College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in French


This page was created at 4:35 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in French
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for FRENCH

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for French.


FRENCH 402 / CAAS 433. Francophone Literature in Translation.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 001 African Drama.

Instructor(s): Mbala Nkanga (mbalank@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: A literature course or any course dealing with the Black experience in Africa or the Americas. Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). Only one literature in translation course may be considered for the concentration requirements.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Since the advent of the "Concours Théâtral Interafricain" in 1968, Francophone drama in Africa has evolved into one of the most important literary and artistic forms emanating from Africa. Playwrights such as Guy Menga, Guillaume Oyono-Mbia, Bernard Dadié, Abdou Anta Kâ, Seydou Badian Kouyate, Tchikaya U'Tamsi, Sony Labou Tansi, and Diur N'tumb, have demonstrated their mastery of the use of the French language while depicting African ways of life. In many instances the writers translated the poetics of African orature into French. In others they blended elements of history and fiction in order to analyze social, political crises in today's Africa for the delight of the readers and the anger of political brokers. Some of the writers such as Sony Labou Tansi have endeavored to craft new words and concepts, as well as invented powerful images, to express their Africanity within the Francophone universe, and their frustrations in front of social and political decay in many African nations. Through reading of plays and critical materials, viewing contextual videos, discussions, the course will consider the African individual and his/her society as depicted in some of the dramatic writings. In so doing, it intends to explore the writing patterns of some of the most read and performed Francophone African playwrights. It will include the issues of translation, which becomes an extension of Senghor's "metissage culturel" as it involves at different stages both writing and translating into two non-native languages. The focus of the course will be on Sony Labou Tansi, Guillaume Oyono-Mbia, Bernard Dadié, and Diur N'tumb.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 414. Advanced Business French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 French for Management. Meets with Business Administration 415.001 and 415.451.

Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: French 380. A maximum of six credits of French 380, 414, and Business Administration 415 may be counted toward a degree. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The emphasis is on:

  • a general view of economic development in contemporary France;
  • a detailed analysis of the functioning of economic and commercial practices;
  • the study of communication within the business community.

Case history method.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 450. Special Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 Filming a Nation: French Cinema and the Iconography of Nationhood.

Instructor(s): Rebecca L Graves (rlgraves@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From the moment the Lumière Brothers began to film quotidian events in 1896 nineteenth century, the cinema in France has played a significant role in the construction/diffusion of a national iconography. This course will investigate a variety of film genres (historical films, documentaries, society dramas, war films, and serial films) as well as important cinematic movements (poetic realism, cinema vérité, and the New Wave) as a means of illuminating how cinema participated in the constant re-visioning of French national identity in the 20th-century. We also will read a selection of short texts (some literary, some theoretical) pertaining to both the idea of the nation and to cinema.

Students will be required to attend film screenings Monday evenings from 7pm to 9pm. Some films will not be available for individual viewing, therefore it is imperative that students are free to attend scheduled weekly screenings. Coursework will include bi-weekly reaction papers, an oral presentation, a 3-4 page sequence analysis due at the mid-point of the academic term, and a final paper of 8-10 pages.

List of possible directors: Frères Lumières, Méliès, Gance, Dreyer, Clair, Renoir, Feuillade, Kirsanov, Dulac, Carné, Vigo, Vautier, Tati, Franju, Marker, Rouch, Resnais,Varda, Godard, Truffaut, Kassovitz.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 601. Proseminar in French.

Section 001 Readigs in Old French

Instructor(s): Peggy S McCracken (peggymcc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers instruction in the reading of Old French. Balance between grammatical introduction/review and reading practice to be determined according to interests and needs of students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 653. Studies in 17th Century French Literature.

Section 001 Changing Public Opinion.

Instructor(s): Katherine Almquist

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will examine the construction of public opinion throughout seventeenth-century France. We will begin with early seventeenth-century libertines who are among the first to speak of 'l'opinion publique' as something needing to be considered. We will then examine how Richelieu and Mazarin managed 'public opinion' for reasons of state. We will end the course by examining how conventionalism becomes determinate for the arts in the early reign of Louis XIV. While this course will focus primarily on the political theater of Corneille, the polemical literature of Pascal and the comedy of manners of Molière, we will also read selections from polemicists and propagandists such as La Mothe Le Vayer, Naudé, Guez de Balzac and the Cardinal de Retz.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 855. Special Topics Seminar.

Section 001 Seminar in Comparative Critical Theory and Literature in Francophone Studies.

Instructor(s): Frieda Ekotto (ekotto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The seminar is meant to provide students with an orientation to critical theory within Francophone studies. The following problematics will be covered:

  • 1) Analysis of concepts of race, racism, ethnicity, gender and class. Close reading of Negritude thinkers (Frobenius, Cesaire, Senghor, Memmi, Fanon, etc.)
  • 2) Among the generation of writers of the 1950s and 1960s who wrote against colonization, the return to Africa, temporary or permanent, real or imagined, became one of the most determinant elements in the construction of "African" identity among Blacks of the Diaspora. And yet, very often, in their work, the return to Africa ends in failure. Since the 1990s the perception and role of literature in the African diaspora has changed dramatically.
  • A new generation of African and Caribbean writers has appeared, with new concerns. We will concentrate on the complex issues relating to race, racism, ethnicity, gender in the work of this new generation, and examine how their work constructs collective and individual identities of the "Black subject." This seminar also is designed to validate the labor of thought. Thus the readings will serve both as examples and stimulants, and at the end of the day it will be my concern to convince seminar participants that enjoying this labor and sharing it with others ought to figure among the chief aims of professionalization in the field of Francophone Studies.

    Ability to read French is an advantage but not a necessity.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    FRENCH 899. Independent Study.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    FRENCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    FRENCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


    Undergraduate Course Listings for FRENCH.


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    This page was created at 4:35 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.


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