College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in English


This page was created at 4:49 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in English
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for English.


ENGLISH 401 / RELIGION 481. The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse.

Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm and a final. Class attendance and participation essential.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 430. The Rise of the Novel.

Section 001 First Century of the Novel's Development in Britain. Satisfies the pre-1830 course requirement.

Instructor(s): David L Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~ece

The success of the novel as a popular literary genre tends to obscure the fact that it is a fairly recent innovation. In this course we will survey the first century of the novel's development in Britain, reading path-breaking works by such writers as Haywood, Defoe, Richardson, Goldsmith, Radcliffe, and Austen. What distinguishes the novel, we will ask, from other literary forms, and why did this genre take hold when it did? What were the chief concerns, whether social, moral, or aesthetic, of novelists writing in the eighteenth century, and how did these evolve over the course of the period? Finally, how do the best-sellers of eighteenth-century fiction reflect and contribute to conditions of daily life and thought at the time? Course work is selected from a menu of innovative assignments including a dramatic performance, an oral presentation, close reading exercises, a final exam, and a collaborative, web-based research project to be included as part of the Eighteenth-Century England web site www.umich.edu/~ece.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine developments in English fiction from the turn of the century to the mid-1940s. We will explore the ways in which the twentieth-century novel, rather than being driven primarily by plot, attempts to trace, in Joyce's words, "the curve of an emotion" or to incorporate, as Lawrence desires, philosophy and fiction in the novel. Virginia Woolf tells us that "human nature changed" in the first decade of the 1900s. Certainly the way novelists constructed human nature altered dramatically. We will discuss issues that repeatedly manifest themselves in these novels: how do men and women in the twentieth century respond to or initiate the radical redefinitions of sex roles that characterize the modern period? How do the wars of the first half of the previous century shape and deform the novels written at that time? How does this body of fiction address (and fail to address) the volatile issues associated with race and class in the first half of the twentieth century? We will also pay close attention to the variety of ways each author positions her/himself in relation to a past: how does the modern stand in relation to history? Readings will include a substantial course pack and the following texts: Gertrude Stein, Three Lives; James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; D.H. Lawrence, Women in Love; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; and Ralph Ellison, The Invisible Man.

Course requirements are three essays (two five-page papers and a final, more substantial essay that's seven to nine pages long). There will be a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 434. The Contemporary Novel.

Section 001 Meets with English 549.001.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack (epollacl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This term, we will read a dozen American novels written within the past fifty years. Possible list of authors: (Gayl) Jones, (J.K.) Toole, DeLillo, Roth, Baker, (Marilynne) Robinson, Ford, O'Brien, Cunningham, Munro, Erdrich, (Rosellen) Brown, Tyler, and Ha-Jin. In addition to discussing the intellectual and emotional content of each book, we will take apart each novel and see how the writer has put it together. To this end, we will focus on questions of structure, voice, point of view, setting, control of information, tense, authorial intrusion, modes of discourse, authorial distance, gestures toward realism and flights into fantasy. We will pay special attention to ways in which these novels are problematic and develop possible criteria for reviewing contemporary fiction. Though this is slotted to be a large class, students will be encouraged to take active part in discussions. Each student will turn in two short papers and one longer essay.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 441. Contemporary Poetry.

Section 001 Contemporary Poetry.

Instructor(s): Richard L Hilles (rhilles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will provide you with an overview of the major aesthetic directions in American poetry since 1945 and introduce you to the various critical traditions devised to explain them. To this end, Contemporary American Poetry (7th Edition) will serve as the basis for studying the key poets of this period. We will also look at the full careers of three poets: Sylvia Plath, Stanley Kunitz, and Robert Hass (who will deliver the Hopwood Lecture in February). Also, we will look at two recent volumes by "newer poets," two books of criticism, and a coursepack of supplementary readings. Students will be required to give one presentation and write two research papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 450. Medieval Drama.

Section 001 Sex and Religion in Medieval Drama.

Instructor(s): Theresa L Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Medieval drama encompasses a wide range of texts, from extremely bawdy secular literature to serious devotional plays. Some texts explore the comedy of human sexual desire, others the grotesque possibilities of the sexualized body. As we read these plays, we will come better to appreciate how literature invents sexuality. Still other texts seek to teach Christian biblical history to the laity, beginning with Creation and ending with the Last Judgment. Although the Christian Bible obviously inspires such literature, the actors speak distinctly unbiblical words, at times uttering blasphemous scatological curses, at other times mocking ecclesiastical rituals. These plays will allow us to explore the connections between serious religious aspiration and carnivalesque laughter. Throughout this course, we will discover that European culture changes significantly between the twelfth century and the fifteenth, leading to fascinating changes in definitions of both sexuality and piety. Course requirements: active participation in discussions, reading response papers, peer critiques, and two short essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 461. English Romantic Literature.

Section 001 Satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Adela N Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will explore the diversity of writing poetry, fiction, autobiography, experimental prose of the Romantic period (1780-1830), with particular emphasis on the later part of the period. We will read Dorothy and William Wordsworth, both Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Shelley, Keats, Byron, Austen, Thomas De Quincey, and others. Topics will include: formulations of freedom, scandal and irony, gender and romanticism. Students will write one paper, one annotated bibliography which will allow them to do advanced research on a topic of their choosing, and one take-home final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 465 / MEMS 465. Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales.

Section 001 Satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Karla T Taylor (kttaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is an anthology of stories varying in style and genre, told by similarly diverse fictional narrators. Including both the stateliness of the Knight's Tale and the ribaldry of the Miller's Tale, it creates a new audience in English for a literature simultaneously playful and serious. We will read most of the Tales, paying attention to the work's qualities as an innovative story collection. Central questions will include: How does the Canterbury Tales address its audience? What is the purpose of its interpretative openness? What relations develop between literary style and social position? We will focus especially on narrative voices and the effects they create in their readers; audio tapes will help us hear these voices in Middle English. One or two short papers, one longer paper, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 470. Early American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Michele Simms-Burton (mlsimms@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover texts in American literature from the colonial period of the early seventeenth-century writings of John Smith to the 1830s. We will examine how "American" writers wrestle with certain concepts, for instance, the New World, being American, freedom, democracy, slavery, and the Indian, that all merge to construct a unique American personage. We will be reading works by John Smith, Mary Rowlandson, Anne Bradstreet, Crevecoeur, William Bradford, Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, and James Fenimore Cooper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 Class and Money in American Fiction.

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the interrelationships of class and money in some American fiction. These will range from the rags-to-riches success formula of Horatio Alger's Ragged Dick of the 1880s to Tom Wolfe's satire of the glitzy get-rich 1980s, Bonfire of the Vanities. In between we will read Henry James' The American, Jack London's Martin Eden, Theodore Dreiser's Sister Carrie, Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth, F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Sinclair Lewis' Babbitt, John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, and Philip Roth's Goodbye Columbus. Grades in the course will be based on two exams and frequent short writing assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 002 The Conquest of America.

Instructor(s): Michael Staub

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the literature of the early Americas. There will be units on Conquest and Contact, Captivity Narratives, and Capitalism and the Invention of Race. We will read literature produced by Europeans about their real or imagined encounters with the peoples of the Americas, as well as reports on Native peoples' responses to the Europeans. We will read the testimonies of Africans and African Americans about the Middle Passage and enslavement, as well as European-authored antislavery narratives and stories of cross-racial romance. We will also consider both literary and historical scholarship on the early histories of conquest and slavery, as well as analyze more recent cultural products including fiction and film reimagining this era. Assigned texts include: Aphra Behn, Oroonoko; Stephen Greenblatt, Marvelous Possessions; Jill Lepore, The Name of War; Caryl Phillips, Cambridge; and Giles Gunn, Early American Writing. Grades in the course will be based on active class participation, two exams, and short writing assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years. Meets with Russian 479.001

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 479.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 003 Dickens and Wilde.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Charles Dickens was the Shakespeare of Victorian Britain, a prolific creator of memorable characters and incidents, at once comic and tragic. He also reflects that notorious Victorian value earnestness. And Oscar Wilde is, well, the Wilde of Victorian Britain. In his writings and in his own life, he was so dazzling that even those who wished to hate him had to give up and laugh with him. But his life also took a classically tragic form after his public humiliation and imprisonment for homosexual offences. This double-author course showcases these two different literary stylists; it explores the historical differences between the early- and mid-Victorian moment of Dickens and the Late-Victorian, fin-de-siècle moment of Wilde; and it considers the critical uses to which these two authors are put today. I anticipate that we will discover the genuine complexity of Dickens' human vision and the surprising earnestness of Wilde's. Two papers; two examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 004 Toni Morrison as Novelist and Critic. Meets with CAAS 458.001. Satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Arlene Rosemary Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In an interview from the early 1980s, Toni Morrison states that "narrative remains the best way to learn anything. . .so I continue with narrative form." The aim of this course is to explore, in detail, Morrison's uses of narrative form and figurative language. We will read virtually all of Morrison's novels, examining the development of themes and formal strategies. We will also read Morrison's literary and cultural criticism, paying particular attention to the ways in which issues in the novels are addressed in these non-fiction works. Among the questions we will attempt to answer by reading the novels and criticism together is the question of how narrative might function as a form of theory. Other ongoing concerns of the class will be to situate Morrison's work in the African American and American literary traditions and to investigate the connections between her aesthetics and those evident in African American music.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 483. Great Works of Literature.

Section 001 Primo Levi and the Memory of Auschwitz. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Primo Levi was a Jew from Torino who survived a year in Auschwitz. His books, which deal recurrently with this experience, arguably constitute one of the major moral and stylistic projects of this century. In this course we will discuss five of them: Survival at Auschwitz, The Reawakening, The Monkey's Wrench, The Periodic Table, and The Drowned and The Saved. We will also read selections from his poems. We will examine in particular his understanding of the role of memory and remembering in constituting social experience, and observe the ways in which he confronts the problem of writing about the unspeakable. Coursework includes one 8 page essay and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 Rhetoric & the Achievement of Women's Rights.

Instructor(s): Alisse S Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL484w02/index.html

Most nineteenth-century American women had little or no access to political leaders, higher education, or even the wages they earned; they were not allowed to vote, sign contracts, or own property in the United States. Despite these rigid constraints and tremendous opposition, over a span of eight decades American women generated massive social and political changes. How? By using the only tool available to them: language. Clearly, what we say, how we say it, and to whom it is said can and does change the world. In this class, you'll learn to use rhetorical theory as a way to critically examine persuasive appeals while we study texts from the nineteenth-century woman's rights movement. Together, we will consider the power of language to define, reform, and even revolutionize politics and society. Work for the course includes class participation, quizzes, and two exams. For waitlist and attendance policies, visit the course website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 486. History of Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Richard Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introductory survey of literary theory from the romantics to the present, but with emphasis on the exciting and absolutely fundamental changes that have taken place in the past twenty-five years. Major areas of study will include Romanticism, Modernism, New Criticism, Post-structuralism, New Historicism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism. We will be using various kinds of literary theory to help us answer basic questions about what and why we read, questions like: What gives us literary pleasure? Do authors determine the meaning of their texts, or do readers? How is literature related to society and politics? Can pornography be literature? Is there a difference between literature and propaganda? How are male readers/writers different from female readers/writers? On what principles was our literary canon established, and should it be revised? Mix of lecture/discussion, but with a strong emphasis on student participation. Two, possibly three short papers, and a final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 489 / EDUC 440. Teaching of English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charlotte C Ratzlaff

Prerequisites: See School of Education Bulletin. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An examination of the practical problems of the classroom designed for prospective teachers of English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 496. Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: English 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 496. Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: English 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 503. Middle English.

Section 001 Meets with English 408.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This term we will examine, (often with the aid of parallel translations), works in early Middle English, as well as the better known and more frequently studied major authors Chaucer, Gower, Piers, the Pearl poet. Readings will include selections from prose and poetic histories, mystical writers, and contemporary social and political documents (laws, recipes, medical texts, chronicales, charters). We will examine a wide range of early Middle English texts as we develop an appreciation for the roles written English played in medieval England and the cultural and political consequences of the ability to read and write. The course requirements include regular in-class participation, frequent quizzes, two hour exams, and a short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 509. Language and Literature.

Section 001 English Prosody.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Any course in the structure of English. Graduate standing. (3).

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the far-reaching effects of rhythmic form in Modern English poetry and its enabling contexts biological, psychological, social, historical, and aesthetic. The hypothesis we will explore is this: As the common denominator of all evolutionary processes, rhythmic form is the ultimate metaphysical and humanistic ground. Our species-specific abilities with rhythm lie at the foundations of our sensibility, sociality, and communicative competence, and therefore at the foundations of language, culture, and mind. Rhythmic form provides an essential link between different minds, mental abilities, cultures, historical periods, arts, linguistic structures, and aesthetic uses of those structures. Rhythmic form gives language its ordered complexity and poetic expression, its mysterious power to wield that order and complexity for expressive purposes.

Throughout the course, we will balance this concern for theory and context with an equal concern for close rhythmic analysis and practical criticism. We will survey the best new work on linguistic prosody, versification, and poetic stylistics. We will scan the various components of poetic rhythm (meter, grouping, prolongation, etc.), both individually and in interaction. And we will explore how the defining qualities of these rhythmic forms give shape and order to the many other aspects of poetry sound, intonation, syntax, meaning, trope, etc.

Many course materials will come from several books that I am writing on these issues. Readings will be taken from recent work in evolutionary biology and cognitive science, the psychology of rhythm, literary theory, linguistic theory, poetics, and verisification. The major requirements will be a research paper on some concern related to the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 545. Literature of the Later Eighteenth Century.

Section 001 Early British Fiction.

Instructor(s): David Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/english/545/001.nsf

The emergence of the novel as a popular form, one often hears, was the most important development in the literary history of eighteenth-century Britain. One can readily account for such a claim, in part, as the retrospective bias of subsequent generations of readers who have continued to show an overwhelming preference for narrative prose fiction over, say, the Horatian ode; it is a far more complex and rewarding exercise to attempt to evaluate it in terms of the cultural history of the period itself. This course will survey major fictional works by such writers as Behn, Haywood, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Lennox, Burnley, and Lewis, with an emphasis on how they arose from, and how, ultimately, they began to transform the various social contexts of which they formed so integral a part. We will spend considerable time on the question of "the novel" as a genre, political and philosophical backgrounds, issues of travel and "otherness", gender and sexuality, and the interplay of moral and aesthetic constructions. Selections from recent scholarship on romance and the novel will provide a critical subplot running through the term, as well as a variety of theoretical frameworks with which to experiment in the course of our own conversations. Course requirements include active participation, oral presentations, a short essay, and a longer paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 546. Literature of the Romantic Period.

Section 001 New Romanticisms.

Instructor(s): Andrea Henderson (akhender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course has two principal aims. The first is to introduce students to selected canonical poems of the Romantic period, poems such as "Tintern Abbey," Prometheus Unbound, and the odes of Keats. The second is to read some of the non-canonical writing of the period, along with the critical work that has recently brought it into prominence. Thus, we will read poems by Charlotte Smith and Mary Robinson, a domestic novel by Maria Edgeworth, and a play by Joanna Baillie. At the same time, by broadening our historical sense of the period we should find fresh ways of understanding even the most canonical of Romantic works: we will see, for instance, that the characteristic style of Keat's odes was influenced by the gardenesque, and that Percy Shelley's concern with translucency reflects not only his idealism but also contemporary trends in costume and interior design. Course requirements will include one long paper and a class presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 549. Contemporary Literature.

Section 001 The Contemporary Novel. Meets with English 434.001.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack (epollacl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This term, we will read a dozen American novels written within the past fifty years. Possible list of authors: (Gayl) Jones, (J.K.) Toole, DeLillo, Roth, Baker, (Marilynne) Robinson, Ford, O'Brien, Cunningham, Munro, Erdrich, (Rosellen) Brown, Tyler, Ha-Jin. In addition to discussing the intellectual and emotional content of each book, we will take apart each novel and see how the writer has put it together. To this end, we will focus on questions of structure, voice, point of view, setting, control of information, tense, authorial intrusion, modes of discourse, authorial distance, gestures towards realism, and flights into fantasy. We will pay special attention to ways in which these novels are problematic and develop possible criteria for reviewing contemporary fiction. Though this is slotted to be a large class, students will be encouraged to take active part in discussions. Each student will turn in two short papers and one longer essay.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 549. Contemporary Literature.

Section 002 Oral and Written Traditions.

Instructor(s): Ted Chamberlin

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the relationships between oral and written traditions, including the continuities and discontinuities between spoken and written forms of language as they develop in different societies, and at different periods (for example, in the medieval, renaissance, 18th century, modernist, and contemporary periods within the English literary tradition); the performative qualities of narrative, lyric, and dramatic modes in both oral and written traditions; theories of orality and literacy, with special attention to some of the differences between Aboriginal, African, Asian, and European theories, and to perspectives provided in disciplines such as anthropology, history, philosophy, law, religious studies, and cognitive psychology; the influence of spoken and written language on literary forms and styles, and on notions of naturalness and artifice; modes of production and reception; the interpretative and evaluative dynamics of reading and listening; the development of literatures in English in colonial and postcolonial societies, and the ways in which the extensive use of dialect in literature has (for a very long time, in fact) been part of the transformation of linguistic and literary standards, the development of new regional and national identities, and a heightened consciousness of race, gender, and class. Texts will be chosen from a range of periods and genres. Particular attention will be paid to the development of theoretical approaches and practical strategies for teaching literature. Each student will be expected to give two or three seminar presentations (depending on class size) during the term, and an essay (about 6,000 words) will be due at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 553. Twentieth Century American Literature.

Section 001 Jewish Literatures in America.

Instructor(s): Anita Norich (norich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Reading fiction, poetry, and criticism, this course will examine some of the ways in which ethnic literature is produced and consumed in America. We will seek to expand what we mean by American literature by including perspectives, histories, and even languages not generally admitted into the discussion. What happens to our sense of American culture when we consider not only English, but also works written in immigrant or politicized languages (in this case, primarily Yiddish, but also Hebrew and Ladino)? Among our thematic concerns will be the contested cultural status of Israel, the Holocaust, American civil religion, and Jewish ritual and tradition. All works will be read in English; there are no language requirements for engaging these texts. We will read some well-known authors (Henry Roth, Anzia Yezierska, Delmore Schwartz, I. B. Singer, Saul Bellow, Cynthia Ozick, Grace Paley, Phillip Roth, Bernard Malamud), some unfamiliar ones (Yankev Glatshteyn, Moyshe Leyb Halpern, Anna Margolin, H. Leivick), and some others to be decided when we meet as a group. Requirements include an oral presentation, an end-of-term paper, and, of course, engagement in class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 572. Workshop in Writing Fiction.

Section 001 FICTION WORKSHOP

Instructor(s): Reginald McKnight (regmck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only. English 571. (6).

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 575. Workshop in Writing Poetry.

Section 001 Poetry Workshop.

Instructor(s): Richard W Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; English 574. (6).

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A gathering of poets with the purpose of providing frank but supportive readings of each other's work. Workshop: a place to work on your poems. Careful reading, rewriting and revision will be a focal point. We will try to learn how to appreciate and evaluate a diverse variety of poetries poetries represented by the work of members of the class as well as by poems brought to class by the instructor and students. We will try to take a practical rather than theoretical approach to poetry in this workshop.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 579. Creative Writing-Poetry.

Section 001 Rhyme & Time: A User's Guide to Prosody. Meets with English 429.001

Instructor(s): Richard W Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 614. Editing and the Creation of Texts.

Section 001 Constructing Literature: Editorial Theory and Cultural Transmission.

Instructor(s): George J Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course aims to demystify material texts by revealing them as not transparent and unproblematic but rather highly constructed and contingent. The texts we study and teach never come to us unmediated, but are always the product of individual and social forces. Our approach will be to focus on the ongoing revolution in textual scholarship since the 1980s and its expanding consequences for both editing and interpretation. We will examine both theoretical positions and their practical applications for the construction of texts, and will explore particularly the relation between contemporary textual theory on the one hand and contemporary literary theory and interpretation on the other. The course will be in two parts, as follows:

PART ONE will track current issues in textual theory from W.W. Greg's classic "The Rationale of Coyp Text" to Jerome McGann's recent response "The Rationale of Hypertext." Major issues will include whether there is a "the" text, the implications of multiple versions of literary works, the semantic importance of material features of the text, and the growing importance of electronic media. Along the way, we will illustrate our discussion with diverse examples from the work of William Shakespeare, John Keats, Marianne Moore, W.B. Yeats, W.E.B. DuBois, and Alain Locke's New Negro anthology among others.

PART TWO will involve a series of case studies of editorial theory and practice. Our most extended examples will probably involve Shakespeare's King Lear, Joyce's Ulysses, Dickinson's fascicles, and Yeats' poems. The same palimpsistic principles seem to apply to all kinds of works modern, ancient, "canonical", minority, colonial/post-colonial, even visual or auditory and students will be encouraged to contribute examples from works that particularly interest them and to explore ways in which the methods of this course can enrich their ongoing projects and concerns.

Besides attendance and participation in class discussions, course work will consist of a short group exercise in practical editing, a short oral presentation, and a research paper applying editorial theory and practice in a critical or interpretive study of a literary work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 626. Marxism and Literature.

Section 001 Black Marxism: African American Writers from the 1930s to the 1960s. Meets with American Culture 699.002.

Instructor(s): Alan M Wald (awald@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a weekly seminar sponsored by the English Department and Program in American Culture that will explore the art and politics of the African American Literary Left in the mid-twentieth century. The category of "Black Marxism" will be derived from writings by scholars such as Robin Kelley and Cedric Robinson, as well as from the careers of Paul Robeson and C.L.R. James. The term refers to the diverse appropriations of socialist thought developed by activists and theorists in liberation movements of the African Diaspora.

Writings to be explored are likely to include fiction, poetry, drama, and literary criticism by Langston Hughes, Ann Petry, Lorraine Hansberry, Richard Wright, Chester Himes, Alice Childress, and John Oliver Killens. We also may examine some primary documents such as left-wing African American magazines of the period (New Challenge, Negro Quarterly, Harlem Quarterly) and perhaps unpublished manuscripts and letters. Requirements include full participation in the seminar, two papers, and oral presentations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 648. Topics in the Modern Period.

Section 001 The Discovery of Homosexuality 1880-1930.

Instructor(s): Martha J Vicinus (vicinus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will concentrate on an exceptionally rich transitional period during which elaborate taxonomies of sexual behaviors were created and institutionalized. It would be easy to create a "coming out" trajectory, in which the invisible Victorian spinster or bachelor came to be defined as the homosexual subject. I hope that our study will develop a more complex and interesting narrative, examining both literary and scientific texts. By looking at both Victorian and Modern authors, we may find unexpected continuities and different breaks in the usual chronology of literary change. We will read some of the pioneering pre-Freudian sexologists, such as Richard von Krafft-Ebing, Havelock Ellis, August Forel, and Edward Carpenter. In addition we will explore such Decadent writers as Oscar Wilde, Vernon Lee, Michael Field (Katharine Bradley and Edith Cooper), and the black and white artist, Aubrey Beardsley. We will then turn to some key early Modernist texts by Henry James, Katherine Mansfield, D.H. Lawrence, and E.M. Forester, concluding with the (in)famous Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall.

Course requirements will include an annotated bibliography, short essay, and a final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 675. Creative Writing Project.

Section 001 Thesis (Fiction)

Instructor(s): Peter Ho Davies (phdavies@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; English 671 or 674. (6).

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 675. Creative Writing Project.

Section 002 Thesis (Poetry)

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: MFA students only; English 671 or 674. (6).

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 799. Departmental Colloquium.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 841. Seminar: An Historical Period.

Section 001 Cosmopolitanism, Race, and Identity in Black Literature of the 19th Century.

Instructor(s): Ifeoma C Nwankwo (icn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

(Ex)slave narrator Olaudah Equiano's constant travel between the U.S. and the Caribbean, the weekly cataloging of the movement of ships between U.S. and Caribbean sites in newspapers such as the South Carolina Gazette and W.E.B. DuBois' detailed descriptions of the smuggling of slaves from Africa through the Caribbean to the U.S. in his Ph.D. dissertation on the (failed) Suppression of the African Slave Trade remind us of the extent to which transnational movement was the norm in the Americas during slavery. Along with these goods and people moved ideas, including modes of self-definition, notions of relationality, conceptions of race and nation, and the prioritization of these elements in the construction of identity.

This course will center on the ways in which race in general, and Blackness in particular, were imagined, valued, and defined by people of African descent in the U.S., Haiti, Cuba, and the British West Indies during the nineteenth century. In order to facilitate our analysis we will consider several means of interpreting and theorizing the relationship between the desire for transnational, transregional, translinguistic engagement and the drive toward national, regional, or linguistic orientations in Black America's thought. Our approach will be specific, as well as comparative and integrative. That is to say, we will read texts as arising out of specific national contexts and circumstances, as well as in comparison with other texts, and through the interactions between people in different sites that are represented within them or that were pivotal to their creation.

In addition to undertaking close readings of texts produced during the century, we will explore the usefulness of contemporary theoretical frameworks for our analysis, including theories of hybridity, transculturation, cosmopolitanism, orientalism, pan-Africanism, and pan-Americanism. Course requirements include regular attendance, research paper, and presentations.

Probable readings include all or part(s) of:

  • Simon Bolivar, Letter from Jamaica
  • Carole Boyce Davies, Black Women, Writing, and Identity
  • Martin Robison Delany, Blake;or the Huts of America
  • Frederick Douglass, Documents relating to tenure as U.S. Consul to Haiti - The Heroic Slave
  • Paul Gilroy, The Black Atlantic
  • Juan Francisco Manzano, The Autobiography of a Cuban Slave -Poems of a Slave
  • Mary Prince, The History of Mary Prince, A West Indian Slave
  • Mary Louise Pratt, Imperial Eyes
  • Bruce Posnock, Color and Culture
  • Bruce Robbins, "Comparative Cosmopolitanism"
  • Edward Said, Orientalism
  • Jose David Saldivar, The Dialectics of our America

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 842. Seminar: An Historical Period.

Section 001 Masochism and Victorian Fiction.

Instructor(s): John Richard Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Victorian culture was rife with masochistic excess, from the spectacularly self-martyring heroines of dramatic convention to the more mundane but relentless emphasis on self-denial that dominates the period's moral values. Christopher Herbert, in Culture and Anomie, has gone so far as to speak of "a fundamentally masochistic cultural and political unconscious" in Victorian England. This will be a course on the cultural and political dimensions of masochism, particularly as they were represented in Victorian fiction. We will begin with a variety of conceptual frameworks within which psychoanalysis, relational theory, Foucauldian approaches, feminist and queer theory, as well as the work of contemporary performance artists. We will then try to situate a number of mid- and late-Victorian works in these various contexts. Readings will most likely include: essays by Freud, Laplanche and Pontalis, Kaja Silverman, Armando Favazza, Jack and Kerry Kelly Novick, Bob Flanagan, Susie Bright, Fakir Musafar, Lynda Hart, Leo Bersani, Anne McClintock; Gilles Deleuze's Coldness and Cruelty, and John Noye's The Mastery of Submission; and the following novels: Wuthering Heights, Alton Locke, Daniel Deronda, She, The Story of an African Farm, The Ebb Tide, and Picture of Dorian Gray. Requirements include regular attendance, and a long seminar paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 862. Seminar: Authors.

Section 001 Milton.

Instructor(s): Michael C Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to read closely the poetry and prose of John Milton amid the various intellectual and social currents of the seventeenth century, through the lenses made available by the various major theoretical schools of the late twentieth century. Milton is a figure with whom almost every subsequent generation of English writers has had to deal, for better and worse, and his reputation has fallen and risen as political, social, and aesthetic ideals have changed. Milton's impassioned efforts to address the ills of his day entailed contradictions that are still very much with us: he was a political revolutionary who was willing to endorse authoritarian methods to accomplish liberal goals; he was a devout believer in meritocracy who rarely felt this belief threatened an inherited if incorrigible misogyny; he was the epic narrator of the War in Heaven who felt that military valor had nothing to do with true virtue. Milton also wrote some of the most sublime poetry available in English about the joys of the natural world, and the deeply embodied pleasures of eating and sex, and about human relationships. We will be particularly interested in how Milton's political career reverberates throughout the poetry the ways, for example, that his experience as a defender of regicide may have influenced his portrait of Satan's rebellion against a resolutely monarchical God, and the ways that political defeat produced a radically inward reorientation of his ardent political aspirations. We will also explore Milton's frequent recourse to myths describing the origins of social and sexual difference, and map his felicitously mixed success at synchronizing these two kinds of difference.

As is appropriate for such an engaged and engaging writer, attendance and participation are required. There will also be frequent in-class reports, a shorter paper, and a longer research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 881. Seminar: Comparative or Interdisciplinary Study.

Section 001 Women Writers & British Aestheticism. Meets with Women's Studies 801.002.

Instructor(s): Johanna H Prins (yprins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar we will consider the place of women writers in British aestheticism, as a literary and artistic movement ranging broadly from the second half of the nineteenth century into the early twentieth century. Alongside the circulation of New Woman novels in the 1890s, there was a network of female aesthetes in England at the turn of the century whose writing has received renewed critical attention in recent years. Concentrating in particular on the relation between poetry, music, and the visual arts, we will analyze how these female aesthetes deployed the "sister arts", in poems inspired by paintings, in essays about music and art, in musical settings of poetry, and so on. We will read poetry and aesthetic prose by British women writers such as Christina Rossetti, Amy Levy, Alice Meynell, Mary Coleridge, Graham R. Tomson (Rosamund Marriott Watson), Michael Field (Katharine Bradley and Edith Cooper), A. Mary F. Robinson, Ethel Smyth, Vernon Lee (Violet Paget), and Virginia Woolf, in relation to each other and in response to male aesthetes such as John Ruskin, Walter Pater, and Oscar Wilde. We will consider the sexual politics of British aestheticism, and ask how feminist aestheticism complicates our understanding of literary culture in late Victorian England. Throughout the term, we will also take stock of current work on "forgotten" female aesthetes and think about alternative literary histories of aestheticism, and ask how feminist aestheticism complicates our understanding of literary culture in late Victorian England. Course requirements will include regular attendance and active participation, an oral presentation, and a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 992. Directed Study for Doctoral Students/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Must have a Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/grad/pedagogical.htm

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Winter Academic Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


Undergraduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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