College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Spanish


This page was created at 7:58 AM on Tue, Jan 30, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 – April 26)

Open courses in Spanish
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for SPANISH

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Spanish.


SPANISH 410/Rom. Ling. 410. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276. Spanish 405 is strongly recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will offer participants a theoretical foundation in Spanish phonetics and phonology. It includes the study of articulatory phonetics, phological theory, distinctive feature analysis, practice in transcription, lab practice, contrastive analysis of English and Spanish sounds, with special attention to those sounds of Spanish that are most difficult for English speakers to acquire. The grade will be based on a midterm and a final exam, four quizzes, various homework assignments and a final paper. Course is conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 432. Gender, Writing, and Culture.

Literature

Section 001 – Spanish Women Narrative of the Post-Franco Era (1975-present)

Instructor(s): Astrid A Billat (abillat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). For Grad credit, must do regular course work assigned, as well as 20 page research paper.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

With the death of Dictator Francisco Franco in 1975, Spain underwent numerous political and sociocultural changes. Among those changes is the greater freedom for women, a phenomenon which is addressed in many ways in the literary production of the end of 1970's, the 80's and 90's. In this course we will explore such narrative.

We will read works by the following authors: Almudena Grandes, Cristina Fernández Cubas, Mercedes Abad, Concha Alós, Josefina Aldecoa, Carmen Riera, Clara Janés, Soledad Puértolas, Ana María Moix, Laura Freixas y Pilar Pedraza. (this list might be modified).

This course will offer the student the opportunity to acquire the necessary tools in order to analyze a narrative. Moreover, through readings, written assignments and daily class discussions, the student will be able to strengthen his/her reading, writing and speaking skills in Spanish.

The student will be evaluated on the following work:

Daily participation 15%
Midterm exam 25%
Final exam 25%
In class/homeworks/short papers (1-2 pages) 15%
Final paper 20%

The course, as well as all exams and papers, will be entirely in Spanish (reading, writing and speaking).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 435. Independent Study.

Literature

Prerequisites: Permission of department. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Interested students should contact the concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

SPANISH 437. Introduction to Literature Studies and Criticism.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Santiago Colás (scolas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What do literary critics do? What have they done? What can they do? How is studying literature (being part of Literary Studies) different, or not, than reading literature? What's the relationship between a practice called "criticism" and a feeling called "pleasure"? How about between that practice and unpleasure? How can writing communicate the experience of reading? What's the connection between criticism and creativity? Who cares about literary criticism anyway? And why should they? In this course, we will explore these questions via a series of readings of fiction, literary criticism, and literary theory. Students should emerge from the course with: (1) an elementary understanding of the variety of practices that may constitute literary criticism as a practice; (2) an introductory glimpse into the various institutional forces that help determine what gets called literary criticism; (3) exposure to the assumptions, habits, feelings, and values of critical thinking. A great deal of writing will be required in the course, particularly in the form of regular short essays. The course will be conducted in English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 448. Hispanic Culture Through Community Service Learning.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christina Jose-Kampfner

Prerequisites: Any 300-level Spanish course. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SPANISH 456. Golden Age.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique García Santo-Tomás (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

El presente curso estudiará una serie de textos canónicos desde una perspectiva contemporánea, enfatizando su contextualización socio-política, histórica y literaria, además de nuevos acercamientos que se adapten a la sensibilidad moderna. Se analizará poesía, teatro y narrativa, en un diseño cronológico que prestará atención cuestiones como el "yo" poético en su transición del Renacimiento al Barroco, la creación de una dramaturgia nacional de sabor autóctono, y la inauguración de nuevos modos narrativos como la picaresca o la novela corta. Los autores a estudiar serán Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Jesús, San Juan de la Cruz, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Góngora, Tirso de Molina, Quevedo y Calderón de la Barca. La clase será en español.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 464. Spanish Romanticism.

Literature

Section 001 – Representations of Woman in Spanish Romanticism

Instructor(s): Manuel Camarero

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course offers a reflection on representations of woman in Spanish Romanticism by examining representative works of Spanish Romantic literature.

Students will follow discussions in class on a variety of topics:

Towards a typology of representations of woman: types and archetypes.
The misogynist representation (Mesonero Romanos, Larra).
The erotic representation: sexuality, sexism, and voyeurism (Espronceda, Estébanez Calderón).
The idealization of woman (Gil y Carrasco, Zorrilla).
The sensible/sensitive woman (Gómez de Avellaneda, Coronado).
Man-made/woman-made representations (Fernán Caballero).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 470. Latin-American Literature, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries.

Literature

Section 001 – Colonial satire

Instructor(s): Maria Soledad Barbon (mbarbon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Almost right from the beginning of the conquest of the New World we encounter politically and societally critical forms of literary expression in the form of satires, the earliest being verses scribbled on the walls of the palaces of the conquistadores Cortés and Pizarro.

This course aims at giving an overview of such writings in the Viceroyalty of Peru from the sixteenth up to the end of the eighteenth century by concentrating on three major satirists as well as introducing students to the theory of satire. Starting with the more playful satire of the Spaniard Mateo Rosas de Oquendo (Sátira hecha por Mateo Rosas de Oquendo a las cosas que pasan en el Pirú año de 1598 ) we will move to the biting satirical poetry of authors such as Juan del Valle y Caviedes (1651-97) and Esteban Terralla y Landa (Lima por dentro y por fuera, 1797).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 475. Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century.

Literature

Section 001 – The Latin-American Best-Seller.

Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Are best-sellers "bad literature"? Should the academy examine and study best-sellers? Why so many Latin American novels have become best-sellers in the last 30 years? Do best-sellers belong in the academic curriculum? To answer these questions, this course examines the "old" and "new" publishing trends in Latin American literature through a genealogy of the Latin American best-seller novel. In our readings, we will study the international success and recognition of the works of Gabriel García Márquez and Manuel Puig in the 1960s and 1970s as well as the more recently "acclaimed" works of Isabel Allende, Laura Esquivel, Zoé Valdés, Jaime Bayly and Eliseo Alberto.

Tentative Reading List:
García Márquez, Gabriel. Cien años de soledad (1967)
Puig, Manuel. El beso de la mujer araña (1976)
Allende, Isabel. La casa de los espíritus (1982)
Esquivel, Laura. Como agua para chocolate (1989)
Alberto, Eliseo. Caracol Beach (1998)

Course Requirements: Classwork (20%), Presentations and Oral Reports (20%), 5 Papers (60%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 475. Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century.

Literature

Section 002 – Cuban Personal and National Performance

Instructor(s): Lucía M Suárez (suarez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will engage in an intensive analysis of the historical events, intersecting ideological narratives, cinematic presentations, political evolution, and personal experiences that create a contemporary Cuban and Cuban-American identity.

Particular attention will be paid to the "politics of writing." What narratives shape our visions of Cuban society, history and mythology? What role do writers play in that narrative construction? How has the autobiographical and confessional become a central mode of communication in Cuban literature and film?

We will read two texts from the nineteenth century in order to better understand the trajectory of the nation between Spanish colony and revolutionary state. This class is conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literature

Section 001 – Experiments in 20C Theater.

Instructor(s): Andrew A Anderson (andander@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will be concerned with the different ways in which several twentieth-century Spanish playwrights sought to change, reform, subvert or destroy the realistic/naturalistic norm that they had inherited. We shall read plays by Valle-Inclán, García Lorca, Alberti and Buero Vallejo, among others, and in each instance we shall be considering the ways in which the texts depart from the norm, particularly as regards the difficulties of staging them in a theater and the innovations in production values and techniques that the plays thereby require of the director and stage designer. There will be several in-class projects and three written papers. All readings and class discussion in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literature

Section 002 – HISPANIOLA: ONE ISLAND, TWO NATIONS

Instructor(s): Lucía M Suárez (suarez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class we will examine the production of Dominican literature in relationship to Dominican-American (Latina/o) writing; and Haitian literature with respect to the literary production of the Haitian diaspora. We will investigate how the Trujillo and Duvalier dictatorships shaped discourses of nationality, ethnicity and race, and how these, in turn, stimulated a consequent literary reaction.

Fictional texts such as Julia Álvarez's In the Time of the Butterflies and Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones, have brought international attention to the poverty stricken region of Hispaniola. Mario Vargas Llosa's recent novel, La fiesta del chivo situates the Trujillo dictatorship among the chain of Latin American dictators of the twentieth century. In contrast Stephen Alexis' work points to the beginnings of Haitian nationalism as an exemplary model of independence gone awry. This region of intense violence and trauma is sculpted not by the silence and fear that it often witnesses, but rather, by courageous writers in exile. We will explore the meaning of writing fiction and its use as a tool of testimony.

This class is reading intensive. It will be conducted in Spanish. If any students read in French, recommendations for work not in translation will be made.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literature

Section 001 – Popular literary consciousness in narrative and drama.

Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will study three Latin American novels written between 1900 and 1950. These novels (Jorge Icaza's Huasipungo, Ciro Alegría's El mundo es ancho y ajeno, and Nicomedes Guzman's La sangre y la esperanza), as well as important theatrical pieces such as Rodolfo Usigli's El gesticulador, appear in a historical period when Latin America moves from the expansion of export-import growth (1900-1930) into the import-substituting industrialization (1930-1950s). By shifting from the literary into the socio-historical development of Latin America throughout the first half of the twentieth century, this course will focus on how literature registers in novels and in theater the creation of multiclass "populist" alliances. The course will also relate narrative and drama with some key essays of the period, such as José Vasconcelos' Raza cósmica and José Carlos Mariátegui's Siete ensayos de interpretación de la realidad peruana.

Students taking this course should be motivated to study literature from economic and sociopolitical points of view. Students are expected to participate very actively in class discussions. Students will take a midterm exam and will have a final take-home.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literature

Section 002 – Crónicas andinas

Instructor(s): Maria Soledad Barbon (mbarbon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to explore different Andean voices on the Spanish conquest and the Inca past. We will start by examining the Ynstrucción del Ynga don Diego de Castro Titu Cusi Yupangui para el muy ilustre señor el Licencidao Lope García de Castro (1570) by Titu Cusi Yupanqui, a testimony of the Spanish conquest which was first dictated in Quechua and then translated into Spanish by an Augustinian friar.

We will then turn to the works of two major Andean chroniclers: the description of colonial life in the Viceroyalty of Peru in the illustrated Nueva corónica y buen gobierno (1615) by Guaman Poma de Ayala and the Comentarios Reales de los Incas (1609) by the Inca Garcilaso de la Vega whose purpose was to recover the history and culture of the Incas.

We will focus on the argumentative structure of these texts, the historical and historiographical context in which they were produced and the polemics in which they engage.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 635. Independent Study.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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SPANISH 666. Studies in Lyric Poetry of the Golden Age.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique García Santo-Tomás (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

El presente seminario recorre algo más de cien años de imaginación poética desde el verso fundacional de Boscán y Garcilaso hasta lente distorsionada de Quevedo, pasando por la experiencia personal de Fray Luis, Santa Teresa y San Juan, los tintes amorosos y nacionalistas de Herrera, la inequívoca creación cervantina y la personal impronta de Villamediana, hasta llegar al momento gongorino que no olvida el paradigma de un Lope de Vega que recorre varias décadas y estilos en lo humano y lo divino. Sin marginar a las voces de la otra ladera atlántica, las lecturas volverán a algunos de los temas universales y también a creaciones particulares: desamor, sexo, religión, ascensos y descensos, prostitutas, ovejas y gatos por doquier, reyes vivos y muertos, bofetadas, secretos, desfiles, malos poetas, deformidades, paisaje urbano… como parte de un amplio crisol de gustos y tendencias que cubren el cosmos aurisecular. La clase será en español.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 676. Advanced Studies in 20th Century Spanish Thought.

Section 001 – Literary Commerce: The Modern Spanish Novel

Instructor(s): Juli A Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will address commerce in the broadest sense, as the exchange of products, signs, and ideas. We will focus on two booming commercial moments in Spain, the 1880's and the 1920's – both times of rapid economic and technological change – and examine texts that take up economic as well as sexual commerce as major themes. At the same time, we will consider the novel from a Bakhtinian perspective as a promiscuous genre that appropriates and mixes languages drawn from different domains. From a broader theoretical perspective we will consider the exchanges within and across the economic and linguistic orders, as we ask to what extent do these domains, both complex, symbolic systems, operate on similar principles. And from still another perspective, that of Bourdieu, we will also consider the novel as part of "the business of art," as a commodity produced and exchanged in a field of cultural production.

We will address these questions through close readings and discussions of the following narrative texts:

Fortunata y Jacinta by Benito Pérez Galdós (Porrúa edition);
Novísimas greguerías by Ramón Gómez de la Serna (fotocopied);
Doña Inés by Azorín (Castalia edition;
Cazador en el alba by Francisco Ayala (Alianza edition);
and Locura y muerte de nadie by Benjamín Jarnés (photocopied). (Please purchase or obtain these editions to better facilitate close readings in class).

In addition, through selected readings (in a course pack), we will explore diverse theoretical perspectives on these questions: Martin on origins of the novel, Bakhtin on dialogism, Barthes on narrative codes, Benjamin on commodity fetishism, Saussure on linguistic exchange, Goux on symbolic systems, Smith on contingencies of value, Deleuze and Guatarri on rhizomes and "nuptials," Bourdieu on symbolic capital. Recommended is a "toolbox" for narrative analysis, Shlomith Rimmon-Kenin's manual, Narrative Fiction.

The course is designed primarily for first and second-year students in graduate studies; for while examining current questions and approaches in the field, it serves as an introduction to modern Spanish narrative, to narrative theory and analysis. Two essays are required (each 8 – 10 pages): one, focusing on a single novel, is a "practice paper" for an academic conference; the other is a more creative exercise, or "think-piece," that explores questions addressed in the course across three or more narrative and/or theoretical texts. Also assigned are reaction papers (1 – 2 pages, every two weeks), a class presentation, and "teaching of a text" by leading a class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 855. Special Topics Seminar.

Section 001 – TESTIMONIO Y RECIENTES MOVIMIENTOS CULTURALES EN LOS ANDES

Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

El seminario estudiará críticamente el trayecto del discurso testimonial, desde el momento eufórico de su presencia rebelde en la crítica literaria como "discurso tercermundista". hasta su reflexión, temperada con el tiempo, como contradiscurso institucionalizado por el saber académico.

El propósito central del curso no es reforzar la legitimación de este controversial género literario, sino problematizar las implicaciones de su institucionalización. Estas implicaciones tienen que ver con otras batallas institucionales igualmente importantes: la oposición entre postmodernidad y postcolonialidad; los debates en torno al tema de la representación; la discusión en torno a los estudios subalternos; las propuestas sobre temas de raza, género y clase social.

Al seguir el desarrollo progresivo del testimonio en la crítica literaria de las últimas décadas, el seminario dividirá su trabajo en tres partes: la primera parte leerá los más importantes estudios de aquellos intelectuales "progresistas" en la academia norteamericana que teorizan el testimonio como género literario. Definido como "huella de lo real". el testimonio es en esta primera etapa conceptualizado como acto de solidaridad con los movimientos revolucionarios latinoamericanos que tienen lugar después de la Revolución cubana.

La segunda parte estudiará la crítica del momento eufórico de la recepción del testimonio. Recelosa del "izquierdismo" asumido por la crítica en su primera etapa de análisis del testimonio, la segunda generación de críticos explora la ruptura entre el sujeto del testimonio y el sujeto de su enunciación crítica. Este desplazamiento crítico remata en una duda fundamental: ¿produce el testimonio solidaridad o mímica de la solidaridad? Si es lo segundo, el testimonio termina en su "fetichización estética" y en su reincorporación nada rebelde dentro del canon de la literatura.

La tercera parte del seminario va más allá del testimonio.Al ubicar ejemplos de la situación andina más reciente, el seminario estudiará aquellas situaciones críticas (migraciones del campo a la ciudad, crisis de los enclaves proletarios, etc.) que determinan la crisis de la esfera pública proletaria y de su representación visual y letrada. En este sentido, incluso importantes testimonios orales y fílmicos dejan de ser ya la representación adecuada (en el sentido de "hablar por" o "hablar sobre". de la subalternidad en relación a la dominación. ¿No se han tornado las representaciones artísticas de la vanguardia proletaria (muralismo, cine-testimonio) en formas esteticas perdidas y nostálgicas? Lo que está en tela de juicio es el concepto mismo de la agencia estética. ¿Cómo reconceptualizar este concepto en un mundo que introduce hoy en día nuevas formas de democratización cultural? ¿Qué rol juega en todo esto el colapso de la distinción entre cultura de élites y cultura de masas? Éstas y otras preguntas similares guiarán la discusión de las últimas semanas del seminario.

Los estudiantes deberan participar activamente en el seminario. Los temas serán distribuidos cada día, de modo tal que siempre habrán dos estudiantes encargados de presentar las lecturas diarias. Los estudiantes están obligados a entregar un ensayo final que aplique las lecturas a las diferentes sociedades andinas. La selección de temas para los ensayos deberá hacerse durante las tres primeras semanas del seminario.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 895. Independent Study.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


SPANISH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

SPANISH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


Undergraduate Course Listings for SPANISH.


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