College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in History


This page was created at 4:37 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in History
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTORY

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for History.


HISTORY 401. Problems in Greek History II.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 – Greek Religion: Cult&Competition.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Chaucer Schmalz

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the ancient experience of Greek religion, from the perspective of both the community and the individual, male and female both. Within the religious space of sanctuaries and through the diverse media of architecture, iconography, and textual evidence, we will investigate the central practices of Greek religion: sacrifice and cult ritual, festivals, and sport as athletic competition and maturation rite. The structure of the course evolves around the twin aspects of Greek religion, as a symbolic expression of the Greek city-state (as Polis Religion) and of Greek culture and society as a whole (as Panhellenic Religion). Hence the course is divided into two parts: first an investigation into Polis Religion as experienced in ancient Athens, whose annual religious calendar and sacred landscape is especially well documented; then an exploration of the religious life of Greece's Panhellenic sanctuaries and festivals, particularly Olympia (with its famous Olympic Games) and Delphi (with its equally celebrated Pythian oracle). Since religious celebration was the only formal public role allowed for women in ancient Greece, their experience of and contribution to the sacred life of the city-state and Panhellenic sanctuaries is a major theme of the course. Other themes include notions of the sacred, PanHellenism, boundaries (spatial, temporal, social, and gender), and self-identity (the community, family, and individual).

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • W. Burkert, Greek Religion (Cambridge 1985)
  • P. E. Easterling & J. V. Muir (eds.), Greek Religion and Society (Cambridge 1985)
  • H. W. Parke, Festivals of the Athenians (London 1977) W. Sweet, Sport & Recreation in Ancient Greece. A Sourcebook with Translations (Oxford University Press 1987)
  • L. B. Zaidman & P. S. Pantel, Religion in the Ancient Greek City (Cambridge 1992)
  • Course-Pack Including selections from Civilization of the Ancient Mediterranean, Greece & Rome, (eds.) M. Grant & R. Kitzinger (1988); & Pausanias, Guide to Greece. 2 vols, trans. P. Levi (Penguin).

Plus reserve readings: Additional primaray sources and secondary works.

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HISTORY 420. Modern Germany.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ulrike Weckel

Prerequisites: No credit for those who have completed or are enrolled in Hist. 418 or 419. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the period of postwar reconstruction in East and West Germany until the fall of the wall (1989) and unification (1990). One main focus will be the ways in which Germans on both sides of the wall came to terms with the Nazi-past: The twelve years of Nazi-dictatorship, which was initially built upon broad consent had led to world war, unimaginable crimes against humanity and 50 million dead. The „Third Reich" could only have been stopped by unconditional military surrender, so therefore many German cities and huge parts of industry was destroyed in May 1945. In the aftermath of war and mass murder, it became imperative to explore the reorganization of politics, society, economics, culture, family- and gender relations in order to prevent a repetition. Were there any German traditions that could be revived or institutions that could be rebuilt? Did all Germans have to be re-educated, or should the Allies have been lenient with the politically incriminated in order to get foster support for the new political system? How did Germans in East and West view their own past? This course will analyze not only official policy towards war-criminals, retributions, and public memorial, but also cultural representations of the Nazi period in literature, theater and film and the perception of these works by the audience. We will cover the period of Allied occupation, the beginning and the dynamics of the Cold War, and the establishment of the two German states and their integration into the Eastern and Western blocs. We will also address the debates about whether the two Germanies went their own separate ways, or whether they developed in reaction to one another. How did the Student Revolt of the late 1960s and the rise of the New Left lead to a new policy towards East Germany and how did that change the relationships among people on both sides of the wall? We will also examine the emergence of an opposition in the GDR which finally led - supported by political development in Eastern Europe - to the fall of the wall.

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HISTORY 431. History of the Balkans Since 1878.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a lecture course which surveys the history of the modern Balkans – the area which consists of the ex-Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Greece, and Albania – from roughly 1878 to the present. There are no prerequisites nor required background. Interested first-year students should feel welcome. Grading is based on: one hour exam, a one-hour written exam, writing on one essay question out of about four, one course paper (approximately 15 pages, topic according to student interest but cleared with instructor), and a written final exam (two essay questions to be chosen from a list of about eight questions). Major issues to be covered are: the crisis of 1875-78 with international involvement ending with the Treaty of Berlin, Croatia and Bosnia under the Habsburgs, the development of Bulgaria after 1878, the Macedonia problem, terrorist societies, World War I, the formation of Yugoslavia, nationality problems in Yugoslavia between the Wars, German penetration and the rise of dictatorships in the inter-war Balkans, World War II with Yugoslav and Greek resistance movements (including the Greek Civil War), Tito's Yugoslavia, its 1948 break with the USSR and Yugoslavia's special path to socialism. Nationality problems, the break-up of Yugoslavia, and the ensuing wars.

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HISTORY 434. Russia in the 20th Century: War, Revolution, and Reform.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 005 – A history of the Soviet Union from 1917 through 1991. Graduate students only.

Instructor(s): Jane Burbank (jburbank@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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HISTORY 443 / AAPTIS 487. Modern Middle East History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juan R Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syl/syl443.htm

This lecture course surveys the emergence of the modern Middle East from the three great Muslim empires of the early modern period, the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal. It discusses both indigenous developments and the Western impact in the nineteenth century, looking at reform bureaucracy and millenarian movements as responses to these changes. We then examine the rise of nationalism and the break-up of the Ottoman Empire during and after WW I, and these phenomena are seen as the context or the beginnings of the Palestine issue. Attention is paid to the interwar efforts at building strong states in the region, whether in the Turkey of Ataturk, the Iran of Reza Shah, or Wafdist Egypt. The last part of the course looks at the rise of socialist and pan-Arab ideologies, as well as of opposing ideologies such as Islamic activism after WW II. The impact of petroleum, the Palestinian issue, the turn toward bourgeois liberalism, and Shi'ite movements such as the Iranian Revolution and the Hizbullah phenomenon in Lebanon, and the Gulf War of 1991, will all be addressed in this section. Students will take a midterm and a final examination, and will write a ten-page term paper on a subject of their choosing. Reading in this course comes to about 150 pages per week.

Required texts: (Available at Shaman Drum, 313 S. State St., tel. 662-7407, and at Reserve Reading Room, 3rd Floor, Shapiro Undergraduate Library):

  • Daniel, Elton L. The History of Iran. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 2000.
  • Kahlil Gibran. Broken Wings. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1999.
  • Nageeb Mahfouz. Midaq Alley. Trans. Trevor LeGassick. New York: Anchor Books, 1992.
  • Afaf Lutfi al-Sayyid Marsot. A Short History of Modern Egypt. Cambridge Univ. Press, 1985.
  • Milton-Edwards, Beverley. Contemporary politics in the Middle East. Malden, MA : Blackwell Publishers, 2000.
  • Charles C. Smith. Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict. St. Martin's, 3nd edition, 1997.
  • Erik J. Zurcher. Turkey: A Modern History. New York: I.B. Tauris/ St. Martin's, 1998.
  • A short course pack will be available at: Accucopy

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 449. Topics in Middle Eastern History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 – Muslims Under and After Socialism: Former Soviet Union, China and Eastern Europe. Meets with AAPTIS 491.001, AAPTIS 451.001, Asian Studies 380.001, and Anthropology 458.003.

Instructor(s): Morgan Liu (morgman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 491.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 450. Japan to 1700.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sidney DeVere Brown

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A general introduction to the historical development of the Japanese people. Emphasis is given to the internal political, social, economic, and religious aspects of this development up to the end of the eighteenth century, when the Tokugawa hegemony was threatened by external forces.

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HISTORY 459. Gender, Medicine, and Culture in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin S Pernick (mpernick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course compares men and women as healers and as patients, and the connections between medical and cultural gender roles in US history, from the colonial era to the present, focussing on the past two centuries. We will examine how changes in gender both affected and reflected changes in medicine and culture, emphasizing connections between changing concepts of health and of gender. The course will be taught primarily in lecture format, though periodic in-class discussion groups will also be held. Reading assignments will range from modern histories to old medical journals, newspaper articles, poetry and films. Although no background in history, gender studies, or medicine is required, prior coursework in at least one such area would be helpful. There will be essay-style midterm and final exams, a seven page book review paper, and bi-weekly short quizzes.

The course is not open to first-year undergraduates. Those who miss the first meeting without advance permission will be dropped from the course; if you are considering whether to register you must be at the first meeting to preserve the option of enrolling.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 461. The American Revolution.

U.S. History

Section 005 – Meets with History 461.005. (Graduate students only).

Instructor(s): David J Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An intensive course on the background to the Revolution, its progress, and the changes it wrought in American life. Emphasis on America's mid-18th-century socioeconomic transformation, Britain's reorganization of her empire in the 1760s and 1770s, colonial opposition, and the emergence of a uniquely American ideology. Subsequent topics include the progress and disclocations of the military conflict, the attempt at confederation, and the culmination of the Revolutionary movement in the iteration and early development of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

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HISTORY 463. The Origins of the American Civil War, 1830-1860.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course attempts to understand the causes of the American Civil War. It begins with a description of the society of the ante-bellum South; turns next to a portrait of Jacksonian politics and political ideology; then takes up that transmutation of Jacksonian ideals in the 1840's and 1850's through which hostile sectional stereotypes were defined. It culminates with an exploration of the sense in which the intellectual, social, religious, and economic conflicts in America came to be summarized by the slavery question during the period, because of the demands of political competition. There will be a midterm exam, a research paper of ten pages, and a two-hour final examination. Reading will average about 250 pages a week. Enrollment will be limited to forty students, in order to facilitate class discussion.

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HISTORY 465. Emergence of the Modern United States, 1876-1901.

U.S. History

Section 001 – Modern US 1865-1901. Meets with American Culture 345.001.

Instructor(s): Maria Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/history/465/001.nsf

Greed, violence, excesses of wealth, extreme poverty, xenophobia, media spectacles, unstable gender roles, manhood under attack, uppity women, white supremacy on the rise, crimes of hatred and fear. Does this invoke the 1990s in your mind? Think again. These are all words that describe the end of the 19th century – the Gilded Age. This course explores the period between the end of the Civil War and the dawn of the twentieth century by focusing on industrialization, territorial expansion, the rise of cities, new forms of sexual and racial classification and control, political transformations, work culture, and the emergence of mass consumer culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 467. The United States Since 1933.

U.S. History

Section 011 – Meets with History 467.001. (Graduate students only).

Instructor(s): Thomas Guglielmo

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course provides a comprehensive view of American history and of life in America from the Great Depression to the present day. Among the subjects treated are the New Deal; World War II; the Cold War; McCarthy and McCarthyism; the Fair Deal; the New Frontier; the Great Society; the turbulence of the 1960's (the Black revolt and Black power, the counterculture and youth revolt, the new feminism and women's liberation); the war in Vietnam; Nixon and the Watergate affair; the 1980s and the Reagan presidency; and the presidencies of Bush and Clinton. Several paperbacks are assigned for the course, but no textbook is used. There is a midterm and a final examination in the course, and a paper is required.

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HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 – U.S. Women, Work and Economics.

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Mead

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class addresses U.S. women's economic and labor history, including much of women's economic activity that is not acknowleged as "work" because it is unpaid. Topics include reproductive and social labor, pre-industrial economic activities, industrialization, gender segregation in labor markets, trade unionism, female entrepreneurship, economic restructuring, women and globalization.

  • Alice Kessler-Harris, Out to Work (Oxford University Press, 1982).
  • Rosalyn Baxandall and Linda Gordon, America's Working Women: A Documentary History, 1600 to Present, rev ed. (W.W. Norton & Company, 1995). Required Readings
  • Gwendolyn Mink, ed., Whose Welfare? (Cornell University Press, 1999).
  • Jacqueline Jones, Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow (Vintage Books, 1995)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 002 – 19Th CENTURY AFRICAN- AMERICAN HISTORY. Meets with CAAS 458.002.

Instructor(s): Martha Jones (msjonz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/caas/458/002.nsf

During the nineteenth century African American life underwent a sea-change. The founding of independent black political, religious and cultural institutions, the transition from slavery to freedom, the emergence of women into public life, and the political enfranchisement then disenfranchisement of black men were among the transformations that would mean that African-American life in 1900, at the century's end, was remarkably different from that of 1800. This course will explore the nature of these changes in four units: the creation of community in the antebellum North, the culture of enslaved people, the Black Civil War experience, and the century's final years with the rise of Jim Crow and the advent of the women's era. In addition to reading the work of historians, students will be asked to use maps, films, museum exhibits and nineteenth century newspapers to understand some of the forces that shaped the lives of black Americans. Students will be evaluated based upon contribution to class discussion andthe completion of research and writing projects. The cost of books and related materials will be between $50 and $100.

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HISTORY 469. Precolonial Southeast Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines select problems in the history of both mainland and island Southeast Asia from the start of the first milennium C.E. to the early 19th century, on the eve of colonial rule. Its focus is simultaneously political, cultural, and economic. It seeks to explain why, particularly on the mainland, localized political and economic systems coalesced with increasing speed and success, chiefly from the 15th century, and why similar integrative trends in the island world were less sustained. But at the same time it seeks to explore in open-ended fashion the relation between international and domestic economic stimuli, cultural importation and cultural creativity, institutional demands and patrimonial norms. Principal thematic topics include: Indianization, the rise of the classical states and their chief features, the collapse of the classical states, reintegration on the mainland, the age of commerce thesis, comparisons between Theravada, Neo-Confucian, the Muslim Southeast Asia, the early role of Europeans, the 18th century crises, Southeast Asia on the eve of colonial intervention.
Requirements: Meets weekly, two to three research papers using secondary sources, no final exam, all graduate and advanced undergraduates welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 475(580). The History of American Constitutional Law.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mills Thornton (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of the evolution of American constitutional law from 1789 to the present. It will rely primarily upon reading the selections from the opinions of the U.S. Supreme Court to be found in A.T. Mason and D.G. Stephenson, Jr., eds., American Constitutional Law, and Stanley Kutler, ed., The Supreme Court And The Constitution. The goal will be to discover how the different material circumstances and social and political assumptions of each age in American history have been reflected in the Supreme Court's shifting conceptions of the meaning of the Constitution. In this way, we will seek to define how beliefs about the essential character of American republicanism have been altered through time, and in addition, to appreciate the Supreme Court's changing understanding of its own role in the constitutional order. There are no prerequisites for the course, but History 160-161 or an equivalent understanding of the general structure of American history is assumed. There will be a midterm examination of ninety minutes, a ten-page term paper, and a two-hour final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 – Race and Citizenship in Comparative Perspective: The United States and Cuba, 1865-1965. Meets with Law 877.001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores the relationship of law and society during a process of radical political and social transformation: the end of slavery and the redefining of the boundaries of race and citizenship. In the United States, male former slaves became full political participants for the brief period of Reconstruction, but massive retrenchment followed and by the early 20th Century, African Americans had been virtually eliminated from Southern electoral politics. In Cuba, by contrast, shortly after slavery was abolished a large-scale cross-racial nationalist movement emerged whose legacy was a strong claim to citizenship by Afro-Cuban veterans, a claim that led to the incorporation of a guarantee of universal manhood suffrage in the Cuban Constitution of 1901. Thus at the same moment that Black disfranchisement in much of the South was allowed to stand by the U.S. Supreme Court, cross-racial enfranchisement was written into the Cuban Constitution. The subsequent histories of voting and political participation in both societies were framed within this contrast, through the period of the Cuban revolution of 1959 and the U.S. Voting Rights Act of 1965. In exploring these contrasting histories, we will read key legal cases, historical testimony, and secondary account, paying attention to the interplay of law, electoral politics, and other forms of collective action.

The seminar will meet once a week for two hours, and will be open to law students, advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

Law students will receive two credits for this seminar, but may enroll for an additional one credit of research with Prof. Scott, and undertake an additional writing assignment. LSA undergraduates will participate in an extra one-hour discussion section and will receive three credits.

Admission is by permission of the instructor, via email to rjscott@umich.edu, along with the regular admission procedures for Law School seminars.

Professor Scott is a faculty member in the Department of History and a specialist on post-emancipation societies in Latin America and the United States, currently the Sunderland Fellow at the Law School.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 – Latin America, National Period

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 – The Caucasus Since the Fall of the Soviet Union.

Instructor(s): Gerard J Libaridian

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the role of ethnicity in the rise of conflicts in the Caucasus during the last century. It will examine militarized conflicts (such as in Nagorno Karabagh, Abkhazia, and Chechnya) as well as latent ones (such as Javakheti, Ajaria, and Daghestan). The evolution of ethnicity and nationalism will be studied in conjunction with the role of religion, class, Russian and Soviet nationalities policies, and more recently, of state-building in independent Armenia, Azerbaijjan, and Georgia.

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HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 002 – Histories of Art and Histories of Nations. Meets with History of Art 489.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas C Willette

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 489.001.

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HISTORY 486. Social History of Early Modern England.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael P Macdonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Hist. 220 and junior standing are recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course surveys the social history of England from the later Middle Ages until the Industrial Revolution. Its principal concern is with the course of social change and its effects on the behavior and attitudes of men and women of all social classes. It will explain how population rise, inflation and the Reformation led to increasing social and cultural polarization, and also examine institutions that experienced comparatively little change, such as the family, and explore why. A great deal of attention will be given to the fundamental social hierarchies of the period – status, gender, and age – so that the values of the period are understandable. The political events that affected social relations, most notably the English Revolution of 1640-1660, will be discussed.

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HISTORY 494 / ECON 494. Topics in Economic History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 – Economic History of Japan.

Instructor(s): Gary R Saxonhouse (grsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 101 and 102. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Economics 494.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 001 – Cities and History. Meets with Institute for the Humanities 511.001.

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Modern metropolises have been the scenes of nation-state, news-making history. Yet, little is known about the ways the metropolises make history: by their structure and functioning; by their barricades and by the ways in which they are livable; by the broadness, smoothness or roughness of their streets; and even by how much light their windows let in, by their squares, public and apartment buildings, monuments, sewage systems, and theaters.

Metropolises are agents of history. The course will examine this thesis. Each of the five segments of the course will focus on a different metropolis and national history, and will entail the reading and discussion of one scholarly and one literary text. We will draw on a number of disciplines, including history, architecture and urban planning, anthropology, and literary criticism, but our emphasis will be on intense and sensitive reading, within and beyond the disciplines. The five modern cities we will study (subject to change depending on the inclination of the students) are: Paris (focus will be on the 1860s and 1870s, but reading and discussion will go beyond), Prague (of around the 1910s and beyond), Berlin (the 1920s and 1930s and more), New York (the 1950s in particular), and Jakarta (especially the 1960s through 1990s). The course will be open to the higher-level undergraduates and graduates in history, architecture and urban planning, anthropology, and literary criticism. People beyond any of these disciplines are very welcome as well. The requirement for the completion of the course is active and intense reading, presence at discussions, and a final paper of original research into "city and history" of about 25 pages.

The course is designed for 6 to 12 students. There will be frequent individual meetings with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 002 – Nonviolent Political Movements.

Instructor(s): Stewart N Gordon (sngordon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We open with a brief survey of the historical roots of non-violence – Quakers and Shakers, Transcendentalists and Suffragettes, Buddhists and Jains, and Gandhi. Wider themes include moral community, public space, non-violence and coercion, and definitions of success and failure. Most of the course involves students (in groups) closely analyzing non-violent movements, such as those against Hitler, plus Solidarity, the Civil Rights movement, anti-nuclear, anti-war, and environmental movements in various countries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 003 – Imperialism&PacificIslands19C. Meets with American Culture 496.005.

Instructor(s): Damon Salesa

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/history/498/003.nsf

See American Culture 496.005.

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HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 004 – Steam Engines and Computers: From Industrial Proletarians to Information Workers. Meets with Sociology 495.001 and RC Social Science 360.003.

Instructor(s): Thomas W O'Donnell

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 360.003.

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HISTORY 572 / CAAS 533 / AMCULT 533. Black Civil Rights from 1900.

U.S. History

Section 001 – The Origins of Black Studies

Instructor(s): Kevin Gaines (gainesk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: CAAS 201 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 533.001.

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HISTORY 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 001 – Shattered Hopes, Princely Ambition. Meets Jan 29-March 26. (Drop/Add deadline=February 12).

Instructor(s): de Boer

Prerequisites: (1-2).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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HISTORY 591. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 – Going to the Fair.

Instructor(s): A Michael Wintroub (wintroub@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upper-class standing. (3). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Whether it be the school field-trip, the Sunday visit, or the tourist excursion, when one crosses over the museum's threshold, one enters into a space marking a clear point of separation from everyday life and into the sanctity of an imagined community of fellow worshipers. As William Hazlitt said about the National Gallery in 1824, "to visit this holy of holies is like going on a pilgrimage – it is an act of devotion performed at the shrine of Art." The site of the museum can be likened to a place of worship, the visitor to a pilgrim, and the objects collected within its walls, to holy relics placed on view for the initiated to worship. But how did museums come to be endowed with this aura of holiness? What relationship – if any – did (or do) they have with religious ritual and spiritual devotion? Where did the first collections originate? And indeed, why did people begin to collect at all? These are some of the questions we will try to answer in this course. We will explore the historical role that museums and museum collections have played in maintaining – and defining – the cultural values (and power) of elite or privileged groups. At the same time, by examining related institutions, practices and events, such as exhibitions, fairs and carnivals, we will also explore sites of resistance to these "official" values. We will read about festivals in ancient Greece and Rome, about the trade in Saints' relics in the middle ages, about charivaris (festivals) in which women became men and men women, about court spectacles and cabinets of curiosity; we will also read about the very first museums, about practice of collecting and travel, about colonial politics, and evolutionary theory; we will end our historical examination of the museum by trying to understand its place in the constitution of modernity itself.

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HISTORY 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

Section 001 – Comparative Slavery in a Circum-Atlantic Perspective. Meets with Women's Studies 698.003, American Culture 699.001, CAAS 558.001.

Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Atlantic Studies Graduate Initiative's core seminar for this academic year will use a comparative study of slavery to map the production and reproduction of power in the Atlantic world…that vortex of interactive peoples, cultures, economies. At the heart of the Atlantic world lies "the American holocaust," "the diasporic and genocidal history of Africa and the Americas." Race is central to this world and its exploration, as is gender. Indeed, a central theme of this course will involve the ways power and resistance to power are always engendered and racialized.

Modern slavery and the seizure of native lands are co-terminus with the Age of Discovery, the Renaissance, and the origins of modern imperial states. Indeed, modernity itself in the arts, science, literature, the economy, and political structures began with the "Age of Discovery" and the origins of modern slavery. The riches of Mexico and Peru, along with the enslavement of indigenous people, fueled Europe's commercial revolution. Profits from the slave trade and the plantation/slave economies of the Caribbean underwrote Britain's industrial revolution. They made European settlement of North America and the westward expansion of the United States possible. The existence of slavery shadowed the Enlightenment's celebration of liberty and the Declaration of Independence's promise of equality. Slavery transformed societies, economies and cultures in Africa, the Caribbean and the Western Hemisphere from Brazil to the Chesapeake. Enriching Europeans and European Americans, the "American holocaust" was a composite of unspeakable acts which, for centuries, European American culture has struggled to repress, displace, refashion, and transform. These memories have never died. Indefinitely deferred, they shadow American cultural productions and the very performance of "American-ness." As literary historian Joseph Roach reminds us, the history of the Circum-Atlantic and the history of the United States "is a monumental study in the pleasures and torments of incomplete forgetting."

A feminist exploration of the ways race and power produced and reproduced also lies at the heart of this seminar. If we cannot understand the birth of capitalism and consumerism as separate from slavery, so we cannot understand modern gender relations and sexualities separate from both capitalism and slavery. Womanhood was and is a highly racialized concept. Whose bodies were and are admitted under that category, whose excluded and in what ways, is critical to any consideration of modernity. Gender and power, gender and agency, gender and resistance will be recurrent themes the seminar will explore.

This seminar deals with memories indefinitely deferred and their tortured irruption in politics, literature, the arts, music and film. Readings will offer a highly interdisciplinary exploration of representation and memory, of slavery and its centrality to the Circum-Atlantic world. Two Atlantic Studies Graduate Initiative Symposia planned for February and March will play a central role in this seminar. One, Atlantic Axis, focuses on the origins of slavery in the early modern period. The other offers an interdisciplinary and comparative study of 18th and 19th century slavery in Brazil, Haiti, and the United States.

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HISTORY 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

Section 002 – Anthopology/History Core Seminar. Meets with Anthropology 658.002.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler , Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/anthrcul/658/002.nsf

See Cultural Anthropology 658.002.

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HISTORY 605. Aspects of Ancient Indian History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carla M Sinopoli (sinopoli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will blend archaeological and historical methods and sources in a close examination of aspects of premodern India. The course will be organized around a number of issues in which archaelogy and history are entangled: the uses of India's past in current politics; language and race; gender; states and empires; comodities and economies. It would be appropriate for graduate students or advanced undergrads with interests in India, and in the relation between history and archaeology.

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HISTORY 611. The Literature of American History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Juster (sjuster@umich.edu) , Maria Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Juniors or seniors with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/history/611/001.nsf

No Description Provided

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HISTORY 612 / AMCULT 616. Native American History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Liza Black (lizab@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/history/612/001.nsf

See American Culture 616.001.

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HISTORY 617 / LACS 619 / ANTHRCUL 619. Proseminar on Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Section 001 – MESTIZAJE AND NATIONAL IDENTITY IN LATIN AMERICA. Meets with Spanish 855.001.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu) , Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Spanish 855.001.

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HISTORY 618 / LACS 618 / ANTHRCUL 618. Early Ethnography in South America.

Section 001 – Dramas, Miracles, Metaphors: Studies in Andean History.

Instructor(s): Sabine G MacCormack (sgm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Latin American and Caribbean Studies 618.001.

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HISTORY 623 / ECON 664. Problems in American Economic History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren C Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Economics 401, 402, and 405 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/econ/664/001.nsf

See Economics 664.001.

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HISTORY 625. Studies in Balkan History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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HISTORY 626. Studies in Byzantine History.

Section 001 – Topic?

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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HISTORY 628. Studies in Jewish History.

Section 001 – Topic?

Instructor(s): Todd M Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to the central issues in European Jewish history from the end of the age of emancipation to the start of World War II. In most countries in Western and Central Europe, this period witnessed the failure of Jewish emancipation and the dashing of expectations to which it had given birth. In Eastern Europe, the failure of the tsarist empire to reform itself foreclosed any possiblity of western-style emancipation. As a result, Jews in both the East and the West sought new solutions to what was now being called the "Jewish Question" – among them, revolutionary socialism, Jewish nationalism, radical assimilation, aestheticism, and various universalistic creeds. In addition, in the East, millions of Jews voted with their feet and fled westward, to Berlin, Vienna, Paris, London, and, above all, the cities of the New World. While it is easy to stereotype this period as one of mounting despair and danger, this was also a period of intellectual ferment, cultural creativity, and, in the case of the western Jewish bourgeoisie, material security. The tensions between these seemingly opposite trends will form one of the focal points of the seminar.

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HISTORY 637 / SI 637. Problems in the Administration of Archives.

Section 001 – Archives, Social Memory, and the American Slave Experience. Meets with History 796.001 and Rackham 570.004.

Instructor(s): Francis X Blouin (fblouin@umich.edu) , Earl Lewis , William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: History 600; Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 796.001.

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HISTORY 640. Studies in Early Modern European History.

Section 001 – Popular Religion ,Magic & Cult Change.

Instructor(s): Michael P MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of one European language. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce graduate students to the literature concerning popular belief in early modern Europe, focusing mainly (but not exclusively) on England. It will consider the nature of popular culture and the meaning of the term for a start. Then it will examine some classic studies that attempt to characterize it and its relations with elite or learned culture. These will concern Europe as a whole, France, Germany and Italy as well as England. Because so many of the beliefs of early modern people concerned the supernatural, we shall explore the nature of lay religion before and after the English Reformation and the changing boundary between it and magic. Finally, we shall also attend to the tensions between official doctrine and lay preferences in liturgical and lay ritual and the attempt to reform or suppress popular recreations and festivals.

Some of the classic texts we shall examine are Peter Burke, Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe; Robert Chartier's the Culture of the Book; Robert Scribner's For the Sake of Simple Folk; Carlo Ginzburg's The Cheese and the Worms; Keith Thomas' Religion and the Decline of Magic. Among the more recent texts that will allow us to see how these pioneering works have endured will be books by Tim Harris, David Cressy, Ronald Hutton, Christopher Marsh and a raft of bright young scholars of witchcraft. We may examine a book or two by Michael MacDonald if he doesn't chicken out.

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HISTORY 640. Studies in Early Modern European History.

Section 002 – German 18th Century in Europ Comp.

Instructor(s): Ulrike Weckel

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of one European language. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Eighteenth century Germany did not face a revolution, neither political revolution as in France nor an industrial revolution as in England. Nevertheless, the social changes were immense and laid the ground for the emergence of civil societies in the 19th and 20th centuries. Taking the Enlightenment as a central focus, this course will examine how the educated elite gathered, disseminated and realized their visions of education, gender relations, public good („Gemeinwohl"), and the state. Central fields of interest will be the history of private life, the "revolution of reading", the emergence of a public sphere, and the practises of sociability. The German formation of a bourgeois civil society will be compared to parallel developments especially in France and Great Britain. The course is conceived not only for graduate students who specialize in doing research in this particular field. Study of the eighteenth century as the era between the so-called "early-modern" and "modern" periods of German and/or European history will allow us to scrutinize "modernity" in the making, while exploring how older traditions were questioned yet continued to live on. At the same time new concepts did not immediately garner support; it was sometimes several decades before they could be set into practise (if at all). Therefore the eighteenth century offers a chance to study alternative visions of the social, political, and cultural development that were lost from the historical record. The study of an unfamiliar society offers a closer reading and possibilities for more careful interpretation by avoiding the illusion that we understand easily what was at stake.

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HISTORY 659. Studies in British History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kali A K Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a graduate seminar focused on reading and discussion of a range of influential, challenging, or innovative works in modern British history, from the late 18th century to the present. Readings will be mostly comprised of works in social and cultural history but we will also read some works in political history and attend to some ongoing political arguments within historical scholarship. We will also read fiction and some non-fiction literary prose. Themes which will recur throughout the course include narratives of nation and empire; representations of class, gender, and sexuality; religion; education; and visual and literary cultures. This course will provide a good frame for students pursuing major or minor fields in British history or those hoping for useful comparisons to their own geographic fields; it is also highly suitable for students from outside the history department who wish to explore some themes in British historical scholarship. Assignments will include short papers and one longer essay on a topic of your choice.

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HISTORY 663 / AAPTIS 663. Persian Historiography from Medieval to Early Modern Times.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 461 or 464, Reading knowledge of Persian is helpful. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 663.001.

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HISTORY 667. The Ancient Empires of Southeast Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines select problems in the history of both mainland and island Southeast Asia from the start of the first milennium C.E. to the early 19th century, on the eve of colonial rule. Its focus is simultaneously political, cultural, and economic. It seeks to explain why, particularly on the mainland, localized political and economic systems coalesced with increasing speed and success, chiefly from the 15th century, and why similar integrative trends in the island world were less sustained. But at the same time it seeks to explore in open-ended fashion the relation between international and domestic economic stimuli, cultural importation and cultural creativity, institutional demands and patrimonial norms. Principal thematic topics include: Indianization, the rise of the classical states and their chief features, the collapse of the classical states, reintegration on the mainland, the age of commerce thesis, comparisons between Theravada, Neo-Confucian, the Muslim Southeast Asia, the early role of Europeans, the 18th century crises, Southeast Asia on the eve of colonial intervention.

Requirements: Meets weekly, two to three research papers using secondary sources, no final exam, all graduate and advanced undergraduates welcome.

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HISTORY 688. Studies in Twentieth-Century American History.

Section 001 – The Social Construction of Liberalism in Twentieth Century America.

Instructor(s): Terrence J McDonald (tmcd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Although American historians now agree that the United States was not "born liberal," the process by which liberalism became a hegemonic discourse, a state structure, a popular culture, and a powerful historical narrative still needs further analysis. This course will concern itself with the multiple sites at which the building of liberalism can be observed, covering such topics as the emergence of liberal social theory, the role of class, race, and gender in liberal theory and practice, the centrality of opposition and repression in liberal politics, the meanings of liberal "pluralism," and its alternatives, the construction of economic dependence and consumption, the rise and decline of the so-called "Progressive," "New Deal," and "Great Society" liberal political coalitions, the construction and dismantling of the social welfare state, and the continuing power of liberal historiography. Through its focus on liberalism, the course will also provide a general introduction to the historiography of and research opportunities in twentieth century American history.

Students will write two essays, a 5-8 page review of some reading assigned for the course, and a longer consideration of the historiography of a significant topic in twentieth century American history.

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HISTORY 691. Studies in Latin American and Caribbean History.

Section 001 – The National Period

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; undergraduates with permission of instructor. Reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is highly desirable. History 477 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This studies course is designed to help prepare doctoral students for the general examination in Latin American history of the national period, while at the same time exploring new directions in historical enquiry. Our thematic focus will include work on the wars of independence, the formation of national states, labor systems, race and nationality, gender, agrarian structures, and the dynamics of popular mobilization. Students will be assumed to have taken an undergraduate survey of Latin American history,or to be enrolled in one concurrently. Admission is by permission of instructor only. Contact Professor Scott at rjscott@umich.edu.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 002 – Cultural Analysis: Bodies, Language, Discourse. Meets with American Culture 699.004 and German 822.002.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu) , Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 822.002.

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HISTORY 700. Independent Research Seminar.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows faculty to offer required seminar work to graduate students on an individual basis during terms when their regular seminars are not scheduled to be offered.

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HISTORY 715. Seminar in Early Modern European History.

Section 001 – The Concept of Europe in the Early Modern Period.

Instructor(s): Diane Owen Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of French or German. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

One of the three continents of the ancient oikoumene, Europe remained throughout the middle ages and imprecise area and an undeveloped concept. This course will consider the ways in which a sense of Europe - as a bounded territory and as a cultural entity developed in the centuries that also saw its religious fracturing and its division into self-consciously competitive states (and their expansion into other continents). We will take up a variety of subjects and use a number of different kinds of documents in order to examine the way in which continental definition was achieved: the cartographic project with the maps and atlases it produced; diplomatic representations both within and outside of Europe seen through the voluminous documents they gave rise to; travel literature and artistic representation of otherness both within Europe and between Europe and other continents (including the new genre of the costume book with its focus on national, ethnic, and class difference). Some attention will also be paid to Europe as viewed by others, particularly from within the Ottoman Empire, which, of course, ruled parts of it.. One purpose of the course will be to introduce students to a range of sources that transgress the usual disciplinary and national boundaries (many examples of which exist here at Michigan in the Hatcher and Clements Libraries in editions contermporary to the period). Final seminar papers may however be confined to students' areas of expertise and specialization.

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HISTORY 719. Seminar in Modern European History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathleen M Canning (kcanning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a historical research seminar in which participants complete a research paper on a topic of their choice and in their own area of study. Seminar meetings will focus on the tasks associated with the framing and writing of historical research papers. We will explore the relationship between concepts and evidence, between broader historiographies and specific case studies, between the narrative and material aspects of the production of historical work. We will also consider, where relevant, the relationship between disciplinary codes and customs and interdisciplinary impulses in participant's projects. The coruse will serve as a forum in which students present their works-in-progress, read and offer written responses to each other's work. Although the instructor's own fields are modern Europe and gender history, this course is open to students in all fields of historical study.

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HISTORY 729 / SOC 729. Large-Scale Political Transformations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret R Somers (peggs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Soc. 100, 195, or 300; reading knowledge of one European language other than English; Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/729/001.nsf

See Sociology 729.001.

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HISTORY 749. Seminar in Modern Near Eastern History.

Section 001 – Islam, Revivalism, and Fundamentalism in the Modern Arab World.

Instructor(s): Juan Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of French or Arabic. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will discuss key works about religion in the modern Arab world, including the issue of religion, violence and terrorism. Students will have an opportunity to write seminar papers on the subject and on the historiography and debates that have grown up around it.

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HISTORY 761. Seminar in Early American History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carol F Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides you with the opportunity to research an original question in pre-1860 American history and write the first draft of a publishable article based on your findings. During the first few weeks, we will meet as a class to discuss readings that speak, directly or indirectly, to question formulation, research strategies, evidence evaluation, historical methods, theoretical frameworks, and argument construction. Following these discussions, you will formulate your own question, begin your research, and develop a prospectus, with group meetings held to explore potential research guides and sources in and beyond Michigan libraries. The second half of the term you will be working on your own much of the time, with regular individual meetings with me and group sessions arranged to discuss problems and progress. If you decide to take this course, please let me know and, before December 20 if possible, give me a copy of an article that you greatly admire and that is in or close to your main field of interest. These articles will be included in our initial group discussions and will guide my choice of both additional readings for those weeks and the human and electronic resources I will draw upon to assist you in your research.

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HISTORY 772 / PUBPOL 770. Seminar in American Social History.

Section 001 – History & Domestic Policy Making.

Instructor(s): Maris A Vinovskis (vinovski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The seminar will focus on how historians have viewed and participated in the policymaking process. Following several more general discussions of history and policymaking, the seminar will analyze how history has been used recently in developing federal policies in education, but efforts will be made to relate those experiences to other areas of policymaking as well.

Each student will write a 25-45 page paper on some aspect of federal, state, or local policymaking from an historical perspective. The topics should reflect the students own interests and can cover a wide variety of different policy subjects (students certainly can select areas other than education policy if they desire to do so).

Books Available for Purchase

  • Richard E. Neustadt and Ernest R. May, Thinking in Time: The Uses of History for Decision-Makers (New York: Free Press, 1986). [paperback]
  • Maris A. Vinovskis, History and Educational Policymaking (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1999). [hardcover]

    All assigned materials are on reserve at the Undergraduate Reserve Room and are also available for purchase at the Shaman Drum Bookshop.

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    HISTORY 793 / MENAS 695 / AAPTIS 793. The Study of the Near East.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Middle Eastern and North African Studies 695.001.

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    HISTORY 795 / REES 795 / POLSCI 795 / ECON 795 / GEOG 795 / RUSSIAN 795. Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies.

    Instructor(s): Jane R Burbank (jburbank@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 795.

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    HISTORY 796. Topics in History.

    Section 001 – Archives, Social Memory, and the American Slave Experience. Meets with History 637.001 and Rackham 570.004.

    Instructor(s): Francis X Blouin (fblouin@umich.edu) , William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu) , Earl Lewis

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will address the following question focusing on the American slave experience: What is our past and how do we know it? We will explore new conceptions of what constitutes the study of the past – new ideas of narration and of social memory. We will discuss the conflicted role of documentary evidence (i.e., archives) in forming a sense of the past. Finally, we will focus on problems in conveying the history of the American slave experience through narration, documentary interpretation, and evolving public policy. It will be taught jointly by professors Blouin, Rosenberg, and Lewis as a Rackham Interdisciplinary seminar.

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    HISTORY 796. Topics in History.

    Section 002 – Technology as Power: Ideology, Infrastructure, and Practice. Meets with Rackham 570.001.

    Instructor(s): Paul N Edwards (pne@umich.edu) , Gabrielle Hecht (hechtg@umich.edu) , Joel D Howell (jhowell@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/rackham/570/001.nsf

    This seminar focuses on the creation, performance, and contestation of social and political power through technology. Graduate students will explore a range of theories about how technology has shaped the contemporary world. Readings will be drawn mainly from Science and Technology Studies, an interdisciplinary field encompassing scholarship in history, sociology, anthropology, and cultural studies.

    The seminar will examine how political, social, and cultural factors shape technological development, as well as how technological development changes society, politics, and culture. By treating technologies as systems comprised of human, artifactual, cultural, and institutional components, we will explore how studying technology may enable us to transcend analytic divides common in the social sciences and humanities – in particular, oppositions between macro- and micro- levels of analysis, and between material and discursive analysis. We will encourage the study of technologies that have not yet been received critical attention.
    The seminar will deploy three ways of viewing technology: as ideology, as infrastructure, and as practice. Topics will include constructing and measuring truth; creating infrastructures; information infrastructure and/as social power; geographies of technology; machines and healing practices; technology, medicine, and colonialism; medicine, technology, race, and multiculturalism; constructing and reproducing gender; and hybridity in technology and medicine.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 796. Topics in History.

    Section 003 – Seminar on History of American Education. Meets with Education 841.001.

    Instructor(s): Jeffrey E Mirel (jmirel@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This seminar explores the history of American urban public school systems with an emphasis on the development of important issues and policies currently being addressed in these systems. Some of the topics that will be examined include school choice, decentralization, mayoral takeovers, and whole school reform. Students will write a 25-35 page research paper on a topic of their choice.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 798 / CAAS 798. Seminar in Comparative Studies in History.

    Section 001 – EmpiresStates&Polit Imaginatio.

    Instructor(s): Frederick Cooper (fcooper@umich.edu) , Jane R

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    HISTORY 802. Reading Course.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    HISTORY 804. Reading for the General Examination.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/history/grad/PreliminaryExamFields.html

    The preliminary examinations ensure that students have acquired the necessary background for teaching and scholarship in history. Field requirements for the prelim encourage a combination of breadth and depth. Normally, students will prepare at least one geographical/temporal field, usually the major field, and at least one distribution field different in area and/or time from the major field. Students will customize another field to the specific needs, in consultation with their advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies. This field can be geographical, temporal, topical, or methodological. Students are also required to offer a cognate field in another discipline or interdisciplinary program on a subject that will enrich their preparation for teaching and research in history. Other programs may be pursued with the approval of the Graduate Committee.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    HISTORY 825 / CHIN 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    A course for students working on special research projects in Asian history.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 898. Dissertation Colloquium Candidacy.

    Instructor(s): Kathleen M Canning (kcanning@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Participation in the Dissertation Colloquium for doctoral students nearing the job market stage is required, although official enrollment for one credit is optional.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    HISTORY 900. Preparation for Preliminary Examinations.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Normally to be taken only in the term in which a student plans to take his general preliminary examinations. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-6).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This is an ungraded course of one to six credits which students nearing their preliminary examination elect. It may be taken in the term before or during which the student plans to take the examination.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    HISTORY 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    HISTORY 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


    Undergraduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


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