College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Biology


This page was created at 6:00 PM on Tue, Oct 30, 2001.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 April 26)

Open courses in Biology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for BIOLOGY

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Biology.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Biology this week go to What's New This Week.

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BIOLOGY 400. Advanced Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: 12 credits of biology, 3.0 average in science, and permission of faculty member in biology. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for those engaged in original research at an advanced level. This course number is most frequently elected by senior Honors students who have completed Biology 300 and who are completing their research and writing their thesis. A final paper is required. (Refer to the description of Biology 300 for more information.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

BIOLOGY 401. Advanced Topics in Biology.

Section 001 Special Topics in Ecology and Evolution.

Instructor(s): William Fink (wfink@umich.edu), Deborah Goldberg (degold@umich.edu), Mark Wilson (wilsonml@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Intended for senior concentrators. The prerequisites will be set by the instructor as appropriate for each section. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course addresses topics at the interface of ecology and evolution, incorporating time scales from short-term population dynamics to epochs extending deep in the history of life. Specific topics include incorporating phylogenetic information into comparative ecology, using ecologically-important traits in reconstructing phylogenies, and patterns and mechanisms of genotype by environment interactions. The course meets once per week for background lectures and discussions of readings in the primary literature. In addition, there will be periodic visits by experts in the field to give lectures and hold discussions with the students and a weekend-long symposium involving lectures by several distinguished scholars in the field, a panel discussion and meetings between students and the invited scholars. Requirements include full participation in all activities, periodic essays, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 412. Teaching Biochemistry by the Keller Plan.

Section 001 FIRST MEETING THURS. JAN. 10, 1:00 P.M.

Instructor(s): Marcy P Osgood (mosgood@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Biol. 311 and permission of instructor. (3). This is a graded course. May not be included in any of the Biological Sciences concentration programs. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio311/proctor.shtml

Undergraduates who previously have taken an introductory biochemistry course act as TAs for Introductory Biochemistry (Biology 311). TAs meet with the instructor for a two-hour class each week for lectures, presentations, and discussions of teaching and biochemistry. TAs also prepare a report on a recent advance in biochemistry which they present to their peers and the instructor. The major roles of the TAs are to examine the students on their mastery of unit material and to help the students with explanations supplementary to the textbook. At the completion of an instructor-generated written quiz, the student and TA grade the quiz together. TAs learn considerable biochemistry by repeated teachings of unit materials and, in addition, profit from their experience as teachers and evaluators.

Text: Lehninger's Principles of Biochemistry 3rd Edition, Nelson and Cox.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

BIOLOGY 413. Plant Molecular Biology Laboratory.

Instructor(s): Eran Pichersky

Prerequisites: Biol. 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415; and Biol. 305. (3). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a project lab in which students learn to identify and analyze plant genes and gene products using the latest techniques of molecular biology. Emphasis will be on genes encoding unique plant characteristics. Students will first isolate genes from DNA libraries of various plant species. They will then analyze the sequence of genes they have isolated by DNA sequencing, and will characterize their copy number and expression levels by various techniques such as Southern blots, Northern blots, etc. The genes will then be manipulated to produce the gene products (i.e., proteins) in a bacterial system.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 419. Endocrinology Laboratory.

Instructor(s): Sushama Denver (spavgi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Biol. 418. (3). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio419/

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with methods used in endocrinological investigations. The students will learn techniques ranging from the organismal to the molecular level. The course emphasizes hypothesis testing, modern techniques, and data analysis. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIO 418 is required to take this course. The enrollment is limited to 12 students. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. The laboratory will meet twice a week (a four-hour session and a two-hour session), however, students should anticipate an additional two or three hours laboratory time at various (and occasionally odd) times in the week. Course assignments include a term paper, quizzes, and other short assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 426. Molecular Endocrinology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cunming Duan (cduan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Biol. 310, 311, or Biol. Chem. 415; and Biol. 225 or 418. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio426/intro.html

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview on the latest advances in our understanding of how hormones work at the molecular and cellular level in vertebrate animal systems, including humans. This course is intended for advanced undergraduate students, pre-medical students, and beginning graduate students. The course will begin with an overview of the vertebrate endocrine systems. We will then examine several topics, including growth factor biology, hormone receptors, intracellular signal transduction pathways, and hormonally regulated gene expression. A portion of this course will be devoted to discussing specific topics (i.e., hormones and cancer, environmental endocrine disrupters, etc.) and reading relevant research publications. Students are expected to have a basic familiarity with biochemistry and/or animal physiology. Courses in endocrinology and cell and molecular biology are helpful but not required. Grades will be based on three examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3 Contact Prof. Duan about wait list information.

BIOLOGY 427. Molecular Biology.

Section 001 MIDTERM EXAMS WILL BE HELD MONDAY EVENINGS, FEB. 4, MAR. 18, AND APR. 15, 6-8 P.M.

Instructor(s): Ruthann Nichols

Prerequisites: Biol. 305; and Biol. 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Comprehensive coverage of the general principles governing the structures, synthesis, and functions of DNA, RNA, and proteins in the context of the cell. Emphasizes understanding methods and interpretation of data. Topics include genome organization, DNA replication and transposition, chromosome segregation, transcription and translation, the processing of macromolecules, signal transfer, and regulation at various levels. Two lectures per week are supplemented by a 1.5 hour discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 428. Cell Biology.

Section 001 MIDTERM EXAMS WILL BE HELD TUES, FEB 5, AND TUES, MAR 19, 6-8 PM.

Instructor(s): James Bardwell (jbardwel@umich.edu) , Kenneth M Cadigan (cadigan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Biol. 305; and Biol. 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. Students with credit for Biol. 320 must obtain permission of instructor. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio428/

Biology 428 is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of the biology of eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the cellular and molecular level. This course is intended for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students. The information is presented at a level that requires students to integrate information from their other biology, chemistry, and biochemistry courses. Topics include: cell structure and function; cell membranes; intracellular organelles and cytoskeleton; inter- and intra-cellular signaling; cell development and cell cycle. Students will be expected to integrate the scientific data presented in class as well as to read and interpret basic research drawn from the current scientific literature. Grades will be based on four exams and the discussion section.

Contact jbardwel@umich.edu or cadigan@umich.edu if you have questions regarding the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 429. Laboratory in Cell and Molecular Biology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Biol. 427 or 428, or concurrent enrollment in Biol. 428. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biol. Chem. 416 or 516. (3). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course consists of one lecture and two four hour laboratory sessions each week. Additional time outside of scheduled laboratory sessions will be required. The lectures provide the background for techniques used in the laboratory and assume a fundamental knowledge of cell and molecular biology. The laboratory sessions introduce microscopy, biochemical approaches, and nucleic acid and protein techniques. Grades are based on two exams, laboratory practical quizzes, and a group grant proposal. The course can be used to satisfy requirements in the Cell and Molecular Biology Concentration and Microbiology Concentration. It is also appropriate for the Biology Concentration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 430. Molecular Biology of Plants.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John W Schiefelbein (schiefel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Biol. 305; and 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The topic of this course is major advances in understanding molecular processes in plants, and the contribution of molecular biological techniques to these advances. The course is intended for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students. The course will begin with an overview of the basic techniques of molecular biology such as cloning and sequencing of DNA, transformation, and analysis of gene expression. We will then examine selected topics in detail, including genome structure, biochemical pathways, photoreception, photosynthesis, signaling, and development. We will read and then discuss research publications in class. Student performance will be evaluated on the basis of class presentations and participation, and two examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 450. Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald A Nussbaum (nuss@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Biol. 162. (5). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio450/

Lectures on the evolution, behavior, ecology, and life history of amphibians and reptiles. Laboratory exercises and field trips emphasize identification, life history, adaptations, and field methods.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 472. Plant-Animal Interactions.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beverly J Rathcke (brathcke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Biol. 281. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will examine the ecology and evolution of the interactions between plants and animals and fungi including herbivory, pollination, dispersal, and resource mutualisms. Current theory, hypothesis testing, and empirical approaches will be examined in depth. The format will include two 1.5 hour lectures with interactive discussions per week. Readings will be from the current literature. No textbook is required. Assignments will include short papers or essays, a term paper with peer review, and an oral presentation. This course is intended for upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 476 / NRE 476. Ecosystem Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): George W Kling II (gwk@umich.edu), Donald R Zak

Prerequisites: An ecology course in the department of Biology, or an ecology course approved by the instructor; and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~gwk/teaching/ecosystems/476home.html

Ecosystem Ecology focuses on current theories regarding the control and function of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, the approaches and techniques being used to test these theories, and the application of theory to the management and restoration of ecosystems. The scope includes examples from terrestrial, marine, and freshwater ecosystems. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: General Ecology and an upper-level course in Aquatic or Terrestrial Ecology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 483. Limnology: Freshwater Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John T Lehman (jtlehman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or graduate standing, with background in physics, chemistry, biology, or water-related sciences. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Lakes and lake processes will be discussed from the perspective of identifying environmental problems and using scientific knowledge to solve the problems. We will use a series of case studies that include Lake Michigan and other Great Lakes as well as other lakes in North America, Europe, and Africa. The academic emphasis of the course will be on understanding and integrating the causes and effects of physical, geological, chemical, and biological aspects of lake environments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 484. Limnology Laboratory.

Instructor(s): John T Lehman (jtlehman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Biol. 483. (3). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Field and laboratory techniques in aquatic science. Several field trips to local lakes during both ice cover and open water conditions will enable students to master sampling and measurement techniques for acquiring physical, chemical, and biological data. Laboratory work will include chemical analysis of lake water, taxonomy and counting methods for aquatic biota, use of automated data acquisition technology, and experimental methods applicable to lake plankton communities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 487 / NRE 409. Ecology of Fishes.

Section 001 (4 credits). Meets with Biology 487.003.

Instructor(s): Edward S Rutherford

Prerequisites: One course in ecology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ecology is the study of interactions which determine the distribution and abundance of organisms. For fishes, these interactions can roughly be categorized into physiological, behavioral, and population-community interactions. Ecology of fishes is organized to examine all of these interactions.

Although fishes are emphasized, other aquatic organisms are also included. Also, aquatic ecosystems of interest include not only local freshwater systems, but also tropical and marine ones. The course gives special emphasis on bioenergetics of fish, and how energy flow is viewed on an individual, population, and community level of organization.

The course consists of three hours of lecture per week (for three credits). There is also an optional lab (three hours per week) for one more credit. The lab emphasizes field ecology of fishes, as well as laboratory analyses of energetics and behavior. Evaluation of students is based on two midterm exams and a final exam, which emphasize essay questions involving synthesis. The lab is evaluated on a lab notebook and an exam. Reading materials include a textbook (estimated cost $45) and a small course pack (estimated cost $10).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 487 / NRE 409. Ecology of Fishes.

Section 003 (3 credits). Meets with Biology 487.001.

Instructor(s): Edward S Rutherford

Prerequisites: One course in ecology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Biology 487.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 488. Microbial Ecology of Terrestrial Ecosystems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert D Fogel (rfogel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Biol. 162. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.herb.lsa.umich.edu/teaching/Bio488/488_indx.htm

Biotechnology has brought new recognition to these fascinating and unique organisms. This lecture course surveys the members of the soil biota (bacteria, fungi, insects, and other invertebrates), provides an introduction to their ecology, structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems, and importance to man in biotechnology, maintaining and restoring ecosystem productivity, and plant pathology. This course provides useful training for students interested in careers in biotechnology, plant pathology, forest pathology, soil biology, and microbial ecology. Grades are based on three hourly exams and a group project.

Textbook: Paul, E.A. and F.E. Clark, 1996. Soil Microbiology and Biochemistry. Academic Press. ISBN 0-12-546806-7

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 490. Population and Quantitative Genetics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jianzhi Zhang (jzhang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Biol. 305. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to introduce population genetics as it relates to all branches of modern biology. Emphasis will be placed on basic concepts and methods. We will systematically examine the effects of mutation, migration, selection, and random drift on genetic variations within and between populations and will introduce key methods of molecular population genetics and evolution. Real data, mostly from recent literature, will be discussed to illustrate the power of population genetics in addressing questions related to human origins, development, ecology, diseases, etc. Students will also have ample opportunities to apply the theories to real biological questions and to get familiar with some frequently used software in the field. We anticipate students to develop "population" thinking during the course, which has not been emphasized in most molecular biology courses. Evaluation will be by ~ five assignments and one term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 496 / NRE 425. Population Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Edward Breck

Prerequisites: General ecology and NR&E 438; calculus recommended. (4). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course you will learn the major concepts and models used in understanding the structure and abundance of populations in space and time. Population ecology is a very active area of research, making important contributions to the conservation and management of natural resources. This course is intended to give you an overview of this expanding field and the background to understand future developments. Lecture topics will include exponential population growth, resource-limited population growth, models with age structure or stage structure, individual-based models, metapopulations, spatial models, competition, predation, and patch dynamics. Major themes in the course include life history trade-offs, optimization, consequences of body size, and application of concepts and models to the conservation and management of animal and plant populations.

In order to learn this material you should apply it to solve problems. A structured set of problems will be assigned in the computer labs as homework. We will use spreadsheets (for example, Microsoft Excel) and mathematical software (for example, MathCad) to solve the problems and display the results.

Goals. The goals of this course are to:

  • Become familiar with the major concepts and models in population ecology, and
  • Be able to use these as tools to solve applied problems in the conservation and management of animal and plant populations.

Through the readings and computer labs you will get experience in applying concepts and using analytical methods to help understand the dynamics of populations and help manage animal and plant populations.

Required text: Gotelli, Nicholas J. 1998. A Primer of Ecology. 2nd ed. Sinauer Associates, Inc., Sunderland, Mass. [Available at the Michigan Union Bookstore; might also be at Michigan Book & Supply, and Ulrich's.] A bibliography is available containing references mentioned in lecture and lab, used in their preparation, as well as some key papers.

Prerequisites: This course assumes you have taken an introductory course in general ecology and one year of calculus. Some familiarity with computer spreadsheet software (for example, Microsoft Excel) will be helpful. Mathematical software (MathCad) will be introduced.

Course requirements. You will be expected to:

  • Attend lectures on a regular basis;
  • Complete weekly computer lab assignments;
  • Complete the term project;
  • Take the midterm exam and the final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 497. Community Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Deborah E Goldberg (degold@umich.edu) , Earl E Werner (eewerner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: A course in ecology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An examination of current theory and empirical research on ecological communities. Emphasis is on the analyses of patterns in community structure and species diversity, and the mechanisms responsible for generating and maintaining these patterns. Specific topics include the roles of species interactions such as: competition, predation, and mutualisms; spatial and temporal heterogeneity; landscape structure and biogeography, in community processes. A background in ecology is required. Readings are from the original literature. There are two one and one-half hour lecture/discussions per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: See Profs. Goldberg or Werner about wait list information.

BIOLOGY 541 / PSYCH 532 / PHYSIOL 541 / ANAT 541. Mammalian Reproductive Endocrinology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lee

Prerequisites: Biol. 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Physiology 541.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for BIOLOGY.


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