College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in German


This page was created at 4:35 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in German
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for GERMAN

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for German.


GERMAN 415. The German Language Past and Present.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julio Sanchez Hernandez

Prerequisites: One year beyond German 232. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The objectives of this course are to introduce students to the assumptions, terminology, and methods of descriptive linguistics, historical linguistics, and sociolinguistics and to apply these to a survey of the German language in both its current and past states. We will be concerned with the internal structure of the language; however, we will relate the internal structure to the cultural and social contexts in which the language has evolved and in which it is currently used.

We will pay attention to the differences between spoken and written varieties of German as well as the relationships between standard German and the many German dialects and regional standards. The class is oriented around group discussion, lectures, and presentations.

Requirements include brief homework assignments and short essays, a midterm, a final term paper and an oral presentation of the final paper. Readings will be in German and English. No previous knowledge of linguistics is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karl-Georg Federhofer (kallimz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: German 325/326. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

German 426 is devoted to enhance the writing, reading, and listening skills of advanced students of German. We will use various approaches to improve your proficiency. You are expected to read and prepare current short newspaper articles, stories, interviews, essays, etc. This textual material serves as a foundation for compositions and discussions. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages.

All class members are expected to give one brief presentation, and lead the subsequent discussion. The final grade is based on the compositions, class presentation, and participation. German will be used exclusively in this course.

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GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: German 325/326. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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GERMAN 430 / BA 499. Doing Business in German.

Section 001 Meets with German 430.451

Instructor(s): Janet K Van Valkenburg

Prerequisites: German 350, or one 300-level courses beyond German 232. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goals of German 430 are to increase the level of proficiency in all four areas of German (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) while expanding and expounding on particular topics and areas of interest in the German business world. In addition to becoming more competent in appropriate interactive forms and practices of the German business world, such as forms of communication, organization, and negotiation, students will also delve into such other aspects of German business as business technology, product fairs, partnership in the EU, trade, raw materials and protection of the environment, agriculture, marketing and advertisement, competition, and some very German concepts such as "Mitbestimmung" and "Berufslehre."

This course further develops the student's competence to function both knowledgeably and culturally correct in a German business setting. The materials used in the course consist of a course pack, German business texts from major German professional journals and newspapers, German business reports, and videotapes. Short papers and one term research paper will be required, as well as oral reports on findings of the papers and on other topics of interest. The course is conversation-oriented, and will be conducted in German.

This term, German 430 will also include a two-week unit on producing Power Point business presentations. This unit will be offered through the computer lab in the LRC.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 430 / BA 499. Doing Business in German.

Section 451 Meets with German 430.001

Instructor(s): Janet K Van Valkenburg

Prerequisites: German 350, or one 300-level courses beyond German 232. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 430.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 457. Twentieth Century German Fiction.

Section 001 Taboos:The Forbidden in 19th and 20th-Century German Literature. Meets with German 385.001.

Instructor(s): Kader Konuk

Prerequisites: One year beyond German 232. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/german/457/001.nsf

What are society's dos and don'ts? What constitutes socially and politically acceptable behavior? What can taboos tell us about the transformation of German society?

This course examines the way in which nineteenth- and twentieth-century German literature deals with taboos that disrupt or reinforce the social, political and moral order. We look at literary manifestations of, for example, the anarchist, 'Emanze', homosexual, collaborator, whore, cannibal, 'bastard', divorcee, at the suicidal, the incestuous and polygamous. The course includes short texts and excerpts from works such as Grimm fairy tales, Hoffmann's Struwwelpeter , Wedekind's Frühlings Erwachen , Freud's Totem und Tabu , Kafka's Die Verwandlung , Schnitzler's Leutnant Gustl , Frisch's Andorra and Christa Wolf's Der geteilte Himmel. The syllabus also looks at German rock, hiphop and rap, and covers films such as Tod in Venedig, Effi Briest, Angst essen Seele auf, Freak Orlando , and Shoah. Taught in German, the course is designed to improve intermediate-level written and spoken German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 492. German Honors Proseminar.

Instructor(s): Amrine

Prerequisites: Senior Honors standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

German 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, German 491. In German 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 493 / SOC 493. The Politics of Fascism and Right-Wing Movements.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 Meets with Political Science 489.002.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will analyze a very particular form of political participation, namely the social and historical aspects of fascism and right-wing movements. What is fascism? When does it arise? Who are its supporters? Who are its beneficiaries? What is its relationship to established political institutions? Above all, what is its relationship to that ubiquitous and fascinating social process known as "modernization"? Was it a unique phenomenon "in its own time and place" (i.e., the Europe of the 1920s and 1930s) or does it continue to exist albeit bearing different names and altered disguises?

The course is divided into two sections. The first section will illuminate certain key aspects of fascism and right-wing movements in a general comparative framework. The emphasis will be on concepts and analyses rather than descriptions and events per se. Still, this section of the course will be deeply anchored in history and empirical reality. We will mainly, though not exclusively, use Germany as our empirical case during this first segment of the course.

The second section will concentrate on a few countries other than Germany, so that we can compare and contrast realities of fascism which we discussed in the first, conceptual part of the course with the help of added examples. The countries discussed will be Austria, Spain, Italy, Romania, Hungary, Argentina, Japan, and Russia. We will end the course with a discussion of the New Right forms of contemporary right-wing politics so that we can have a fine temporal comparison with the original fascism fifty years later and thus answer the question better as to whether fascism was something unique in its time or rather a larger and more lasting phenomenon of political rule.

Course requirements: There will be an in-class midterm examination. In addition, there will also be a final paper which will be due on the last day of our class meeting. The paper should be double-spaced, typed, and not exceed twenty (20) pages. It should be on a topic which involves the concepts and materials used in the course. The exact topic will have to be approved by the instructor.

All books used in this course will be available at the bookstore and also willbe placed on reserve in the library.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 499. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 Krautrock.

Instructor(s): Michael R Latham (mrlatham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year beyond German 232. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A tour of post-war German culture through the radio-waves, nightclubs, and record shops of the divided nation. From the in flux of American popular culture in the immediate post-war years, to the folksinger/activist/poets of the 1960's, to the electronic experimenters of the 1970's, the particulary German take on "punk" in the late 70's and early 80's, the artful banalities of the Neue Deutsche Welle, an uneasy look into the musical culture of the far right, ending with an investigation of post-wall, post-Wende, multicultural Germany's appropriations of rap, hip-hop, and electronica. Song texts in German and English. Discussions in English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 499. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 002 Language variation in translation: American films dubbed into German. Meets with Linguistics 492.007.

Instructor(s): Robin M Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year beyond German 232. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/german/499/002.nsf

Linguistic variation (e.g., regional dialects, Ebonics, youth slang etc. ) is often a critical component of character and plot development in film. For instance, in the film Rush Hour , the differences between an African-American police detective and a police detective from Hong Kong are accentuated through differences in their language use. Similarly, in Clueless, differences in a group of high school students' language use helps distinguish the preps from the stoners and jocks.

The central question for this course concerns how linguistic variation is dubbed into German. We will spend the first part of the course exploring the boundaries of linguistic variation and the similarities and differences between variation in German and variation in American English. The remainder of the course will be devoted to the analysis of mainstream American films that have been dubbed into German. Students will construct their own corpora from a larger corpus of 35 films representing action, drama, comedy, and children's film genres and from those develop research questions (e.g. How is the English second person pronoun 'you' dubbed into German? How is slang dubbed?) based on individual and group interests.

The course is oriented as a collaborative research seminar, in which students are highly encouraged to work in independent teams oriented around a single problem or corpus (e.g., action films or children's film). Students will be expected to present their research to the class, write short reports about their projects, and maintain a research diary. Although students should be proficient enough in German to be able to understand a full-length feature film, native-like fluency is not required. Discussion will be in English and German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 504. History of the German Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; or permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The main focus of this course is the development of the German language and its dialects, beginning with the earliest reconstructible stages and working forward through time to the present day. We shall investigate traditional questions of Germanic linguistics changes in sound patterns, grammatical structures and vocabulary, the role of German vs. Latin as an acceptable written medium, German "under attack" from foreign influences in the context of social, cultural, economic, religious, and political trends and events that shaped central Europe. We shall read and discuss previous research in Germanic linguistics, thus gaining an understanding of the development of the discipline as well as of the language itself. The linguistic data with which we will be working will be in German; readings will be in German and in English. Familiarity with basic linguistic terminology will be helpful, but by no means required. We will not dwell on the intricacies of Indo-European and Germanic sound laws or of theoretical debates, but will strive to develop an ability to analyze and discuss important historical issues. Readings (available in a course pack at Accu-Copy) will be heavy. Students will give several informal reports in class during the academic term, write a term paper, and give a formal presentation of the term-paper in class. No quizzes, no tests, no exams. Only reading, writing, and discussing. Undergraduates are more than welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 821. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 Histories of German Cinema. Meets with Film-Video 603.001.

Instructor(s): Johannes F Von Moltke (moltke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/german/310/001.nsf

This course looks back at the history of German Cinema and explores the different ways in which that history has been written to date. It thus serves as an introduction both to the study of German cinema and to broader issues in film historiography:

  • What constitutes a "national cinema"?
  • How do we periodize film history? Besides a limited canon of individual films, what is the "archive" of film history?
  • What methodologies are available for the study and writing of film history?

The course will include weekly screenings of selected films, with an emphasis on films foregrounding questions of German history, allowing us also to probe the relationship between film history and national history.

Reading knowledge of German welcome, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 822. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 002 Cultural Analysis: Bodies, Language, Discourse. Meets with American Culture 699.004.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu) , Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The impact of poststructuralism on the humanities--the so-called "linguistic turn"--has focused our attention on language as a mediator between things and words, between historical events and their reconstruction in the writing of history. As a result of this much-celebrated, much-debated, and much-resisted rapprochement between literary studies and the writing of history, language and textuality have become key concepts in historical research. Recently, however, many historians have turned away from a focus on texts only. Cultural historians have insisted on the irreduceability of the material world to discourse. What is at stake in these debates is the category of difference, between the (literary) text and the (social) context, the difference between the practice of writing and the written word, the textual body and the physical body, but also differentiations within the realm of discourse.

In this course, we will canvas critics that have profoundly shaped this debate. We will read a diverse array of historical writings from different times and world regions. Furthermore, we will immerse ourselves in a broad array of approaches, including, among others, symbolic and cultural anthropology, new historicism, postcolonial studies, gender studies, and the history of sexuality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 822. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 003 Political Culture in German speaking countries. Germany, Austria, and Switzerland

Instructor(s): Anton Pelinka

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will focus on a comparison between Germany, Austria, and Switzerland regarding the following aspects:

  1. Political (Dis-)Continuity - beginning in the 19th century, but emphasizing the 20th century
  2. Political Culture - the specific German, Austrian, and Swiss patterns of politics as developed especially after 1945
The course should:

  1. Describe these developments in all three German speaking countries
  2. Elaborate in a comparative way on the parallels and differences
  3. Analyse and explain the reasons especially for the differences

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 861 / LING 842. Seminar in Sociolinguistics.

Section 001 Introduction to the Sociolinguistics of German.

Instructor(s): Robin M Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Instructor permision. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/german/861/001.nsf

Sociolinguists believe that an understanding of language can only be gained by considering both the extralinguistic and the linguistic contexts in which language is produced, intended, and interpreted. This seminar is intended as an introduction to the sociolinguistics of German. We will focus on questions related to the general study of language in its social context as well as questions specific to the study of German in its social context. In so doing, we will contrast approaches within the Anglo-American and German traditions and consider the theoretical and descriptive consequences of differences between the approaches. We will consider many of the topics which people who call themselves sociolinguists have studied, including the mechanisms of language contact and change, the relationship of identity to language use, language and gender, linguistic diversity and intercultural communication, and the connection between language and language ideology. We also will consider issues that have had particular relevance for the sociolinguistic study of German, including the relationships between different local, regional and national varieties of German, the East-West question, German as a world language, non-native varieties of German, and contact between German and other languages. Finally, we will discuss the practical issues involved in designing and implementing a sociolinguistic project on German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 902. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of chair. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GERMAN 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GERMAN 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


Undergraduate Course Listings for GERMAN.


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