College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Chemistry


This page was created at 4:31 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Chemistry
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for CHEM

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Chemistry.


CHEM 417 / PHYSICS 417. Dynamical Processes in Biophysics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jens-Christian D Meiners (meiners@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Math. 216, and Phys. 340 or Chem. 463. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Physics 417.001.

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CHEM 420. Intermediate Organic Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): William H. Pearson (wpearson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 215/216. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Chemistry 420 is an exploration of selected topics in organic chemistry. The course builds on the basic concepts of structure and reactivity considered in Chemistry 210 and 215. Emphasis will be on stereochemistry, the mechanisms of organic reactions, and to a lesser extent, organic synthesis. Pericyclic reactions and reactions involving the major types of reactive intermediates carbocations, carbanions, free radicals, and carbenes will be covered. It may serve as a terminal course on the topic or as a bridge between the first year of organic chemistry and further study in the area. Grading in the course will be based on three hour examinations and a final exam or a term paper (to be determined).

TEXT: Advanced Organic Chemistry:...Part A, Carey, ISBN 0306462435, Plenum Publishing.
The Art of Writing Reasonable Organic Reaction Mechanisms, Grossman, ISBN 0387985409, Springer Verlag.

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CHEM 447. Physical Methods of Analysis.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Larry Beck (lbeck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 260 and 241/242. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem447/

This course introduces the student to the principles and techniques of modern analytical chemistry. Atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, chromatographic separation techniques, and contemporary electroanalytical chemistry are stressed. The principles of data collection and the processing and representation of analytical signals are introduced.

TEXT: Principles of Instrumental Analysis, Skoog, ISBN 0030020786, Brooks/Cole.

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CHEM 452 / BIOLCHEM 452. Introduction to Biochemistry II.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Robert S. Fuller (bfuller@umich.edu) , Alex Ninfa (aninfa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 451. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the second in a two-term sequence designed for students who are concentrators in biochemistry. Emphasis is on developing the capacity of the students to think about complex biological processes in terms of the underlying chemistry. Initially nucleic acids and nucleotides are discussed. The biosynthesis of amino acids and their utilization in cellular metabolism, including protein synthesis, serves as a primer for an introduction to biochemical genetics and virology.

TEXT: Biochemistry (with supplement/solutions manual), Voet & Voet, ISBN 0471325821, Wiley.

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CHEM 461. Physical Chemistry I.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Henry C. Griffin (hcg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 260, Phys. 240 (or 260), and Math. 215. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the second of the three-term physical chemistry sequence Chemistry 260/461/463. Chemistry 461 builds on the introduction to quantum mechanics that was given in Chemistry 260. Students will use the Schrödinger Equation in 1-, 2-, and 3 dimensions to solve exactly a series of important chemical problems including the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotor, and the hydrogen atom. Group theory is introduced as an aid for understanding spectroscopic selection rules. Advanced spectroscopy, including transition probabilities, normal vibrational modes, and photoelectron spectroscopies are introduced and then used to deduce molecular structure. The valence-bond and molecular orbital theories of chemical bonding are discussed, and methods for performing quantum chemical calculations, including variational and perturbation methods, are introduced. The quantum mechanics of spin and angular momentum are discussed and used to interpret magnetic resonance spectra.

TEXT: Physical Chemistry, Atkins, 7th edition, ISBN 0716735393, W.H. Freeman.

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the Computational Chemistry Laboratory (Chemistry 462, 1 credit) in the same term that Chemistry 461 is taken.

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CHEM 462. Computational Chemistry Laboratory.

Instructor(s): Henry C. Griffin (hcg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Math. 215, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 461. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces modern computational tools for symbolic mathematics and for graphical display (Mathematica and Maple). Examples are given of the use of these tools for solving problems in quantum mechanics and quantum chemistry, including exploration of the functional forms of wave functions, solutions of simple differential equations, and diagonalization of Hamiltonians. Molecular modeling software (HyperChem and CAChe) is introduced and used to perform both ab initio and semi-empirical quantum chemical calculations. The examples used are taken largely from the topics discussed in Chemistry 461.

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the second term of Physical Chemistry (Chemistry 461, 3 credits) in the same term that Chemistry 462 is taken.

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CHEM 463. Physical Chemistry II.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): John Gland (gland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 461/462. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the third of the three-term physical chemistry sequence Chemistry 260/461/463 and builds on material presented in both previous courses. The rigorous mathematical theory of classical thermodynamics will be developed, including applications to entropy, heat engines, solution properties, and phase and chemical equilibria. Modern statistical thermodynamics will be introduced. Modern theories of fundamental reaction rates will be used built on the phenomenological kinetics introduced in Chemistry 260. Methods for determining and understanding solid state structures will be discussed, building on group theory introduced in Chemistry 461.

TEXT: Physical Chemistry, Levine, 5th edition, ISBN 0072534958, McGraw Hill.

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CHEM 463. Physical Chemistry II.

Section 200 (HONORS).

Instructor(s): David Lubman (dmlubman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 461/462. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the third of the three term physical chemistry sequence Chemistry 360/461/463 and builds on material presented in both previous courses. The rigorous mathematical theory of classical thermodynamics will be developed, including applications to entropy, heat engines, solution properties, and phase and chemical equilibria. Modern statistical thermodynamics will be introduced. Modern theories of fundamental reaction rates will be used build on the phenomenological kinetics introduced in Chemistry 360. Methods for determining and understanding solid state structures will be discussed, building on group theory introduced in Chemistry 461.

TEXT: Physical Chemistry, Laidler & Meissler, ISBN 0395918480, Houghton Mifflin.

Section 200. Honors. This section is designed to introduce students to a more thorough, research oriented view of Physical Chemistry. This is required for Honors Chemistry Concentrators.

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CHEM 521 / BIOPHYS 521. Biophysical Chemistry II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Erik R P Zuiderweg (zuiderwe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 461, Biol. Chem. 415, and Chem. 430 or equivalent; and permission of course director. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Biophysics 521.001.

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CHEM 526 / BIOLOGY 526. Chemical Biology II.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Vincent Pecoraro (vlpec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 525. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 402 or equivalent. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the second of a two course sequence in Chemical Biology. The intent of these courses is to introduce students to the breadth of material contained within the inherently interdisciplinary "Chemical Biology" arena. The course has been designed to cross the traditional disciplinary boundaries of Chemistry. Thus, rather than having traditional bioorganic, bioinorganic, and biophysical sections, the course will focus on case studies chosen so that over the course of the two term sequence, all of the key concepts in the traditional chemical disciplines are discussed.

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CHEM 528 / BIOLCHEM 528 / MEDCHEM 528. Biology and Chemistry of Protein Cofactors.

Section 001 Meets 1/7/02 to 2/21/02. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): Carol Fierke (fierke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/biolchem/528/001.nsf

This course will explore the roles of organic and organometallic cofactors in biology. Topics covered will be cofactor assembly, cofactors as sensors, and cofactors in enzyme chemistry, with an emphasis on modulation of cofactor reactivity by complexation with the protein. The lectures will be complemented by assigned reading material from the primary literature and will assume basic familiarity with bioorganic chemistry.

This course is aimed at introducing graduate students and advanced undergraduate students to this topic. Course requirements: Students will be asked to write a term paper on a particular enzyme or group of enzymes/cofactors that have not been extensively discussed in the lectures. In addition, there will be weekly problem sets that will be graded. The course will not have any formal examinations.The grade in this course will be determined based on the take-home problem sets and the term paper.

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CHEM 541. Advanced Organic Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Edwin Vedejs (edved@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 540. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Synthetic organic chemistry. The scope and limitations of the more important synthetic reactions are discussed within the framework of multistep organic synthesis.

TEXT: Advanced Organic Chemistry, part B, Carey & Sundberg, 4th edition, ISBN 0306462451, Kluwer.

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CHEM 542. Applications of Physical Methods to Organic Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Adam Matzger (matzger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 260, 241/242, and 312. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Applications of infrared, ultraviolet, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; optical rotary dispersion, mass spectrometry; and other physical methods to the study of the structure and reactions of organic compounds.

TEXT: Organic Structural Spectroscopy, Lambert, ISBN 0132586908, Prentice Hall.

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CHEM 570. Molecular Physical Chemistry.

Section 100 Meets with Chemistry 461.100.

Instructor(s): Henry C. Griffin (hcg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 461 and 463. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Chemistry 461.100.

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CHEM 575. Chemical Thermodynamics.

Section 100 Meets with Chemistry 463.100.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Chem. 461. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Chemistry 463.100.

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CHEM 580. Molecular Spectra and Structure.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): A. Ramamoorthy (ramamoor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 570. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Review of atomic spectra; rotational, vibration-rotation, and electronic spectra of diatomic and simple polyatomic molecules; and deduction of molecular parameters from spectra. Role of symmetry and representation theory generally. Different spectroscopies from nmr, and epr through ESCA.

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CHEM 597. Introduction to Graduate Research.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Dimitri N Coucouvanis (dcouc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U." May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~michchem/graduate/researchareas.html

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

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CHEM 598. Integrated Graduate Education and Research Training Program (IGERT) Research Rotation.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit four times.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mater/igert.html

In this program, we are seeking to bring together disciplines that are concerned with materials on a scale from the nanoscopic to the microscopic. These length scales for materials bridge the gap between the molecular (chemical) and the micron scale of devices. Chemists are increasingly concerned with complex "supramolecular" arrays, whereas the electronics engineers strive to decrease the sizes of their devices to molecular dimensions. The length scales associated with these disciplines are converging. Unfortunately, the language and laboratory skills that have evolved at the two extremes are quite different, making communication difficult. We envision a program that brings together these disciplines, creates a common language, and will produce a new generation of students skilled in molecularly designed materials. The course helps students establish "critical literacy" in areas outside their core expertise is our proposed research group rotation (RGR). In the RGR, a student will select 3 research mentors with whom three, short-term research projects will be carried out. Each project will include a definition of the problem, a literature search, some laboratory work, and a final written report The student must interview a minimum of 5 prospective research mentors before choosing the three RGR mentors. The RGR student will take part in the full life of the host research laboratory, including participating in all group meetings, seminar activities, etc. of the host laboratory/department. At least one of the three research rotations must be outside the students home department and may include a summer term at a participating industrial or government laboratory.

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CHEM 599. Chemistry Biology Interface (CBI) Training Program Research Rotation.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~michchem/chembio/

The Chemistry Biology Interface (CBI) Training Program, a unique multidisciplinary Ph.D. training program, focuses on the fundamental underlying chemical principles that govern all biological processes. This dynamic new program emphasizes mechanistic and synthetic aspects of research at the chemistry biology interface and leads to a Ph.D. degree in either Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, or Medicinal Chemistry. Students enrolled in the program will gain a broad appreciation of the chemical foundations of biology including synthesis, analysis, and theory and will be prepared to pursue research on a vast array of critical biological problems in academic or industrial settings. Three different University of Michigan departments Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, and Medicinal Chemistry have combined strengths to create this challenging new program. Each student's course of study is tailored to suit his or her individual goals and includes laboratory rotations in at least two of the participating University departments. To learn more about research in an industrial setting, students will also be encouraged to perform a rotation at the Parke-Davis Research Laboratories adjacent to the University's North Campus. The CBI Training Program offers students the unique opportunity to participate in laboratory rotations at the Parke-Davis Research Laboratories in the following areas:

  1. Medicinal chemistry
  2. Peptides
  3. Structure-based design chemistry
  4. Exploratory chemistry
  5. Computational chemistry
  6. Molecular modeling
  7. Bioorganic chemistry
  8. Structural biology
  9. Analytical research
  10. Combinatorial chemistry
  11. Automated chemical synthesis

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CHEM 603 / BIOPHYS 503. Biomolecular NMR: Structure & Dynamics in Solution & Solids.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Erik R P Zuiderweg (zuiderwe@umich.edu) , Ayyalusamy Ramamoorthy

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Biophysics 503.100.

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CHEM 616. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Mark Johnson (mjaj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 507 and 570. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The application of theoretical principles to the experimental observations of modern inorganic chemistry: ligand field and molecular orbital theory of complex ions, structural chemistry, magnetic properties, ESR, Mossbauer spectra, NQR.

TEXT: Structural Methods in Inorganic Chemistry, Ebsworth, ISBN 0849377323, CRC Press.

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CHEM 646. Separation Processes.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Richard D Sacks (rdsacks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 545 and Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Requirements for analytical and preparational separations. Pertinent phase rule considerations; theoretical plate concepts; efficiency calculations for multistage processes; nature of adsorption. Theory and practice of: (a) precipitation and crystallization; (b) volatilization and distillation; and (c) extraction, partition and distribution processes, especially ion-exchange, liquid-liquid extraction, and various types of adsorption and partition chromatography (gas, paper, thin-layer, etc.)

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CHEM 649. Electrical Methods in Analytical Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Mark E Meyerhoff (mmeyerho@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 447 and Graduate standing. (2-3).

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Fundamentals of modern electroanalytical methods including potentiometry, ion-selective electrodes, gas sensors, voltammetry, amperometry, conductimetry, chemically modified electrodes, pulsed voltammetric techniques, and biosensors. Instrumentation associated with these methods is also examined.

TEXT: Electrochemical Methods: Fundamentals..., Bard, ISBN 0471043729, Wiley.

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CHEM 711. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry.

Section 100 Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Chem. 507. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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CHEM 720. Chemical Sciences at the Interface of Education (CSIE) Seminar.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Brian P Coppola (bcoppola@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission if instructor. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~michchem/csie/

Special seminar designed to discuss effective teaching strategies and methods to assess teaching effectiveness. Supervised teaching experiences in conjunction with an accelerated entrance into the research laboratory enable CSIE students to gain experience in curriculum revision for undergraduate lecture and laboratory courses.

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CHEM 800. Seminar in Chemical Biology.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): E Neil G Marsh (nmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2). May be repeated for a total of 12 credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 801. Seminar in Analytical Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Larry W Beck (lbeck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 802. Seminar in Inorganic Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Omar Yaghi (oyaghi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 803. Seminar in Organic Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Edwin Vedejs (edved@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 804. Seminar in Physical Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): John L Gland (gland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 805. Materials Seminar.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Curtis

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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CHEM 806. Departmental Tuesday Seminar.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Masato Koreeda (koreeda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 807. Departmental Thursday Seminar.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Michael D Morris (mdmorris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 808. Departmental Friday Seminar.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): E Neil G Marsh (nmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 895. Research in Chemistry.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Approval of Graduate Committee. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~michchem/graduate/researchareas.html

Research, the core of Michigan's Ph.D. program, involves applying state-of-the-art experimental techniques and theoretical frameworks toward developing a complete understanding of the nature of chemical and biological systems. Although you will be immersed in your chosen area of concentration, you will be encouraged to pursue an interdisciplinary approach to research. As the questions chemists ask become more complex, our vision must focus beyond fundamental chemical sciences into the interface with other disciplines. Joint studies are offered in many areas such as medicinal chemistry, macromolecular science, chemical physics and biophysics. Research groups in the department are organized into several areas:

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. The development of cutting-edge techniques and their application to real-world analytical problems are the research domains of this group at Michigan. Faculty and student research focuses on immunoassay development; chemical sensors; high-speed chromatographic and electrophoretic separations; mass spectrometry; solid-state NMR, vibrational spectroscopy; and spectroscopic imaging. Faculty and students collaborate regularly with biomedical and industrial scientists to tackle difficult analytical challenges in fields ranging from clinical analysis and gene sequencing to chemical process control and environmental monitoring.

CHEMICAL BIOLOGY. Chemical Biology studies the fundamental chemical principles that govern all biological systems. The Chemistry Department at Michigan is home to an exciting multidisciplinary program at the interface between Chemistry and Biology. Synthesis, measurement, and theory of biological molecules (including proteins and nucleic acids) are important components of the program. Particular areas of expertise are Metallo-Biochemistry, Biological Catalysis, Biomolecular Structure & Function, Chemical Genetics & Bioorganic Chemistry, and Chemical Imaging & Sensors. Research in these areas often involves the synthesis of a particular ligand as a probe of biological function, or the use of chemical, biophysical, molecular biological, and genetic methods to modify and examine biomolecular structure and function. Michigan is one of a select group of universities nationwide funded by the National Institutes of Health specifically to train graduate students in this exciting and interfacial research area that spans the departments of Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, and Medicinal Chemistry. The Chemical Biology program at Michigan has pioneered the department wide research course system that provides first year students with the opportunity to work in two or three different laboratories before selecting a research mentor. For more information see: http://www.umich.edu/~chembio/

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Inorganic chemists at Michigan pursue a broad array of research topics primarily focused in the areas of bioinorganic and materials chemistry. Current research groups have interests in supramolecular, surface, solid state and polymer chemistry. Objectives include: the design and study of organic-based zeolites and superconductors; microelectronic device structure and reactivity; fire-resistant, liquid-crystalline, and pre-ceramic polymers; catalysts used for oxidation, desulfurization and polymerization of hydrocarbons; high-temperature superconductors; non-linear optical and magnetic materials. There is also a strong interest in bioinorganic chemistry, studies of metal catalyzed reactions in photosynthesis, in elucidating the chemical mechanism of nitrogenase, and in de novo metalloprotein design. Organometallic chemistry, as applied to the activation or recognition of small molecules, represents another area of interest and is often related to biochemical, materials or catalysis themes.

MATERIALS CHEMISTRY. Materials chemistry at Michigan combines well-grounded training in chemical sciences and experiences in the real world of materials. Novel paradigms for the synthesis of monomers for polymeric substances have been undertaken with a keen eye for their metal ligating properties. Whole classes of new substances with unusual thermal, mechanical, electrical and catalytic properties are currently under investigation. Fundamental investigations of the structure and bonding of adsorbed species on surfaces are providing promising leads on corrosion phenomena and new concepts and structures in the design of sensors. Theoretical and experimental studies in supramolecular architecture have led to the development of organic zeolites that have changed the traditional concepts regarding zeolites. Relationships between molecular structure and chemical reactivity are being exploited in designing highly reactive organometallic and metallo-organic precursors for the low temperature synthesis of magnetic, electronic, and structural ceramics. Michigan's program in Materials Chemistry was recently awarded an IGERT (Integrated Graduate Education and Research Training Program) grant from the National Science Foundation to help train the next generation of chemists with interest in materials. For more information see: http://www.umich.edu/~mater/igert.html

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Research in organic chemistry at Michigan is broad in scope yet rigorous in approach. Faculty interests include the development of new synthetic methods for the assembly of complex organic molecules in a stereocontrolled fashion; the synthesis of natural (and unnatural) products with unique biological properties and biomedical significance; the design and synthesis of molecular probes of biochemical function; and the preparation of polymers and other molecules of potential use in new materials applications. Organometallic chemistry using both transition metals and main group elements is an active area of research, spanning the range from synthetic methods development to the design of novel promoters of polymerization. A number of industrially sponsored fellowships in the area of organic chemistry are awarded each year to students in the program.

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. Research in physical chemistry at Michigan is aimed at developing a comprehensive and fundamental understanding of chemical phenomena, building on a solid foundation in quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, and chemical kinetics. Current faculty efforts involve the design and application of novel theoretical and experimental methods, from the use of EXAFS, EPR, and solid-state and solution NMR, to the development of theoretical and computational models; from the employment of ultra-high vacuum techniques to the application of microwave, X-ray, gamma-ray, and ultrafast laser spectroscopy. The ubiquitous nature of chemistry leads to exploration in a diverse range of areas, including the study of critical phenomena, non-linear systems, complexity theory, and the excitations and chemical processes that occur at surfaces, in nanostructures, in low-dimensional solids, in the atmosphere, in isolated small molecules and clusters, and in biological systems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CHEM 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CHEM 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for CHEM.


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