College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Cultural Anthropology


This page was created at 4:29 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Cultural Anthropology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ANTHRCUL

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.


ANTHRCUL 400 / CAAS 405. Field Studies.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin Holl

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (8).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The field Studies course provides students with an opportunity to participate to a unique, original, and exciting research in West Africa. Students will be trained in fundamental methods and techniques of archaeological survey, excavation, artifact recording, data analysis, map drafting. They will participate in an ongoing research project of the "Dembala Valley Archaeological Project" (DeVAP) entitled "SETTLEMENT DYNAMICS, PRODUCTION, AND CRAFTS IN EASTERN SENEGAL." Field training is integrated with lectures on archaeological methods and theory, and the Archaeology of West Africa.

Data processing sessions introduce students to the analysis of archaeological artifacts, pottery, animal bones, stone tools, as well as plant remains. Each student is required to take notes on a daily basis that are read and commented on at the end of each week. The students will later use these notes to write an extensive 30-40 pages report. For those who may be interested a complementary "Archaeology Laboratory Studies" course is offered after the field season. In this sense, students will learn more about the long term curation of archaeological materials in museums contexts.

Course requirements include daily excavation notes and a 30-40 page research report. The intended audience is undergraduates with concentration in Anthropology, Archaeology, Afroamerican and African studies. Hours per week and Format are eight hours/day, five days/week, for ten weeks. Base: Tambacounda, Field Season: January 15 to March 20, 2002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 401 / CAAS 406. Archaeology Laboratory Studies.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin Holl

Prerequisites: Junior standing; concurrent enrollment in Anthro. 400. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course aims to train students in core archaeological processing of excavated remains. It involves restoration, description, drafting, as well as cataloging. Students must be concurrently enrolled in ANTHRCUL 400 in order to take this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 409. Peoples and Cultures of the Near East and North Africa.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew J Shryock (ashryock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of anthropological approaches to the cultures of what is now called "the Middle East," a region extending from Morocco to Iran. Primary attention is given to Arabic-speaking, Muslim societies. We will examine enduring topics of interest, such as tribalism, kinship, gender, and Islam. We also will explore new problems (and styles of analysis) that call older interest into question. These include (trans)nationalism, mass culture, the political consequences of popular literacy, globalization, diasporas, and novel forms of ethnographic engagement with these topics. Finally, the course addresses the growing number of Middle Eastern communities that now live outside the region, with a special focus on Arabs in Detroit. Classes will include a mix of lecture and discussion, and readings will be drawn mostly from recent monographs. Grades will be based on two essays, with an additional short paper for graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 420. Anthropology of Contemporary American Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Upton (rupton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in anthropology. (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Anthropology 420 will address contemporary issues in American social life, including but not limited to, the meaning of the family and kinship, the concept of American "culture", religion, meanings and constructions of identity, class structure and the role of the body in everyday life. We will take as central the concept and construction of gender as a defining aspect for individuals in the U.S. and will use various media sources to explore and highlight these issues. We will examine what is meant by American "culture" itself and explore issues which surround "doing" anthropology in the United States. Students will be expected to be able to apply advanced concepts in anthropological discourse to these issues and two previous courses in Anthropology are required. Students will be evaluated based upon completion of short response papers, exams, and a final paper. Graduate students may take the course for Rackham credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 427 / CAAS 427 / WOMENSTD 427. African Women.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elisha P Renne (erenne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One course in African Studies, anthropology, or women's studies. AAS 200 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/caas/427/001.nsf

See CAAS 427.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 429. Television, Society, and Culture.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Conrad P Kottak (ckottak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Television has been compared to a new religion, cultivating homogeneity, uniting adherents in a common set of images and symbols. Television executives, commentators and reporters have become "key gatekeepers" assuming roles played historically by political and religious leaders. TV has been labeled "narcoticizing" and faulted for diverting attention from serious social issues and replacing effective thought and action with passive absorption in portrayals. Television has been said to reinforce existing hierarchies and impede social reform. It also stimulates participation in a worldwide cash economy, and TV's worldwide spread has raised concerns about cultural imperialism. Ethnocentrism is common in the evaluation of television and its effects. Understanding of TV impact can be broadened through a cross-cultural approach to this medium, which, specific content and programming aside, must be recognized as one of the most powerful information disseminators, socializing agents and public-opinion molders in the contemporary world. This seminar will consider cross-cultural diversity in TV and will assess the medium's various social, cultural, and psychological dimensions and effects. Students, who will include seniors, concentrators and graduate students in American Culture, Communication, Anthropology, and other related fields will each investigate an aspect of television. Students will be responsible for attending class, organizing and participating in discussions of particular readings, and presenting, orally to the class and in writing, a term paper based on research concerning some aspect of TV impact. In Winter 2002 the course will focus especially on media portrayals of work, family, and the work/family interface. Specifically, what do media portrayals suggest to us about the nature and value of work and family, their competing demands, and how we should balance work and family obligations and responsibilities. Students will be expected to choose a topic related to this theme for their individual projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 3

ANTHRCUL 438. Urban Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Carol Hart (janeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What characterizes life in an urban society? What are the common features and/or variations between urban societies situated in different cultural and historical contexts? In addressing such questions, this course will be organized around two broad concerns: (1) the anthropology of cities: the main factors shaping the nature of urban life, the historical emergence of urban forms, and different forms of urbanism; and (2) anthropology in cities: examining themes such as social networks, class, gender, idioms of identity, and the status of institutions, with reference to specific ethnographic accounts. Topics will be addressed through lectures and classroom discussion and will be based on the reading of required texts. Assessment will be based on two take-home exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 453 / CAAS 454. African-American Culture.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in the social sciences. CAAS 201 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the Afro-American as one example of how humans live. It places distinctive Black behavior within its social context and its history. It reminds of middle-class Jews in Nazi Germany who believed that success would make you full citizens. It ponders that great (although restricted) contributions that African Americans have made to white identity, the U.S. nation and economy, fashion, youth rebellion, gay and women's rights, and entertainment. An understanding of African Americans enlightens the nature of systemic oppression and explains the anomalies of Native America, Jack Johnson, Paul Robeson, Joe Louis, Jackie Robinson, Tiger Woods, Michael Jordan, Venus Williams, W. Arthur Lewis, Toni Morrison, Ralph Bunche, E. Franklin Frazier and many others. This course looks at the future of African-Americans in a millennium in which the memory of their oppressions and reparations seem lost.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 457. The Film and Other Visual Media in Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: An introductory course in cultural anthropology, American culture, women's studies, or film and video studies. (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

New approaches to the study of film which focus on how cultural issues are represented, negotiated and contested in a wide range of documentary, ethnographic, and narrative films showing students how the construction of "otherness" and modern "selfhood" are played out in films. Moving from the "voyage out" to the "voyage in," the course parallels the way anthropology as a discipline has moved from an emphasis on differences to a desire to map points of contact and identification, and understand the otherness in our own midst.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 – Art and the Anthropological Imagination.

Instructor(s): Stephen Pastner

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Taught by an anthropologist/sculptor, this course focuses on the analysis and production of narrative visual art that derives from, and itself informs, more traditional anthropological and historical scholarship – an art genre commonly marginalized by both anthropologists and art-historians. The format of the course will combine lectures, group discussions, formal student presentations and art practicum elements. Evaluation criteria will, for most students, include production of a work of art based on scholarly research, and a paper and presentation describing its genesis and development. However, for the resolutely "left brained" who may wish to forego the art project, additional writing assignments will be possible. There will also be participation in one of several collaborative class presentations and the possibility of one or more exams/quizzes. In addition to the required texts and "course pack", students electing to do an art project should anticipate some art-materials expenses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 – Language & Socialization. Meets with Ling 492.005, Psych 551.244, and Ling 792.005.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek (bameek@umich.edu) , Marilyn J Shatz (mshatz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on how language use relates to socialization into a group. We will examine this relationship with respect to topics such as identity formation, personhood, socioeconomic status, race, and cognition. We will read from the recent literature comparing these various aspects of socialization across different speech communities and then discuss questions such as the following. What kinds of (contextual, linguistic, developmental) constraints impact socialization? What is the nature of and how does the relationship between language and socialization vary across different contexts? Do the levels of analysis in the current research provide reasonable descriptions of both differences and similarities across contexts? We also will discuss where we would like to see future language-socialization research go. Along with class discussion, we will also participate in workshops sponsored by the Consortium on Language, Society, and Thought which has invited guest speakers to talk on topics related to our course. Upper-level or graduate student status is required. Some background in developmental or cognitive psychology, linguistics, cognitive or linguistic anthropology would be helpful. Course requirements include preparation for and active participation in class discussions, workshop attendance, and a paper on a topic related to the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 – Muslims Under and After Socialism: Former Soviet Union, China and Eastern Europe. Meets with AAPTIS 491.001, Asian Studies 380.001, AAPTIS 591.001, and History 449.001

Instructor(s): Morgan Liu (morgman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 491.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 3, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 461 / AMCULT 461 / LING 461. Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek (bameek@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore how Native North American languages are used in relation to the historical circumstances, cultural practices, and social settings of their speakers. Of particular concern is the interrelationship between linguistic practice and ideologies that can either promote or discourage the use (and maintenance) of these languages. We will focus on topics such as the relationship between language and landscape, oral narratives, language and thought, dominant/subordinate language contact situations, sign language, and literacy. No special background is required, but students should have upper-level or graduate student status. Course requirements include preparation for and active participation in discussions, three short book reviews, a midterm exam, and a paper on a topic related to the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 489. Maya and Central American Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joyce Marcus (joymar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course emphasizes the archaeology and cultural evolution of the ancient Maya, whose civilization once extended from eastern Mexico through Guatemala and Belize into El Salvador and Honduras. Stages of development include hunters and gatherers, egalitarian villagers, emerging rank, and the state. Topics include religion, social organization, architecture, political hierarchies, subsistence strategies, settlement patterns, exchange systems, and hieroglyphic writing. The required textbook is Robert Sharer's, The Ancient Maya (available in paperback at Shaman Drum Bookstore, 313 South State Street). The grade is based on a paper (midterm) and on the in-class final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 527. Traditions of Ethnology II.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Erik A Mueggler (mueggler@umich.edu) , Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A continuation of Traditions in Ethnology I. It covers the period from about 1950 to the present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 530. Oral History and Narrative Identity.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Carol Hart (janeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Oral histories are spoken memories about the past. In "managed" or negotiated conversations, subjects recall experiences which they now find relevant from a contemporary standpoint, bearing witness to the everyday, the tramatic, the spectacular and the silent. In response to prompts by interviews, speakers explain, in sometimes subtle and context-bound languages, why they believe episodes happened as they did and attempt to account for their own involvement. Methodologically, oral histories can stand alone, to be read and analyzed on their own terms, or they can supplement other "ways of knowing" to be found in archives, quantitative data bases, written records and memoirs. Through narrative, individuals and communities conceptualize social processes in the form of stories, with leading characters, plot structures, and time boundaries. From this perspective, embedded in oral histories are narratives that people use to help them make sense of various occurrences in their lives. At a broader level of abstraction, local and national cultures also create and foster "meta-narratives" or composite understandings shared by larger groups of protagonists at particular points in history. This course is about oral histories and other specifically narrative constructions of selfhood. We will cover various theories and debates surrounding oral history and narrative, and read several ethnographies which utillize these concepts. Student evaluations will be based on class participation, several short writing assignmnts and in-class exercises, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 537. Anthropological Praxis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Principal intellectual trends and debates in contemporary anthropological theory and practice. Emphasis on demonstrating the intersections between academic and applied anthropology. Students will study anthropological praxis as theory, research methodology, and social intervention.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 541. Ecological Approaches in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Fricke (tomf@umich.edu) , Stuart A Kirsch (skirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior, graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3). Credit is granted for a total of six credits elected through Anthro. 541 and 586.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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ANTHRCUL 553. Blurred Genres: Autobiography, Fiction & Ethnography.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 – Gender and Health: Ethnographic Approaches. Meets with HBEHED 655.001, AAPTIS 592.001, and Women's Studies 698.005

Instructor(s): Marcia Inhorn (minhorn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 698.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 – Qualitative Methods and Proposal Writing. Meets with HBEHED 637.001.

Instructor(s): Marcia Inhorn (minhorn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This interdisciplinary seminar is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the qualitative research enterprise from an explicitly anthropological (ethnographic) perspective. The course focuses on ethics and entrée to the research setting, qualitative research design, interview-based and observational data collection methods, and ethnographic grant proposal preparation. The course is skill-based, and students will conduct a number of methodological assignments in and out of the classroom (including a genealogy and analysis; an unstructured interview, transcription, and case summary; an observation in the community, with fieldnotes, coding, and indexing; and development of a semistructured interview schedule). The major written assignment is a grant proposal, in National Science Foundation format, on a topic chosen by the student; the proposal is intended to incorporate the ethnographic research designs and methods discussed in class. The seminar is a meet-together, and HBEHED (Public Health) is the home department. The course, however, is ideal for anthropology students who are preparing for field research and wish to write an NSF Doctoral Dissertation grant. Students will purchase a packet of readings for the course, as well as H. Russell Bernard's Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches. Enrollment is limited, so students interested in taking the course must seek permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 – Contested Childhood In A Changing Global Order. Meets With Human Behavior (Social Work) 718.001.

Instructor(s): Pamela F Reynolds

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~iinet/asc/contested/contested_base.html

One aim of the seminar is to examine how children are represented in public policy and cultural politics, and how transformations in nation states and institutions affect children and are, in turn, affected by the young. The nature of the times calls for meticulous attention to and acknowledgement of contestations that imbue young lives with inordinate stress. Another aim is to stimulate theory and influence policy by taking a broad view of the manner in which we conceive of childhood, especially in disputation, and to describe the effects of ideas and policy on children's passage from conception to full citizenship.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 004 – Children in Armed Conflict. Meets with Social Work 719.001

Instructor(s): Pamela F Reynolds

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The situation of children in armed conflict is currently a major concern among those who focus on the interests of the young and among those whose interest is in the propagation of Human Rights and International legislation to restrict the involvement of children in war to limit harm done to them. During the course, the situation of children in recent and on-going conflicts will be examined and the nature and causes of their participation will be analyzed. We shall begin by looking at the role of children in past wars and at the possible reasons for the absence of detailed documentation of it. We shall consider why the engagement of the young in warfare is pruned from the archive. We shall discuss the romance of war and reflect on the possible influence on children of ideals to do with bravery and heroism that imbue stories about and images of combat.

The course will examine written evidence for data on recruitment, training, treatment, deployment, and political engagement of the young during periods of armed conflict. A particular focus will be on the participation of the young in resistance movements and their acquisition of political consciousness. In accord with this, we shall take account of their rejection of the manner in which they are often categorized once war has ended and of some political compromises that accompany the return to peace.

Material will be presented that deals with the harm war does, including the damage wrought on children's bodies by land mines; their predicament when born as a consequence of rape; and the callous targeting of children as members of civilian populations during the conduct of war. Representations of children's terror and suffering in the media will lead us into a consideration of its use and abuse. Finally, we shall look at various ways in which conflicts are brought to an end and the attention that is given to children's needs in the process. Patterns of healing and ideas about trauma will be traced with regard to recent formulations of diagnosis, counseling, and attempts to lay the ghosts of the past.

Active participation in the seminar discussions and co-leading one of the sessions are requirements. Co-leading requires additional preparation and consultation with the instructor. Each student is expected to write a brief (3-5 pages) critical response paper every fortnight reflecting on some part (or all) of the required readings assigned during that time. The responses will constitute part of the final assessment and will guide our exploration. Each student will write a research paper (20-25 pages maximum) on a substantive topic related to the course. A one-page research proposal/abstract and a list of readings is due in class after the first five weeks of meetings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 005 – Anthropology of Modernity. Meets with Institute for the Humanities 511.002.

Instructor(s): Webb Keane (wkeane@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

To a significant extent, the sciences of society emerged as an effort to grasp the condition of modernity. Anthropology originally had a peculiar role in this effort, offering the perspective of modernity's "other" – but since that other was primarily defined by contrast to modernity, the latter could still be said to be the motivating problem. Recent generations of anthropologists have increasingly taken modernity to be their central ethnographic topic. At the same time, the very concept of modernity has fallen into question.

This course has two purposes. The first is to examine the ideas of modernity as they have been proposed or presumed in some of the foundational texts in social theory. The second is to look at how, in practice, anthropologists have attempted to take on the study of modernity as an ethnographic project. Within the vast spectrum of aspects of modernity in play, this course will tend to focus on problems of culture, language, and subjectivity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 572 / LING 542. Introduction to Sociolinguistics.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ann Lesley Milroy (amilroy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Ling. 514 or graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 542.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 577. Language as Social Action.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Anthro. 576. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Develops a framework for viewing languages as a social, cultural, and political matrix, a form of action through which social relations, cultural forms, ideology, and consciousness are constituted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 582. Archaeology II.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry T Wright (hwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of world prehistoric cultural development from village life to urban civilization designed as a core course for beginning anthropology graduate students. It introduces theories of the beginnings of agriculture, the development of ranked and stratified societies, and the emergence of states and empires. Exemplary data from Mesopotamia, China, Mesoamerica, and the Central Andes are used to evaluate these theories. This course is a lecture course, with a course pack and a few paperbacks, including Bruce Smith's Origin of Agriculture, and Susan Pollock's Ancient Mesopotamia. The course grade is based on a paper and an examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 612 / CAAS 615. Seminar on Problems in African Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kelly Askew (kaskew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 615.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 618 / LACS 618 / HISTORY 618. Early Ethnography in South America.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001 – Dramas, Miracles, Metaphors: Studies in Andean History.

Instructor(s): Sabine G MacCormack (sgm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Latin American and Caribbean Studies 618.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 619 / LACS 619 / HISTORY 617. Proseminar on Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001 – MESTIZAJE AND NATIONAL IDENTITY IN LATIN AMERICA. Meets with Spanish 855.001.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu) , Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Spanish 855.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 632. Comparative Analysis of Kinship.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu) , Thomas R Trautmann (ttraut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine current theoretical and methodological issues in the analysis of kinship and social relations, using case studies from Africa, Asia, Southeast Asia, Melanesia, Latin America, Europe, and North America. Certain key categories in European-American social theory e.g. "individual" and "society," "kinship," "contract," "house/hold," "corporation," "residence," "community," "person," "network" – still dominate much ethnographic and historical research on kinship and social relations. They will be among our topics of analysis, tracing connections between popular cultural assumptions and formal academic theories. In this academic term, we will focus especially on ideas and practices concerning "kin" and "kind," "genealogy" and "race," among humans and as contrasted with other animals and with plants; how particular "substances," like blood, semen, and milk are involved in these relations; varying approaches to questions of scale (e.g., through generalizing images of "blood," "individual," or "family," through censuses and other numerical forms; the bureaucratic management of human reproduction and other issues concerning the political economy of kinship.

Course requirements: This is a small, seminar-style course in which students can expect lots of reading for discussion in class and a major research paper, as well as one, perhaps more, oral presentation(s) to the class based on the reading and on the research for the term paper. Grades: Grades will be based on the term paper, the presentation(s), and contributions to class discussions. Readings: The required reading will include 8-10 books, available at the Shaman Drum Bookstore (313 State Street) and a course pack of articles, available from Accu-copy (402 Maynard Street).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 652. Ethnographic Writing.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course considers the history, politics, and possibilities of ethnographic writing. We will discuss a variety of ethnographic genres, including literary journalism, experimental ethnography, feminist ethnography, travel accounts, the memoir, poetry of witness, investigative reporting, documentary image-texts, the ethnographic novel, and autobiographical criticism. Our focus will be on the dilemmas of writing narratives of place and voice. We will analyze a range of textural strategies, including monologue, dialogue, first person narrative, third person narrative, flashback, different methods of quoting or paraphrasing "informants," and descriptive accounts of other places. In addition to familiarizing ourselves with these literary genres and textual strategies, I want to provide a workshop environment for members of the class to strengthen their own writing and embark on major ethnographic projects of their own. Students often say the don't get opportunities to try their hand at ethnographic writing before embarking on fieldwork. I hope this course will fill that need by providing a foundation for the production of more creative daring, and original writing that can speak to and beyond the academy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 – Cultural Intimacy and Mass Mediation.

Instructor(s): Andrew J Shryock (ashryock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores the relationship between mass mediated cultural forms and forms of cultural production that occur in intimate spaces, at a strategic remove from contexts of public display. We will give special attention to the means by which these seemingly distinct spheres of cultural production infiltrate, constitute, promote, and frequently undermine each other. We will consider the moral and political challenges that beset ethnographic projects located in the sensitive, often unstable zones where intimacy and mass mediation converge. Topics addressed include tourism, heritage industries, cultural exhibitions, ethnic marketing, identity politics, nation-making on television and in film, "world music," new regimes of religious instruction and experience, and the diverse articulations of public (and private) culture now emerging on these global stages of identity display. Using monographs, films, sites, and novels as a shared context of interpretation and critique, students will write short reviews, make classroom presentations, and produce a research paper (20-30 pages) that engages with intellectual problems related to the seminar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 – Anthopology/History Core Seminar. Meets with History 604.002.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu) , Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/anthrcul/658/002.nsf

This course is about theory, methods, and the craft of social research and writing, focusing on the interplay of history and anthropology. This course will be based on the internsive discussion of classical and pathbreaking articles and monographs. It is particularly intended for students in the Anthropology and History Program as well as graduate students in the Departments of History and Anthropology who are interested in developing projects which involve the integration of historical and anthropological perspectives. This course will meet once a week in the evening. Students will have the option of developing their concerns doing summer research and taking a research seminar during the Fall, whether written work and research in progress will be discussed. Students interested in taking this course are encouraged to send a brief (one page) email notice or written statement to the instructor indicating their interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 – Genocide, Tribunals, and Truth Commissions. Meets with Law 857.001.

Instructor(s): Daniel M Rothenberg (dmrothen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores the implications and significance of human rights theory and practice through a consideration of the ways in which three nations – Guatemala, Rwanda and South Africa – have responded to their experiences of institutionalized violence and mass terror. The course reviews basic ideas regarding human rights, focusing on two emerging trends: a growing interest in criminal prosecutions through domestic courts and international tribunals, and; the institutionalization of formal mechanisms, such as truth commissions, that consider the meaning of political violence in an effort to create build a more peaceful and secure future. The goal of this seminar is to present an interdisciplinary analysis of new perspectives in international human rights, combining legal scholarship and social science research to engage some of the most important justice issues within our ever more globally integrated world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 004 – Ethnography of South Asia

Instructor(s): Sharad Chari (schari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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ANTHRCUL 675. Topics in Anthropological Linguistics.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Anthro. 576 or Ling. 411 and Graduate Standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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ANTHRCUL 683. Topics in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001 – Egyptian Prehistory. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Joyce Marcus (joymar@umich.edu) , Kent V Flannery (kflanner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A graduate seminar in which students will read and report in class on a succession of classic publications concerning cultural and social evolution in the Nile Valley. The time period covered runs from 500,000 years ago to the formation of the Egyptian state.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 683. Topics in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 002 – Power and Ideology in Archaeology Theory. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

There are two major dimensions in the archaeology of ideology, the study of ancient belief systems through material culture and the ways in which modern belief systems are imposed on the reconstruction of the past. Ideology, it is argued, is not just about any belief system but concerns the institutionalized system of meanings about social, political, and economic relations and events, and specifically about who has power and how it is got. By power one refers to the real or potential ability to accomplish tasks, that is, to render some behaviors possible, while others are less possible or impossible (after E. Wolf). Since ideology is both a representation of power relations and how the representation is communicated, it seeks to control the discourse about power as well as the order of inequality in social and economic relations.

This seminar considers instrumental (top-down) and constitutive (bottom-up) aspects of ideology and power. Topics include how ideology is transmitted (in prehistoric as well as early historic societies) and who are the agents of such transmission. We shall read literature on the resistence to and growth in importance of ideology in archaeological theory, case studies from various parts of the world and in various degrees of social organization. Some topics may be taken up according to interests of the class. Seminar requirements: weekly participation and term paper.

Tentative list of topics and sample readings:

  1. History of power and ideology in archaeology (Jones, Fritz, DeMarrais et al., Miller/Tilley)
  2. I & P in social theory (Foucault, Giddens, Bourdieu, Wolf, Eagleton)
  3. Current trends in archaeological theory (Hodder, ed., )
  4. Landscape and power (Bradley, Tilley, A. Smith)
  5. Chaco "rituality" (Lekson, Renfrew, Yoffee)
  6. Factions, heterarchy, and the struggle for power (Crumley, Brumfiel)
  7. Landscape and power in ancient Mesoamerica (Koontz, et al., Inomata, Conrad/Demarest, Joyce)
  8. Agency (Dobres/Robb, etc.)
  9. Cosmology and power (Chang, Tambiah, Geertz)
  10. Resisting power (Scott, Comaroff, Patterson, Clastres)
  11. (To be determined according to student interest: Order, Legitimacy, and Wealth (Richards/Van Buren, eds), Mesopotamia (propaganda and power), Mediterranean (Corrupting Sea), World Systems critiques (Stein, Dietler), gender and power, art (esp. rock art) and power, SE (Cahokia, Mississippian, southern cult–Pauketat, Muller, Milner, Brown), climate change and social change (critiques of Diamond, Weiss, etc), historic archaeology
  12. Seminar presentations

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 691. Settlement Systems in Pre-Industrial Societies.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey R Parsons (jpar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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ANTHRCUL 692. Studies in the Origin of State.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry T Wright (hwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a seminar dealing with the the operation of developed pre-state political formation and the earliest states. In the first few sessions, I lecture on the ethnohistory of some prestate and early state formations, on anthropological theories of state formation, and on some archaeological examples of state emergence. After that, the plan for Winter 2002 is to focus in detail on southeastern North America first on the ethnohistory and second on the long term dynamics evidenced by archaeology, with consideration of current controversies about pre-state political formations. Each participant will make a presentation covering some aspect of this topic, and prepare a paper. There will a course pack, and there are a couple of paper-back books – Paul Welches Moundvilles Economy, David Anderson's Savannah River Chiefdoms, Charles Hudson's The Southeastern Indians,

  • Chester De Pratter's Late Prehistoric and Early Historic Chiefdoms in the Southeastern United, States for example, which people may want to buy. Any interested graduate student may take the course. Intensely interested undergrads should contact me by e-mail hwright@umich.edu.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    ANTHRCUL 760 / PSYCH 689. Culture and Cognition.

    Ethnology-Theory/Method

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Lawrence Hirschfeld (lhirsch@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology and permission of instructor. (2).

    Credits: (2).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/anthrcul/760/001.nsf

    This seminar is part of an interdisciplinary program initiated by the Departments of Anthropology and Psychology. The seminar includes both students and faculty. In it we will explore how the cultural environment influences, and is influenced by, reasoning and other psychological processes. The cognitive revolution has been based upon the tacit assumption that all humans have the same basic cognitive structures and functions, and that cultures and other social contexts contribute only peripherally important content differences. Anthropologists have long argued that both the content and function of knowledge may be strongly linked to the types of problems that a given culture or social group must habitually solve. The seminar will focus on ways in which cognition may be culturally mediated, socially situated, and contingent on historical forces. Recent research in the field will be presented and discussed.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    ANTHRCUL 777. Lingusitic Anthropology Laboratory.

    Linguistic Anthropology

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Anthropology Or A Related Discipline. (1-3). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ANTHRCUL 825 / HISTORY 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

    Ethnology-Regional Courses

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See History 825.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ANTHRCUL 957. Research Practicum in Anthropology.

    Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-8). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (2-8).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    ANTHRCUL 958. Anthropological Research.

    Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    ANTHRCUL 959. Survey of Literature on Selected Topics.

    Ethnology-Topical Courses

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    ANTHRCUL 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate Standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    ANTHRCUL 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate Standing; Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


    Undergraduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


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