College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in American Culture


This page was created at 4:26 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in American Culture
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for AMCULT

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for American Culture.


AMCULT 401. Race and Racialization in the Americas.

Section 001 Ethnic Modernisms: Early 20th Century.

Instructor(s): Maria E Cotera (mcotera@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Amer. Cult. 212 or 213, and 312. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/amcult/401/001.nsf

During the inter-war years, and indeed from the start of the twentieth century, a dramatic re-visioning of American values was underway. In the words of historian Frederick Hoffman, "a phase of American culture and history (variously called Puritan, industrial, commercial) was repudiated and scorned; in its place, writers, artists, critics sought for aspects of the American scene that had (or were alleged to have) escaped involvement in the worst disasters of that culture." At the center of this search was a growing interest in the "others" of American imperialism, the African-Americans, American Indians, and Mexican-Americans whose rural communities were transformed by the march of modernization and westward expansion.

In this course we will explore the emergence of a discourse of American identity that was at times based on an intimate relationship with, and appropriation of non "Anglo-Saxon" subjects (as in Anglo American forms of modernist primitivism), and at times founded upon the rigid separation of white from non-white peoples (what Walter Benn Michaels has termed "nativist modernism"). In both cases, this process meant that Anglo American intellectuals were coming to terms with the legacy of colonialism, and for the first time perhaps, comprehending it's centrality to American identity. But the re-evaluation of what it meant to be a modern American was not just a concern of Anglo American intellectuals. While the profound ambivalence toward traditional American values which characterized Anglo American musings on the nature of collective identity generally led to an objectification of the "Other", it nevertheless opened a space for colonized peoples to enter into the conversation about the future of American culture and identity. Indeed, the period witnessed the rise of a generation of American Indian, African American, and Mexican American intellectuals, who, responding to the social and economic transformations that modernity had brought to their communities, and energized by the aesthetic and cultural possibilities wrought in Anglo-America's exploration of itself, formed coalitions and organizations across regional, national, and tribal boundaries to address the role that they would play in the modern nation-state. While their strategies for incorporation into this American dialogue generally corresponded to the ways in which dominant discourse had figured them, these intellectuals also manipulated this discourse to achieve the social, economic, and political goals that they sought.

In this course we will examine the specific social and economic transformations in colonialist ideology which led to the re-conceptualization of collective identity on the part of this emergent cadre of intellectuals, and the ways in which the limits of these ideological configurations shaped both the aesthetic and the political practices of American Indian, African American, and Latino subjects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 422. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites: Amer. Cult. 323 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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AMCULT 423. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites: Amer. Cult. 422 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Ojibwa 422.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 432 / HISTART 420. National Identity in American Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and any prior coursework in history of art, American culture, or American history. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 420.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 461 / ANTHRCUL 461 / LING 461. Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek (bameek@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 461.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 490 / FILMVID 451. American Film Genres.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (4). Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/amcult/490/001.nsf

A historical and critical survey of the film genres that have shaped the global profile and internal functioning of the U.S. film industry since the early 20th century. Placed in a broad cultural context, the linkages between film genres and other forms of American popular culture will be addressed, as well as the impact of technological, cultural, and sociopolitical change on the conventions, styles, and modes of spectatorship associated with specific genres. Special attention will be given to the reciprocal effects of film genres on the shaping of gendered and ethnic identities. This term, we will be focusing on genres that treat the theme of modern romance during moments of instability in the film industry, as well as in gender and class relations in the society at large: the musical, melodrama, and romantic comedy.

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AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Asian American Psychology. (4 credits). Meets with Psychology 401.003

Instructor(s): Phillip Akutsu (akutsu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3-4). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/amcult/496/001.nsf

This course will provide a critical analysis of cultural, sociopolitical, and historical influences that contributed to the study of Asian American psychology. Topics in the course will be varied and include Asian American personality and identity structures; intergroup/intragroup relations, communication styles, and conflict formation/resolution; family roles/dynamics and intrafamilial stress/conflicts; acculturation, ethnic identity, and multicultural identity formation; prejudice, discrimination, and culturally-imbedded stress/trauma; and health/mental health status and help-seeking/coping strategies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 Ralph Ellison and the Blues Aesthetic.

Instructor(s): Paul A Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3-4). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"I am an invisible man. No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms. I am a man of substance, of flesh and bone, fiber, and liquids and I might even be said to possess a mind. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me. Like the bodiless heads you see sometimes in circus sideshows, it is as though I have been surrounded by mirrors of hard, distorting glass. When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves, or figments of their imagination indeed, everything and anything expect me."

So begins Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man (1952), certainly one of the most influential and widely discussed African American novels of the twentieth century. This senior seminar will dedicate considerable time to reading Ellison's classic novel and to interpreting it in historical context. We will also survey the non-fiction writings of Ellison (1914-1994), paying particular attention to his theories about African American and American cultural identity as reflected in the languages and rhythms of literary, political, and musical expression (especially the blues and jazz). Invisible Man, for example, addressed these issues through a strikingly imaginative and controversial depiction of the unnamed main character's "progress" through a series of African American and American political, educational, and cultural institutions and social worlds in the mid-twentieth century. Using Ellison as a partial guide to mid-20th century African American intellectual life, we will also explore the multi-ethnic roots of Ellison's intellectual world, controversies surrounding his writings and ideas, and his impact on later writers. Other authors and critics discussed or read here will include assorted Harlem Renaissance writers, Black leftists, separatists, and liberals, Nation of Islam spokesmen, writers and activists from the 1960s Black Arts movement, and more recent literary artists and postmodernist critics.

Grades will be determined on the basis of attendance, active participation, short reading quizzes or written commentaries, two short papers (4-6 pp. each), an in-class midterm, and a take-home final exam. There are no specific prerequisites, but it is expected that students will have done some prior relevant coursework in African American Studies, cultural studies, or U.S. literature. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 003 P.T. Barnum's America: MassCult. (4 Credits). Meets with History 396.002.

Instructor(s): James W Cook (jwcook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3-4). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 396.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 004 AFRICAN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN THE 20TH CENTURY. (4 Credits). Meets with History 397.001.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3-4). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 397.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 005 Imperialism & Pacific Islands, 19th Century. (3 Credits). Meets with Hist 498.003.

Instructor(s): Damon Salesa

Prerequisites: (3-4). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/history/498/003.nsf

This course engages with the histories of the Pacific, treating them throughout as cross-cultural histories of encounter and entanglement. As the largest feature on Earth, the Pacific Ocean dominates the globe, and the encounter of European and American people with its expanse was, in many ways, critical. These encounters were also critical to the peoples indigenous to the Pacific, and it is with both of these strands of experience that this course engages.

Topics covered in the course are diverse, including imperial politics and diplomacy; trade, exploration, and commerce; science and art; and transformations in indigenous politics, society, technology, intellectual life, and health.

The period under view is what might be called the Pacific's long nineteenth century, which began when Pacific Islanders and Europeans first had meaningful meetings with each other, and when the Pacific was propelled into the foreground of the Europe's Enlightenment imagination. The century came to a close with the great powers dividing the Pacific amongst themselves. We will focus on the archipelagos of Hawaii, Samoa and Tahiti, and the imperial powers of the United States and Britain, but attention will also be given to most other areas in the Pacific, and other imperial incursions, including those of France, Spain, and Germany.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Feminist, Queer, and Oppositional Art. (3 credits). Meets with Art 454.006 and Women's Studies 483.009.

Instructor(s): Carol Jacobsen (jacobsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3-4). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 483.009.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 504 / SOC 504. American Immigration: Sociological Perspectives.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 504.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 510. Topics in Ethnic Studies.

Section 001 Refugees From A World on Fire: U.S.-Third World Feminist Methodologies. Meets with Women's Studies 698.001.

Instructor(s): Maria E Cotera (mcotera@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 698.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 510. Topics in Ethnic Studies.

Section 002 Race and Public Policy.

Instructor(s): Paul Wong (paulwong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/amcult/510/002.nsf

This is an interdisciplinary course that focuses on how race and racism affect public policy. We will discuss and analyze how and under what circumstances should race be used in public policy. The interactions among race, ethnicity, class, and gender in the development of social problems and public policies will be examined. Comparative studies of African Americans, Asian Pacific Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and the more recent immigrant groups will be undertaken. Topics such as health disparities and access to healthcare, voting rights, immigration reform, race profiling, sentencing, affirmative action, welfare reform, and housing segregation will be addressed.

For further information, please email paulwong@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 533 / CAAS 533 / HISTORY 572. Black Civil Rights from 1900.

Section 001 The Origins of Black Studies

Instructor(s): Kevin Gaines (gainesk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: CAAS 201 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 533.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 616 / HISTORY 612. Native American History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Liza Black (lizab@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/history/612/001.nsf

Students will explore major themes in American Indian historiography including policy, gender, economy, and culture in an effort to understand past themes and future directions of American Indian history. Course grade based on several book reviews, 5-7 pages in length. Some books are assigned; others are chosen by students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 698. American Culture in Comparative Perspectives.

Section 001 Modernity & Difference.

Instructor(s): Paul A Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; upperclassmen with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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AMCULT 699. Periods in American Culture: Literary.

Section 001 Comparative Slavery in a Circum-Atlantic Perspective. Meets with Women's Studies 698.003, History 604.001, CAAS 558.001.

Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 604.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 699. Periods in American Culture: Literary.

Section 002 Black Marxism: African American Radical Culture in the mid-20th Century. Meets with English 626.001.

Instructor(s): Alan M Wald (awald@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 626.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 699. Periods in American Culture: Literary.

Section 003 Theories of Feminism. Meets with Women's Studies 530.001.

Instructor(s): Hannah Rosen (hrosen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 530.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 699. Periods in American Culture: Literary.

Section 004 Cultural Analysis: Bodies, Language, Discourse. Meets with German 822.002 and History 698.002.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu) , Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 822.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 850. Advanced Graduate Seminar in Primary Research.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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AMCULT 899. Special Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

It is expected that each student will do substantial work in more than one discipline and that the course of study will delineate appropriate research skills to be acquired and theoretical concerns to be explored An American Culture graduate student will be required to complete an introductory research seminar in the student's field of interest. The option of satisfying this requirement in American Culture 699 or 899 is available for those students who do not have another appropriate seminar that fits their interests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Colin R Johnson

Prerequisites: GSTA award. Graduate Standing. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Winter Academic Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

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