College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in CAAS


This page was created at 11:03 AM on Wed, Mar 20, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in CAAS
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for CAAS

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for CAAS.


CAAS 405 / ANTHRCUL 400. Field Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin Holl

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (8).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 400.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 406 / ANTHRCUL 401. Archaeology Laboratory Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin Holl

Prerequisites: Junior standing; concurrent enrollment in Anthro. 400. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 401.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Cross-Area Courses). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, a permission number will be issued.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CAAS 418 / POLSCI 419. Black Americans and the Political System.

African-American Studies

Section 001 Black Am & Political System.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Political Science 419.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 427 / ANTHRCUL 427 / WOMENSTD 427. African Women.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elisha P Renne (erenne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One course in African Studies, anthropology, or women's studies. CAAS 200 recommended. (3). (African Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course considers differences in African women's experiences (raising the question of whether the term African women is a meaningful category) as well as the experiences that women living in the various sub-Saharan African countries share. We will begin with the theoretical question of African women's power and their role in the domestic sphere, focussing on marriage (as institution, as ritual, as strategy, as site of reproduction) for women in Kenya, Liberia, Niger, and Nigeria. Since marriage was affected by colonial policies, changes in marriage practices as well as other aspects of women's lives will be discussed. Some of these changes provided opportunities while others restricted women's options. Cote d'Ivoire, Nigeria, and South Africa, Zaire, and Zimbabwe responded to these new situations in various ways. Specific African women's interpretations of these present-day events will be examined through readings of selected autobiographies and novels. The course based on readings from books, journals, newspapers, and African films  will be evaluated through one short paper, class participation, and midterm and final exams (with the option of a research paper).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 433 / FRENCH 402. Francophone Literature in Translation.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 African Drama.

Instructor(s): Mbala Nkanga (mbalank@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: A literature course or any course dealing with the Black experience in Africa or the Americas. (3). (Cross-Area Courses).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See French 402.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 451. Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald C Woods (rcwoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: CAAS 201 and 450 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the second half of a two-course sequence on the constitutional and legal history of African Americans. It covers the phase of this history beginning with the advent of the Modern Civil Rights Movement and extending to the present. In this course, we will approach law as an institution which is constantly shaping and being shaped by the cultural, economic, political, and social environments around it. In looking at the interaction between law, race, and historical process in the latter half of the twentieth century, the course will explore the reciprocal relationship between law and the societal order, the role of law in the philosophical and social discourse of African Americans, and the function of law in the developmental strategies adopted by them. This course will routinely examine the constitutional and legal experience of African Americans as a case study in how ideas are transformed by historical forces in malleable principles of law.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 452. Education of the Black Child.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Teshome G Wagaw (twagaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course deals with overlooked but crucial questions related to the education of Black children in the United States. The area of primary concern will be public schooling, and the emphasis will be laid on analyzing the social, cultural, political, and economic forces which act to influence the learning experiences of Black children. This course will thus consider, on the one hand, the theoretical framing of ideas about the growth, development, and learning of children in different life settings and styles, and, on the other, the existing structural, sociopolitical attempts to find ways and means of relating the philosophy and objectives of public education to the needs of Black children. In the process, this course examines the defects of present-day educational theories which are based on empirical data drawn from studies of less than 1% of the population. The course will test for the applicability and generalizability of such data to other population groups, examine their implications for different cultural systems, and assess what is thus contributed to cognitive variation and performance and competence in the learning process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 454 / ANTHRCUL 453. African-American Culture.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in the social sciences. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 453.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CAAS 457 / ECON 476. Political Economy of Black America.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren C Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 101. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover the economic history of Africans in America from the 15th century to the present, with emphasis placed on the historical roots of contemporary African-American life. Students will leave the class with well-informed opinions on the following topics: the contributions of African Americans to American economic development; the economic foundations and legacies of racial slavery in the United States; the economic significance and meaning of freedom and citizenship; the economic thought of African Americans; the economic structure of Jim Crow and the responses of African Americans to it; the economic causes and consequences of the Black migration to the north; the economics of the Civil Rights Movement; the changing class structure of the Black community; the economics of Black family structure; markets vs. the state in Black economic development; an accounting of contemporary Black economic resources; African Americans in the global economy; and economic strategies for the future.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 Toni Morrison as Novelist and Critic. Meets with English 482.004.

Instructor(s): Arlene Rosemary Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 482.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 19Th CENTURY AFRICAN- AMERICAN HISTORY. Meets with History 468.002.

Instructor(s): Martha Jones (msjonz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 468.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 003 SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY OF UNDERDEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA

Instructor(s): Denis C Ugwuegbu (dcugwueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

When economists discuss the development of Africa, they often forget the psychological component of social and economic development. "The Psychology of Underdevelopment in Africa" is a seminar course that is designed to lead students through lectures, discussions, and demonstrations to explore the psychological causes of the contemporary underdevelopment of the nations of Africa. Emphasis will be placed on the behavioral aspect of development, and will cover topics such as colonial underdevelopment policies in Africa, neo-colonial theories of development, the new nations of Africa and their alternative plan for development, and psychological principles of development.

Special considerations will be given to topics such as attitudes, motivation, and trust and development. Finally, the place of education and human resources planning as important aspects of development efforts will be examined.

Since this course will attract students with various educational backgrounds, students who are ready to make insightful and innovative contributions to the understanding of the causes and possible eradication of development problems of Africa are encouraged to register for it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 004 RALPH ELLISON AND THE BLUES AESTHETIC.

Instructor(s): Paul A Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"I am an invisible man. No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms. I am a man of substance, of flesh and bone, fiber, and liquids and I might even be said to possess a mind. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me. Like the bodiless heads you see sometimes in circus sideshows, it is as though I have been surrounded by mirrors of hard, distorting glass. When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves, or figments of their imagination indeed, everything and anything expect me."

So begins Ralph Ellison's INVISIBLE MAN (1952), certainly one of the most influential and widely discussed African American novels of the twentieth century. This senior seminar will dedicate considerable time to reading Ellison's classic novel and to interpreting it in historical context. We also will survey the non-fiction writings of Ellison (1914-1994), paying particular attention to his theories about African American and American cultural identity as reflected in the languages and rhythms of literary, political, and musical expression (especially the blues and jazz). INVISIBLE MAN, for example, addressed these issues through a strikingly imaginative and controversial depiction of the unnamed main character's "progress" through a series of African American and American political, educational, and cultural institutions and social worlds in the mid-twentieth century. Using Ellison as a partial guide to mid-20th century African American intellectual life, we also will explore the multi-ethnic roots of Ellison's intellectual world, controversies surrounding his writings and ideas, and his impact on later writers. Other authors and critics discussed or read here will include assorted Harlem Renaissance writers, Black leftists, separatists, and liberals, Nation of Islam spokesmen, writers and activists from the 1960s Black Arts movement, and more recent literary artists and postmodernist critics.

Grades will be determined on the basis of attendance, active participation, short reading quizzes or written commentaries, two short papers (4-6 pp. each), an in-class midterm, and a take-home final exam. There are no specific prerequisites, but it is expected that students will have done some prior relevant coursework in African American Studies, cultural studies, or U.S. literature. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 005 REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH, GENDER, AND POLITICS IN AFRICA: A SOUTHERN AFRICA PERSPECTIVE.

Instructor(s): Shingairai A Feresu (sferesu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will consider reproductive health of women, gender inequalities, and politics of health in Africa with a special focus on Southern Africa. The course is designed for mid-level to upper level undergraduate Afro-American and African studies, women studies, social science courses, and students planning international careers or internships. This course will discuss the background, dynamics, and underpinnings of health practices in Africa in the broader social context. Comparisons of Southern Africa to other parts of Africa will be made throughout the course. The course will explore how gender relations and cultural practices influence health. The macroeconomic and political context and their impact on health in this continent also will be considered. The course will focus on the AIDS crisis in Southern Africa and strategies necessary to compact the epidemic as a specific case study. Other reproductive health issues including sexually transmitted diseases, other reproductive tract infections, family planning, and maternal mortality and morbidity also will be discussed in this course. The main questions we will address are: is the African woman uniquely vulnerable to poor access to health care? Is there a way the African woman can be meaningfully empowered in a sustainable way to promote and control her reproductive health without creating dependency? How can we as ambassadors of health or activists help create improved health status of mothers and their families in a cost effective manner? The course will use techniques from public health, the medical sciences, and epidemiology in articulating health problems and strategies by engaging students in dialogue and problem solving techniques through lectures, group discussions, and case studies. No prior knowledge of Africa or the health sciences is assumed. Required text will posted on the web prior to beginning of class. Assessment of student performance in the course will be through a case study, group project, and a small student end-of-term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 006 Cultural Psychology of Immigrants. Meets with Psychology 401.004

Instructor(s): Ram Mahalingham (ramawasi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 401.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 477 / NRE 477. Women and the Environment.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dorceta Taylor (dorceta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). (Cross-Area Courses). Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/nre/477/001.nsf

This course explores issues related to gender, race, class, and environmental inequality. It looks at the historical role of women in the environment in the U.S., explores the development of environmental ideologies, and looks at the relationship between women, environment, and social justice. It examines environmental sub-movements like ecofeminism and environmental justice. The course also examines gender and inequality in the international context. In particular, it focuses on women and development issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 486. Communication Media in the Black World: Print Media.

African-American Studies

Section 001 History of the African American Press. Meets with Communication Studies 458.001.

Instructor(s): Catherine A Squires (squiresc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~squiresc/pressyll.htm

This course gives students in-depth knowledge of the history of the African American press from the antebellum era to the present. Through readings, discussions, and short papers, students will investigate relationships between the Black press, Black political ideas and social movements, and mainstream news coverage of African Americans.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 Telling their Stories: Black Autobiography and Identity Politics in the Americas. (1 Credit). (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): Lesley Feracho (ferachol@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (1-2). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class will look at the autobiographies of Blacks of the Americas in order to answer important questions about identity politics and nation building:

  • How do Black men and women use different autobiographical forms to explore the different facets of identity: race, class, gender, sexuality, and religion?
  • What are the external factors that affect the ways in which autobiographical subjects must construct their identities?
  • How do the politics of publication and readership affect this process?
  • In what historical moment were these autobiographies written?
  • What comparisons can be made between the Black autobiographical texts of Latin America and those of Anglophone America, particularly as part of a dialogue with the historical and political projects of nation building in the region and the specific country of each text?
  • How do these subjects dialogue with the traditional autobiographical form and reshape it to fit their particular social and political realities?

In order to answer these questions this course will look at autobiographies from Cuba and Brazil. As countries whose very identities are made up of multiple racial groups and ethnicities we will study the ways in which this diversity affects how its citizens define themselves. The autobiographies chosen will include the only slave narrative written to date in Latin America by Juan Francisco Manzano, Esteban Montejo's accounts of his life during the war for Cuban independence, Maria Castillo's accounts of her life as a Black Cuban woman in the 20th century, and Carolina Maria de Jesus' diary of a Black woman's survival in a Brazilian favela. Our discussions of these texts will be supplemented by cultural information, video, and music that expand on each country's social and political history. Students will be expected to give occasional presentations on a specific text and present a final written investigation of a text of their choice discussed in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 Regionalism, Racial Identity, and Conspicuous Consumption. (1 credit). Meets March 5-April 4. (Drop/Add deadline=March 11).

Instructor(s): Jack Kerkering (jackk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (1-2). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines how racial identity serves as a marker of elevated class status by enabling "conspicuous consumption," or the social display of wealth and leisure. Commencing with recent accounts of this phenomenon, the course then turns to the American 1890s, the period when the drive for conspicuous consumption first began to make identity a luxury item. The first identities to be consumed as luxuries were the regional identities marketed to the leisure class through regionalist fiction. In the work of later African-American writers the conventions of regionalism were adapted to display the identity not just of a place but also of a race, thereby making racial identity available as an object of conspicuous consumption. Readings for this course will include contemporary criticism by Adolph Reed, Kenneth Warren, Richard Broadhead, and Roberto Dainotto; primary readings will include Thorstein Veblen's The Theory of the Leisure Class (1899), Sarah Orne Jewett's The Country of the Pointed Firs (1896), Charles Chesnutt's The Conjure Woman (1899), W.E.B. DuBois' The Souls of Black Folk (1903), and Pauline Hopkins' Of One Blood (1903). Course requirements include class attendance and participation, weekly response papers, and a 6-8 page final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 003 Defining Freedom in the Post-slavery British Caribbean. (1 credit). March 4 to April 1. (Drop/Add deadline=March 8).

Instructor(s): Juanita De Barros (debarros@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (1-2). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The legal end of slavery in the British Caribbean is a significant historical moment, an event that marked the end of one era and the beginning of another. Yet the freedom that arrived in 1838 was elusive and contested. This course examines the attempts of former slaves to ensure that de jure freedom became freedom in fact. By exploring the process by which freed Afro-Creoles attempted to realize freedom - establishing free villages, engaging in peasant agriculture, and tentatively organizing themselves as a working class - in three British Caribbean colonies (Jamaica, Guyana, Barbados), this course charts the efforts of the emancipated population to define freedom and, in the process, to define a new post-emancipation political, economic, and cultural order. We will focus our readings on three major works that examine these colonies during the first hundred years of freedom in the British Caribbean: Thomas Holt, The Problem of Freedom: Race, Labor, and Politics in Jamaica and Britain, 1832-1938; Walter Rodney, A History of the Guyanese Working People, 1881-1905; Bonham Richardson, Panama Money in Barbados, 1900-1920. These books will be supplemented by articles that will be provided in advance. To prepare for the course, students should have some background in Caribbean history or have read Franklin Knight's The Caribbean: The Genesis of a Fragmented Nationalism or Eric William's From Columbus to Castro: The History of the Caribbean, 1492-1969 or some other overview. As well as regular attendance and participation, the course requirements include one seminar presentation and one final essay (6-8 pages).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 510. Supervised Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual study under the direction of a departmental staff member. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CAAS 521 / SOC 521. African American Intellectual Thought.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alford A Young Jr (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior standing. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to explore some debates and arguments constructed by African American scholars on the "Negro Problem." The objective will be to ascertain how African American scholarly debate and commentary has framed definitions of, and has posed solutions for, the social condition of the African American community throughout the twentieth century. More specifically, we will consider how these scholars framed their arguments within larger intellectual and disciplinary frameworks. In doing so, we will attend to the historical contexts that circumscribe these arguments. This course will involve seminar-style discussion. Students will be evaluated on a research paper that explores some dimension of African American scholarly inquiry on a social issue of pertinence to Black Americans. There also will be brief written assignments that will facilitate the development of the term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 533 / AMCULT 533 / HISTORY 572. Black Civil Rights from 1900.

African-American Studies

Section 001 The Origins of Black Studies

Instructor(s): Kevin Gaines (gainesk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will discuss a selection of the more influential texts for the formation and development of the field of Black Studies. Texts include:

Drake and Cayton, Black Metropolis;
Frazier, Black Bourgeoisie;
Clark, Dark Ghetto;
C.L.R. James, The History of Pan-African Revolt;
Du Bois, Black Reconstruction;
Jones, Blues People;
Murray, The Omni-Americans;
Cruse, Crisis of the Negro Intellectual;
Fanon, Wretched of the Earth;
Carmichael and Hamilton, Black Power;
Ladner, The Death of White Sociology;
Grier and Cobbs, Black Rage;
Cade, The Black Woman;
Lorde, Sister Outsider;
Raboteau, Slave Religion;
West, Prophecy Deliverance;
Gates, Black Literature and Literary Theory;
Carby, Reconstructing Womanhood;
Drake, Black Folk Here and There;
Asante, The Afrocentric Idea;
Gilroy, The Black Atlantic.

Requirements: regular attendance and active participation, one 5-8 page book review, one 15-20 page review essay discussing a minimum of three texts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 Comparative Slavery in a Circum-Atlantic Perspective. Meets with History 604.001, American Culture 699.001, Women's Studies 698.003.

Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 604.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 READINGS IN BLACK LABOR HISTORY.

Instructor(s): Kenneth Brown (krbrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will investigate the alchemy of race, class, and gender as they related to the history of African American labor. Exactly what 'the' dominate force driving Black labor history is hotly contested terrain. Many scholars believe in a Marxist dialectical interpretation of the dynamics of Black labor. Traditional "race men/women" adhere to the ever-present reality of racism as the true determinant motivating the historical environment in which Black labor history has developed. Black womenist scholars have complicated this discourse with a significantly modified interpretation of labor history in general and Black labor in particular emphasizing a gender oriented analysis in order to gain a comprehensive understands of the subject. This course will engage each of these arguments. Students will attempt to select and defend a position that answers the question of which dynamics is dominant or, if not which one, than which combination of these dynamics drives the phenomenon. This is a readings course, and students will be required to read a book per week on average with short weekly e-mail reviews and commentary. There will be several videos and a small course pack of selected articles to view and read. Classroom participation is mandatory in order to facilitate the student lead dialogue. The final will be a 15-25 page paper on topic chosen be the student and approved by the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 003 Globalization and the Information Society: Information Systems and International Communications Policy. Meets with Information 607.001.

Instructor(s): Derrick L Cogburn (dcogburn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This graduate seminar is an initiative of the Alliance for Community Technology and designed to contribute to the Information Economics, Management and Policy (IEMP) specialization of the University of Michigan School of Information, and the information technology specialization coordinated by the Vodacom LINK Centre at the University of the Witwatersrand Graduate School of Public & Development Management in South Africa. The seminar uses a unique, interactive, Web-based multimedia approach and collaborative resources to explore the socioeconomic, political, and cultural implications of globalization and the ongoing development of a knowledge-based information society. While the seminar takes a global approach, particular emphasis is developing world.

Given the fundamental transformation engendered by globalization, it is imperative that students interested in the converging interdisciplinary fields of information systems, broadcasting, information and communications technology, and international communications policy have exciting opportunities to engage in cutting-edge educational and learning opportunities, preparing them for these new global realities.

This seminar provides such a learning opportunity by breaking the boundaries of space, time, and distance by immersing participants from each university in key selections of the relevant literature and by fostering a deeper theoretical and critical understanding of the issues covered. It employs a suite of Web-based tools to create a globally networked collaborative learning environment. The seminar has a mix of synchronous and asynchronous activities and provides participants with continuous feedback, high levels of interaction and an emphasis on both individual work and group projects.

Prerequisites: SI 501 or permission of instructor

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CAAS 615 / ANTHRCUL 612. Seminar on Problems in African Ethnology.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kelly Askew (kaskew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The discipline of anthropology owes much of its foundational knowledge and paradigms to studies in African ethnology. In this seminar, we will explore some of the links between the birth of anthropology and ethnographic research in Africa and sample a range of approaches to ethnographic writing and practice spanning the last half-century. Issues to be covered include: urbanization and migrancy; consumption and the circulation of commodities; gender politics; the modernity of witchcraft; inquiry into the senses; the construction of ethnic, national, and transnational communities; and the negotiation of war and violence. In an effort to tease out differences in ethnographic style and approach, we will do cluster readings of two or more ethnographies on a shared topic or region. Anticipate a heavy reading load of a book a week and two mid-sized (10-15pp.) writing assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 634 / SOC 634. The Urban Ethnographic Tradition: Theory, Method, Standpoint.

Section 001 (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Alford A Young Jr (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; seniors with permission of instructor. (3-4).

Credits: (3-4,3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 634.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 651 / POLSCI 659. Proseminar in Governments and Politics of Africa.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer A Widner (jwidner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jwidner/ps659.html

See Political Science 659.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 798 / HISTORY 798. Seminar in Comparative Studies in History.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 EmpiresStates&Polit Imaginatio.

Instructor(s): Frederick Cooper (fcooper@umich.edu) , Jane R

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 798.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 828 / DOC 828. Human, Economic, and Community Development.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John M Wallace Jr (johnwall@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Doctoral standing and Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Undergraduate Course Listings for CAAS.


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