College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Sociology


This page was created at 7:58 AM on Tue, Jan 30, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Sociology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for SOC

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Sociology.


SOC 212. Sports and Society.

Section 001 Sports and Culture in Advanced Industrial Democracies. Meets with German 449.001.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See German 449.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 405. Theory in Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Betsy Cullum-Swan

Prerequisites: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 305. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 410. The American Jewish Community.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Schoem (dschoem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine current issues and ongoing controversies within the American Jewish Community as it reviews broadly the sociological literature on American Jewry. Students will study topics such as Jewish identity, intergroup and intragroup relations, group survival and community structure and organization as the class explores the efforts, conflicts, and struggles of American Jews as they strive to maintain themselves in a pluralistic society. The course will be conducted in seminar style with an expectation of active student participation and presentations on book reviews and research papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 423/Amer. Cult. 421. Social Stratification.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Markku Kivinen (mkivinen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Why middle class kids get middle class jobs? Why some people are alienated in modern societies or are they? What are the causes of social inequality? Are social classes based on division of labor, exploitation or domination?

Social inequality, stratification and class are a central concern in sociological research. On the other hand class concepts are also used in more practical terms in everyday classifications or in political debates. In the United States many politicians tend to refer to the interests of the middle class. In the European welfare states the working class and the peasantry seem to have played a major role. In the Soviet Union class was much more than just an abstract category of sociological analysis. Class membership was a profoundly moral issue, often a matter of life and death none more so than after Dzherzhinsky issued his ukase that all class enemies were to be liquidated even in the absence of any hard evidence of subversion. People could now be executed on the grounds of their class background. The idea was for the revolution to dispose the exploiting classes; once they were out of the way, all other social problems would sort out themselves.

If classes served as an explanation and justification for everything in Soviet ideology, in the United States the major stream of stratification research was status attainment approach. Social inequalities were seen to be grounded in a functional division of labor. People who have the most demanding jobs and positions in society were to be paid more so that the best people could be recruited in these jobs. There is not supposed to be any class conflicts in society, just different kinds of jobs and different kinds of privileges attached to different positions.

In this course the American stratification research is put in a broad comparative perspective. We start with different traditions of stratification research. Elements of class theorizing proposed by Marx and Weber are linked with contemporary theories. Neo-Marxist theories on exploitation are confronted with Weberian conceptual starting points, based on market capacities, domination or cultural capital. Parsons view on professions is shown to be fundamentally relevant for later American theories of middle class formation. Different modern approaches are analyzed as scientific research programs with their basic assumptions and strategies for empirical work. The open questions and anomalies of each theoretical system are also discussed.

In the second part of the course we analyze several empirical studies on class and stratification in the United States. Labor market segmentation, social networks as well as issues of ethnic and racial stratification are studied by using paradigmatic empirical research examples as starting points. A special session is devoted to the relationship between gender and class.

In the third part of the course American stratification and class system is compared with other kinds of social realities. We analyze the class hierarchy in state socialist societies as well as the different class systems in European welfare states. We also ask the specificity of Indian caste system and the reasons for its inertia until modern times. Especially we make an effort to understand the stratification processes in East European societies in transition.

Course requirements: This course should give the student the ability to follow theoretical discussion and evaluate empirical analysis on social inequality. The course is divided into three sections. For each of the sections students are supposed to concentrate their writing and comments on some specific problem which are introduced in the very beginning of the course. The students are required to keep a course diary which ends up in proposing conclusions or indicating open issues. The dates for which diaries are due to be submitted are indicated for each section. Students will be given an opportunity to choose which particular problem they will concentrate their work. Consequently, they are expected not only to repeat the readings but also present own arguments and ideas. Once during the academic term, each group of three students will lead a discussion on their topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 426/Poli. Sci. 428/Asian Studies 428/Phil. 428. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mary Gallagher (metg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Political Science 428.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 444. The American Family.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa D Pearce (lisapear@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines past and present forms of families in America from a sociological perspective. Changes over time in definitions of family structure, roles, and relationships will be considered. The course will analyze how American families are influenced by other social dynamics such as race/ethnicity, gender, work, and religion. Some of the specific components of family life covered in this course will be romantic partner choice, cohabitation, marriage, divorce, and childbearing.

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SOC 445. Comparative Family Systems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hiromi Ono (hono@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/soc/445/001.nsf

Sociology 445 explores union (i.e., marriage and cohabitation) formation and dissolution from a cross-national comparative perspective. It focuses on the relationship between unions and men and women's work and family roles. The aim of this course is to gain an understanding of the gendered processes underlying union formation and dissolution. Classes will be run in a research seminar format. Class time will be devoted to discussions surrounding assigned readings and video viewing, with some presentations. The questions raised in the course will include: 1) do men have to be good breadwinners, and do women have to be good housekeepers, in order for marriages to form and continue?; 2) can we compare marriage and divorce across countries?; and 3) are societies moving in the direction of becoming marriage-free?

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SOC 447/WS 447. Sociology of Gender.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dana M Greene (dmgreene@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Who are we as men, women, boys, and girls?
What is gender?
How do we identify ourselves as gendered beings?
How do we become socialized as male or female?
How are femininity and masculinity constructed?
How do men and women "experience" gender differently?
How is gender conceptualized differently in non-Western societies?
How do race, class, sexuality, religion, and nationality interact with gender?

This course will take an global (international) perspective to examine the realm of gender relations, androcentrism, gender polarization, multicultural feminist thought, the influx of gay, lesbian, and transgender studies, and the rise and critiques of postmodernism and identity politics in international perspective. More specifically, this course will challenge the student to critically examine the theoretical and empirical issues relevant to the sociological study of gender-work-family intersections, the feminization of poverty, and gender inequality, among others. Attention will be given to historical and cultural context, empirical research findings, and theoretical developments in studying issues relevant to gendered life in contemporary Western and non-Western societies.

Course requirements include a take-home midterm examination, two writing assignments, and a final project.

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SOC 450. Political Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 454. Law and Social Organization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel H Sharphorn (dsharphn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to examine the organization of law in society and the relationships between law and society. The approach will be primarily from a sociological perspective; however, we will also explore the views of legal scholars, anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, and others. While the course will be a survey of "law and social organization" in general, we will focus on current topics of special interest as a device for our study: the death penalty, rape laws, affirmative action and anti-discrimination laws, university rules and regulations, and others. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of the extent of the study of law and social organization and the leading theories and ideas about it, and will be asked to think critically and independently about legal systems and the role of law in society.

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SOC 455/Rel. 455. Religion and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terence James McGinn (tjmcginn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/soc/455/001.nsf

Religion is centrally involved in many of the social conflicts and movements that fill today's headlines: as a social identity, as a core set of beliefs, as a basis for social judgment, as a motivation for action.

This course uses sociological methods to explore the interplay of sacred and secular in modern society. What is religion and the religious? How is the sense of the sacred affected by the social? In what ways does religion, in turn, affect other areas of social life?

The class uses a variety of learning formats including discussions, study groups, lectures, films, and student research presentations. Required readings are primarily in course pack form and include the writings of both classic and contemporary sociologists ranging from Weber and Durkheim to Berger, Bellah, and Wuthnow.

Students' understanding and integration of the material is demonstrated through a series of quizzes, three short papers, and a group presentation project.

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SOC 460. Social Change.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~eian/Soc460syllabus.pdf

This course explores the relationship between labor movements and fundamental social change through the lens of the North American experience. It compares the ways in which organized labor contributed to, and was affected by, fundamental changes in the political economies of Canada, the U.S., and Mexico in the 20th century. Particular attention is paid to the nature and causes of the economic and political transformations of the last quarter century. This entails an exploration of the meaning and significance of economic "globalization," the "neoliberal" policy paradigm, and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). A central concern is the significance of these changes for worker rights, union power, and trends in wages and working conditions in three economic sectors: autos, apparel, and agriculture. The course considers debates over proposals to link core worker rights to trade agreements and corporate codes of conduct, to raise minimum wages, and to increase restrictions on child labor. This is a three credit course, but students will receive extra credit if they choose to participate in a one week field trip to the Mexican border region during Spring Break. This trip will be organized and led by the instructor, in cooperation with Border Links.

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SOC 463/Comm. Studies 485. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nojin Kwak (kwak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/comm/485/001.nsf

See Communication Studies 463.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 465/Psych. 488. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andre Modigliani (modigli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Introductory sociology or introductory psychology as a social science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will examine how people become social deviants and how relevant social institutions contribute to this process. Early portions will examine the legal enforcement, judicial and corrections systems which together determine who will be designated deviant and with what consequences. Later portions will focus on particular forms of deviance (e.g., delinquency, theft, fraud, rape) with a view to understanding and evaluating the several theoretical perspectives that have been proposed to explain their genesis and perpetuation.

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SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 001 SOCIAL AND POLITICAL TRANSFORMATIONS IN MODERN MIDDLE EAST HISTORY.

Instructor(s): Selim Deringil

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 003 Sex/Gender/Sexualities: Sex, Gender, and the Body. Meets with Women's Studies 483.007

Instructor(s): Karen Sue Honeycutt (khoneyct@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/soc/495/003.nsf

Are there more than two "genders"?
What is the significance of the "Naked Mile" for studies of gender & the body?
How are children's bodies "gendered," both by themselves and by others?
What is the significance of games children play on schoolyards?
Are children sexual beings?
Why are so many women on diets?
How are our notions about beauty constructed?
Can you be a feminist if you are concerned about your appearance?
How is masculinity constructed within the men's movement?
How do men and women's experiences of their aging bodies differ?
Is sexuality biologically determined or "socially constructed"?
How does socialization affect sexuality and male/female relationships?
What constitutes "sexual harassment"?
What does "rape" mean?
Is prostitution degrading to women or empowering?
How do new reproductive technologies construct women's bodies in new ways?

We will explore these and/or similar questions this term in Soc. 495, Sex/Gender/Sexualities: Gender and the Body. Throughout the term, we will ask how gender is constructed, what the main causes and consequences are of gender inequality with regard to issues about the body, how issues of power come into play, and how various social identities such as social class race, sexuality, age, and others intersect with gender in "embodying" lived experiences. Course requirements include attendance & participation (25%), writing assignment choice of options including keeping an "intellectual journal" or completing sociological projects (25%), and two exams (25% each). (25%), and two exams (25% each). NOTE: if this class is full, please email the instructor to be placed on her waiting list.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 004 CONTINUITY AND CHANGE IN THE US FAMILY. Prerequisites: two sociology courses and one statistics course.

Instructor(s): Pamela J Smock (pjsmock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar grapples with issues surrounding U.S. families and social change. We review the scholarly research as well as popular writings on topics that are critical to understanding contemporary family patterns as well as the future of the family. These topics include: the rise of divorce, cohabitation, and single parenthood; gay and lesbian families; racial and ethnic differences in family patterns; dual-earner couples; the gender division of unpaid labor within families; and the "family values" debate. The central objectives of this course are for students to: (1) be able to evaluate the popular and academic discourse surrounding family change; and, (2) attain a comprehensive understanding of U.S. family patterns and the ways these patterns are embedded in society. The course is organized as a seminar and active involvement of all class participants is expected.

Prerequisites: two sociology courses and one statistics course

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SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 005 Race & Racialization In The U.S. MEETS WITH AMERICAN CULTURE 401.001

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 401.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 007 The Politics of Fascism and Right-Wing Movements. Meets with German 499.001 and Political Science 489.004.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See German 499.001.

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SOC 504/Amer. Cult. 504 American Immigration: Sociological Perspectives.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; seniors with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 506. Theory and Practice.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James S House (jimhouse@umich.edu), Fatma Muge Gocek

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 512/Poli. Sci. 512. Practicum in Survey Research.

Section 001 Detroit Area Study

Instructor(s): Michael Couper

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/soc/DAS/index.html

No Description Provided

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SOC 515. Economic Sociology and Organizations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark S Mizruchi (mizruchi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mizruchi/econg.pdf

Economic sociology is concerned with the social bases of economic behavior. Although the field contains a wide range of perspectives, economic sociologists generally share the view that economic action is social action and that economic institutions are socially constructed and culturally and historically specific. This class is the core course for the Economic Sociology and Organizations program in the Department of Sociology. The course will introduce students to the key issues in the field. Topics include classical and neoclassical economic models of human action and sociological alternatives, the history of the large corporation, transaction cost economics, the power, neo-institutional, and embeddedness models of firm behavior, sociological models of production, labor, and financial markets, the determinants and consequences of interfirm relations, and the role of economic institutions in the larger society.

Although this course may serve as partial preparation for the Economic Sociology and Organizations preliminary examination, no guarantee of comprehensiveness is assumed. Coverage of topics is not at the level of depth necessary for the exam. Moreover, because economic sociology is such a broad area, certain key topics are absent from the syllabus. Contemporary comparative work is given relatively little attention, as is coverage of historical (as opposed to contemporary) work on globalization. Still, the goal is to cover a broad range of topics to give the student a taste of the vibrancy of the area. The course will be run as a seminar.

Most readings will be in course pack form (through Dollar Bill Copying) and will be available at Michigan Book and Supply at the corner of State and North University. I have ordered three books (available at the Shaman Drum Bookstore, 313 South State Street) as well, the purchase of which is strongly recommended: Granovetter, Mark and Richard Swedberg (eds.), The Sociology of Economic Life Granovetter, Mark, Getting A Job (2 nd edition) Smelser, Neil and Richard Swedberg (eds.), The Handbook of Economic Sociology

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 528. Selected Topics in the Analysis of Chinese Society.

Section 001 Sociology and China

Instructor(s): Ching Kwan Lee

Prerequisites: Soc. 428. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 533. Practicum in Comparative Historical Sociology II.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Howard A Kimeldorf

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 535. The Urban Community.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey D Morenoff (morenoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Undergraduates with permission of instructor.No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Soc. 535. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/soc/535/001.nsf

This seminar is designed to provide an examination of the major dimensions along which urban communities are socially organized and stratified. We will begin by revisiting classic urban sociology, primarily the "Chicago-School," and also explore its more contemporary manifestations and revisions. Other topics include social networks and community, political economy and the "new urban sociology," community crime and social disorganization theory, the history and etiology of the urban ?underclass,? community social organization and the black middle class, the neighborhood as a site of collective action and identity, spatial forms of racial/ethnic inequality, theories of social capital and collective efficacy, and social (dis)order in public spaces. Both ethnographic and quantitative research approaches will be considered as they bear on community-level social organization.

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SOC 544. Sociology of Family and Kinship.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sandra Hofferth

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 547. Gender and Sexuality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karin A Martin (kamartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 560. Power, History, and Social Change.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 591. Special Areas of Social Psychology.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Andre Modigliani (modigli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Soc 590. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 595. Special Courses.

Section 001 AGENCY.

Instructor(s): Julia Potter Adams (jpadams@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 595. Special Courses.

Section 002 NARRATIVES AND NUMBERS: INTEGRATING QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN THE STUDY OF GENDER AND THE LIFE COURSE. Meets with Women's Studies 602.001 AND Rackham 570.002

Instructor(s): David L Featherman, Abigail J Stewart,

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~irwg/narratives.html

No Description Provided

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SOC 595. Special Courses.

Section 003 Sociology of Law Seminar.

Instructor(s): Richard O Lempert

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 595. Special Courses.

Section 004 COLONIALISM, POSTCOLONIALISM, AND GERMAN STUDIES. MEETS WITH GERMAN 821.001.

Instructor(s): George P Steinmetz (geostein@umich.edu), Julia C Hell

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See German 821.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 597. Special Courses.

Section 001 THE URBAN ETHNOGRAPHIC TRADITION. Meets with CAAS 558.002.

Instructor(s): Alford A Young Jr (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See CAAS 558.002.

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SOC 597. Special Courses.

Section 002 SURVEY MANAGEMENT.

Instructor(s): Nancy A Mathiowetz

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 610. Statistical Methods.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark S Mizruchi (mizruchi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Soc. 510 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (4).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mizruchi/soc610.pdf

This course is the second portion of the two-semester sequence (Sociology 510, 610) required of all sociology department graduate students. It consists of two weekly class sessions plus a lab-discussion. This term focuses on multivariate techniques, especially multiple linear regression. The lab sessions will be used to discuss problems encountered in the lectures and written assignments and to refine students' statistical computing skills. The course assumes knowledge of the material covered in Sociology 510. It assumes no mathematical knowledge beyond high school algebra, but students will have an opportunity to develop elementary skills in more advanced mathematical techniques.

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SOC 610. Statistical Methods.

Section 002.

Prerequisites: Soc. 510 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (4).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 610. Statistical Methods.

Section 003.

Prerequisites: Soc. 510 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (4).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 612/Psych. 687. Methods of Survey Sampling.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two graduate-level courses in statistical methods. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/soc/612/001.nsf

Methods of Survey Sampling/Applied Sampling is an applied statistical methods course, but differs from most statistics courses. It is concerned almost exclusively with the design of data collection. Little of the analysis of collected data will be discussed in the course. The course will concentrate on problems of applying sampling methods to human populations, since survey practices are more widely used in that area, and since sampling human populations poses a number particular problems not found in sampling of other types of units. The principles of sample selection, though, can be applied to many other types of populations.

The course is presented at a moderately advanced statistical level. While we will not develop the mathematical aspects of sampling theory, statistical notation and outlines of some algebraic proofs will be given. A sound background in applied statistics is necessary, since a few algebraic derivations will be presented. Little emphasis will be placed on the derivations. Nonetheless, a thorough understanding of the notation and results will be needed.

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SOC 630. Research Methods in Population and Human Ecology.

Section 001 RESEARCH METHODS IN POPULATION AND HUMAN ECOLOGY.

Instructor(s): Barbara A Anderson

Prerequisites: Soc. 530. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 695. Directed Research.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 696. Directed Reading.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 717/Stat. 580/Biostat. 617 (Public Health). Methods and Theory of Sample Design.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Three or more courses in statistics and preferably a course in methods of survey sampling. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/biostat/617/001.nsf

See Statistics 580.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 785/Psych. 785. Group Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eugene Burnstein

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 785.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 825/Hist. 825/Anthro. 825/Chinese 825/Econ. 825/Pol. Sci. 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 830. Research Seminar in Social Demography.

Section 001 Social Demography Training Seminar.

Instructor(s): Yu Xie (yuxie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Population Background. Graduate standing. (1-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/~yuxie/soc830.html

Sociology 830 (Social Demography Training Seminar) is offered every semester. Students in the Social Demography Program are expected to attend it continuously when in residence for 1-3 credits per semester. Its objectives are to socialize students to be professional researchers and help students write research papers. It consists of the PSC Brownbag Seminar, the Student Research Forum, and group and individualized meetings with the instructor. Although students are enrolled for only 1 or 2 credits most of the time, they are required to register for full (3) credits at least once, in the term they complete and present a research paper. It is expected that students who use Sociology 830 to fulfill their research seminar requirement in the Department of Sociology be enrolled in Sociology 830 for at least two semesters.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

SOC 850/Psych. 890/Epid. 850 (Public Health). Psychosocial Factors in Mental Health I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David R Williams

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May be elected more than once.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 988/Psych. 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 002 Laboratory in cultural psychology. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Richard E Nisbett (nisbett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 988.001.

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SOC 988/Psych. 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 003 STRUCTURAL & HIERARCHICAL MODELING IN THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES. (3 credits). Meets with Communication Studies 810.001.

Instructor(s): L Rowell Huesmann (huesmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/comm/810/001.nsf

See Communication Studies 810.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

SOC 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Mark Chesler (mchesler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Winter Academic Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

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SOC 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


Undergraduate Course Listings for SOC.


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