theory is required.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 734/Public Policy 732/Education 764. Public Policy in Postsecondary Education.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Donald E Heller

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Public Policy Studies 732.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    POLSCI 741. Seminar in Comparative Politics.

    Section 001 – LAW & DEVELOPMENT.

    Instructor(s): Jennifer Anne Widner (jwidner@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course surveys some of the important debates in the contemporary study of law and development. The opening classes ask the questions: What is law?, Under what conditions does law matter?, and What do we mean by the rule of law? The readings introduce some of the main features of developing country legal systems and the challenges legal pluralism, resource scarcity, and colonial legacies create for the administration of justice. Subsequent weeks seek to understand the significance of substantive law for various aspects of development. The focus is on the significance of property rights for investment and invention, legal frameworks for competitive markets, and the enforcement of civil and political liberties that support free exchange of information and pursuit of accountable government. The final section of the course will focus either on the implications of new constitutions for development or on OHADA, WTO, and other international agreements. Readings include selections from legal history, anthropology, economics, political science, and law scholarship. Each student is expected to prepare three discussion papers during the term and to participate actively in the conversation.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 741. Seminar in Comparative Politics.

    Section 002 – Research Design in Comparative Politics

    Instructor(s): Mary Gallagher (metg@umich.edu) , Jennifer Widner (jwidner@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course provides a basic introduction to the challenges of research design and research method in comparative politics. It supplements the Proseminar in Comparative Politics, which focuses on theory-building. It offers a glimpse of important debates and fosters self-consciousness about the trade-offs that are an inevitable part of research and writing. It also introduces some basic practical skills and the challenges of fieldwork. There is some overlap with 680, but the course uses different materials and tackles some subjects that 680 does not address explicitly. The classes also profile interesting contributions in thematic areas of new importance to the comparative politics sub-field. The course is designed primarily for second- or third-year students who are beginning their own original work, but it is open to others.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 793. Methods Seminar.

    Section 001 – Complexity Theory in the Social Sciences. (2 credits).

    Instructor(s): Robert Axelrod (axe@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3).

    Credits: (2-3).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~axe/complexity_syllabus.htm

    Complexity theory is an interdisciplinary approach to understanding dynamic processes involving the interaction of many actors. This course focuses on agent-based modeling that is one of the primary methods of analyzing complex adaptive systems. Agent-based modeling involves specifying how individual agents (such as people, nations, or organizations) interact with each other and with their environment. Computer simulation is then used to discover the emergent properties of the model, and thereby gain insights into dynamic processes that would be too difficult to model with standard mathematical techniques.

    The course will consider a wide variety of applications of agent-based models to the social sciences, including residential segregation, cultural change, social influence, war, alliances, nation formation, organizational change, elections, and markets.

    There will be four small exercises, and one major project selected by the student. Knowledge of a programming language is required. The course is intended for graduate students in a wide variety of fields, not just political science.

    A course pack is available from Dollar Bill Copy, 611 Church St, 665-9200.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    POLSCI 795/REES 795/Hist. 795/Econ. 795/Russ. 795/Geog. 795. Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies.

    Instructor(s): Jane R Burbank (jburbank@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 795.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    POLSCI 825/Hist. 825/Anthro. 825/Chinese 825/Econ. 825/Soc. 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

    Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See History 825.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    POLSCI 892. Directed Research.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-6).

    Credits: (1-6).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

    Check Times, Location, and Availability


    POLSCI 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    POLSCI 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


    Undergraduate Course Listings for POLSCI.


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