College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Comparative Literature


This page was created at 4:33 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Comparative Literature
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for COMPLIT

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Comparative Literature.


COMPLIT 430. Comparative Studies in Fiction.

Section 001 The Arab-Israeli Conflict in Middle Eastern Literature. Meets with AAPTIS 383.001.

Instructor(s): Carol Bardenstein (cbardens@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 383.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMPLIT 430. Comparative Studies in Fiction.

Section 002 Impressions of a Turkish Author. Meets with MENAS 490.001.

Instructor(s): Ahmet Husrev Altan

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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COMPLIT 601. Contemporary Theory.

Section 001 De-colonizing the Tongue.

Instructor(s): Christi Ann Merrill

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What does it mean to write in the language of the colonizer? This past century writers in both Africa and South Asia have in various ways identified with Raja Rao's self-professed struggle to "convey in a language that is not one's own the spirit that is one's own." Is it necessary to follow Ngugi wa Tiong'o's lead in rejecting English as a language of expression in order to decolonize one's mind? How does this strategy compare to G.N. Devy's proposal a continent away that a dose of bhasha literary traditions may be the antidote to cultural amnesia? We will consider a range of theoretical positionings, from mincing colonial mimic to defiant postcolonial nativist and everything in between, in order to understand the political significance of the specific (and much-debated) syntactical and lexical choices colonial and postcolonial writers have made as they write back to the "Centre."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMPLIT 698. Directed Reading in Comparative Literature.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMPLIT 721. Seminar in Translation.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anton Shammas (antons@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. (3). Can be taken up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Writing on the "task of the translator" some eighty years ago, Walter Benjamin posed the question: "Is translation meant for readers who do not understand the original?" Drawing on a variety of theoretical and literary texts, this seminar, while trying to understand Benjamin's question (and, hopefully, to answer it), will closely examine the elusive meaning of the act of translation, within the context of the emerging discipline of Translation Studies. Focusing on the twentieth century, we will start with Ezra Pound's theory of "luminous details," then grapple with Benjamin's argument that translation is meant to liberate the language imprisoned in the text through the recreation of that text, and end up discussing the ideas put recently forward by Lawrence Venuti, about translation being a totalizing, domesticating process, meant to restore or preserve the foreignness of the foreign text (though sometimes, as in the case of the French translation of the Arabian Nights, the translated text cannibalizes the original). In the meanwhile, we will examine the traceable, concealed, manipulated, and invented intertextual connections (and, obviously, disconnections), between source and target, the self and the Other, "rightful" Prospero and "savage" Caliban, against the complex politics of translation. This will be done with the help of or despite texts from different disciplines, ranging from the biblical parable on the "confusion of the tongues" (and Derrida's very confused reading of that parable), to the Borgesian "Library of Babel," in search of things lost and found in translation.

Besides a substantial, final research paper, students will be required to write three two-page essays, based on (or inspired by) the weekly readings. The essays will be shared with the group in advance (through e-mail), and then presented as a basis for in-class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMPLIT 751. Topics in Comparative Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James I Porter (jport@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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COMPLIT 761. Seminar in Literature and the Other Arts.

Section 001 Fin-de-Siècle Representations of Women.

Instructor(s): Joel D Howell (jhowell@umich.edu) , Paul N Edwards (pne@umich.edu) , Alina M Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Fin-de-siècle in Europe represents both the end of a century and a state of mind. In this course we will explore some of the characteristic features of this period of transition, by taking a close look at contemporary representations of women, and by women, as they appear in various cultural productions of the time. The guiding assumption in taking this approach is that these representations are symptomatic of the general spirit and dominant ideology of the period. More precisely, they can offer an insight into the social malaise of the industrial age, caught between futuristic dreams and regressive fantasies, refinement and violence. Moreover, the prevalence of hysterical and neurotic symptoms, commonly embodied by women, invite a symptomatic reading not just of contemporary cultural productions, but of medical and sociological discourses as well.

Readings will include literary texts by fin-de-siècle writers (Wilde, Huysmans, Rachilde, Ibsen), and by turn-of-the-century British and American women authors ("daughters of decadence," in Showalter's words), as well as works by symbolist and orientalist artists whose vision landscape. Theoretical texts will combine a selection of fin-de-siècle authors (e.g., Lombroso, Charcot, Freud and Breuer, Le Bon, Nordau, Nietzsche, Simmel), with modern historical and critical assessments (Jameson, Foucault, Gilman, Beizer, Showalter). Evaluation will be based on a final essay and a short oral expose. Students from other disciplines are welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMPLIT 771. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 Comparison and Hegemony.

Instructor(s): Tomoko Masuzawa (masuzawa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Here are some of the guiding questions of this working seminar:

  • What does it mean to compare?
  • Do various "comparative studies" such as comparative literature, comparative religions really compare? Or is "comparison" a codeword for theorizing?
  • What is the relation between comparative endeavors and theory?

Comparative studies are often suspected or accused of covertly fostering some Euro-hegemonic assumptions: comparative literature has privileged the European-generated literature as well as literature written in European languages; comparative religions has taken Protestant Christianity as the normative prototype for classifying and analyzing all religions. Are these Euro-hegemonic dispositions merely historical and accidental, therefore, possibly, correctable? Or are they structurally endemic to the comparative enterprise as such?

Does the emerging notion of the global embodied, for instance, in concepts and phrases such as "world literature," "world religions" manage to overcome, displace, or mask the hegemonic values hitherto prevalent?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Intructor

COMPLIT 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMPLIT 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


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