College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History of Art


This page was created at 4:37 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in History of Art
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTART

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for History of Art.


HISTART 403 / NRE 403. History of Human Interaction with the Land.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth A Brabec (ebrabec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/nre/403/001.nsf

This course will survey the design and management of human settlements and their surrounding landscapes throughout history. The discussions will focus on man's interaction with the land as is evident in urban patterns, regional patterns of settlement, functional landscapes, and gardens and recreational landscapes, including those which were formally designed and those which emerged from vernacular influences. The range of examples and sites will be viewed within the context of the cultural, political, social and environmental forces which shaped them, and also their lingering effect on 20th century perceptions of nature and the landscape. The course will consist of slide-illustrated lectures by the instructor during which questions and discussion are encouraged. Grading will be in the form of a midterm, a final exam and written assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 405. Artists and Patrons.

Section 001 China in Comparative Perspective.

Instructor(s): Martin J Powers (mpow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May be elected for credit more than once with permission of chair.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to help students understand artistic production in the context of human issues such as debates over the distribution of wealth, social privileges, or personal autonomy. In order to accomplish this we ask why a particular artifact looks the way it does: who made it? who acquired it? where was it placed and for what purpose? who decided what was acceptable and who, if anyone, challenged established styles of production? Specific topics include: royal patronage; monastic patronage; the evolution of an open market; the impact of art collecting and criticism on artistic style; competition between the court and the alternative markets; the evolution of an art "world"; the use of painting as a site for social and political debate. While the focus of class discussion will be the history of art production in China, readings in European art history will provide a comparative perspective. No previous knowledge of Chinese history is necessary. There will be a midterm quiz and a final paper. In addition, students will select a small portion of assigned readings for inclusion in an annotated bibliography. There is no textbook. Readings will be placed on reserve and or provided in course packs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 420 / AMCULT 432. National Identity in American Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and any prior coursework in history of art, American culture, or American history. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lecture/discussion course will reconsider the old question of "What's American about American Art?" by asking "when and why have people cared what's American about American Art." We will focus on a series of artistic movements from Colonial portraiture to the reception of Abstract Impressionism during the Cold War which artists, critics, historians, or their public have claimed were uniquely American or expressed a unified national culture. By studying related issues in political, social, and cultural history (which often reveal a nation that was anything but unified), we will examine how Americans have sought to define a national identity through art. Students who have done prior work in any aspect of art history, American history, American literature, or American culture and who are willing to do some background reading to fill in the gaps in their knowledge are encouraged to participate. This course will include at least on field trip to view original works of art and architecture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 440 / CLARCH 440. Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece.

Section 001 Urbanism in Mediterranean Architecture. Meets with Architecture 509.001.

Instructor(s): Lydia M Soo (lmsoo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/clarch/440/001.nsf

This course will adopt an anthropological approach to urbanism and the links between ecological settings, natural characteristics of the site, and architecture. It provides both historical and political contexts and illustrates the hold that Athens and Alexandria have had on the imagination through an exploration of the visual and literary arts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 473. Twentieth-Century Architecture.

Section 001 Meets with Architecture 543.001.

Instructor(s): Anatole Senkevitch Jr (senkanat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 102. (3). Rackham credit with additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/arch/543/001.nsf

The course offers a critical examination of the transformations in architectural theory and practice from the late 19th through the 20th century, with emphasis on elucidating the leadership struggles for definition, meaning, and form in the architecture of this period. Also considered is the link between theory and practice; the relationship between conceptual and aesthetic as well as technical factors; and the cultural, economic, social, and political context out of which they evolved.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 001 Histories of Art and Histories of Nations. (3 credits). Meets with History 481.002.

Instructor(s): Thomas Willette (willette@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (2-3). May be elected for a total of nine credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be conducted as a seminar on the historiography of "national art" in early modern and modern Europe, with emphasis on Germany and Italy in the period 1450-1945. We will consider how discourses of nationhood were articulated in works of art, as well as in historical writings about art, long before the age of nationalism. The comparative approach will allow us to observe how concepts of national identity are formed locally in a process of comparison and contrast with the peoples of other lands, and how works of art have served to create, document, and justify the distinctions of "nationality." From the 16th century to the 20th century, histories of art and histories of nations were often informed by the same philosophical premises and cultural attitudes regarding national character, language, physiognomy and political institutions, as well as similar assumptions about the determining roles of race, geography, and climate. Our point of departure will be the Germania of Tacitus, in which the "barbarian" northern tribes and the "civilized" ancient Romans were defined and characterized in ways that would shape cultural stereotypes about both Germans and Italians for centuries. We will then focus on Humanist historiography (including works of Petrarch, Leonardo Bruni, Conrad Celtis, and Heinrich Bebel) and the articulation of national histories in terms of collective cultural achievements. In this way, works of art (as highly crafted material objects invested with intrinsic merit) became linked to essential national attributes codified by ancient authorities. At the same time, art became material evidence for both the legitimacy and the political virtues of the nation state (such as republican Florence or the German empire of Maximilian I). The political ideas of "Italy" and "Germany" developed in the 18th and 19th centuries along with beliefs about national styles and characteristic subject matter. Hence the dark forests of German painting and the sun-lit pastoral landscapes of Italian art. In the period of romantic nationalism Albrecht Dürer came to embody the soul of Germany, while Raphael represented the ideal of Italy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 002 Primitivism: A Modern Project. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Jacqueline R Francis (jrfranci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (2-3). May be elected for a total of nine credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Primitivism has been a preoccupation of the modern artist and citizen in the West, and this course is an examination of how "the primitive" as a construction has been used in discussions about painting, sculpture, and graphic art from the eighteenth century to the present. Following the premise that "primitive" is best understood as a term that relies upon binary conceptions of high and low art, we'll consider its deployment across the social relations of gender, race, class, and ethnicity, and the historical grid of time and geography.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 003 Portraiture in Ancient Egypt. (1 credit). Meets with Institute for the Humanities 411.001 and ACABS 593.001. Meets Jan 28, 30, and Feb 4, 6, 11, 13, 18, and 20, 2002. (Drop/Add deadline=February 1).

Instructor(s): Lorelei Corcoran

Prerequisites: (2-3). May be elected for a total of nine credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Institute for the Humanities 411.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 004 Use and Reuse of the Past in Architecture: Antiquity-Medieval Period. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Alka A Patel (alkap@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (2-3). May be elected for a total of nine credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The re-use of building materials has been documented throughout various regions of the globe and in many time periods. This practice encompassed the recycling of all that was useable, from small architectural fragments to portions of standing buildings. Moreover, it could be suggested that reuse of the past did not refer strictly to the physical remains of bygone eras, but included the conceptual remains of these eras as well. In light of the "global" practice of salvaging older material and putting it to good use, focus on a single region and time period would be artificially limiting. Thus, this course will examine the phenomenon of using remnant building materials from Antiquity through the medieval period, roughly spanning the 1st through 15th centuries C.E. The regions covered will extend from the Iberian peninsula eastward to the Indian subcontinent. Among the issues raised by this approach and addressed in the course are:

  1. How was recyclable material generated, through willful destruction and/or the dilapidation of buildings?
  2. What are the differences between "imitation" of architectural styles and practices, and "re-use" of building ideas and concepts?
  3. Are the present-day interpretations of this historical practice signs of domination over a vanquished foe, or emulation of a much admired past harmonious with how these buildings were viewed at the time of their construction?

The course will be conducted in seminar format, requiring weekly participation, one presentation, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 005 The Fragment in Modern and Postmodern Culture. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Joseph C Grigely (jgrigely@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (2-3). May be elected for a total of nine credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about fragments and fragmentation unfinished poems, architectural ruins, and eclectic editorial processes and how these fragments and processes of inquiry have evolved as defining aspects of modern and postmodern culture. The disciplinary framework is a broad one, and includes art, architecture, and scientific thought since the early nineteenth century. Specific topics include: Keats and the English Romantic Elgin; editorial eclecticism as exemplified in both contemporary editorial theory and the history of eugenic thought; Weekly World News, the horse with the human face, and the editing of bodies; collage, bricolage, and decollage; and visual narratives in contemporary drawing. Essentially, the course examines how various cultural narratives are constructed from fragments, and how the fragment itself has evolved as a narrative entity. Many of the questions posed in class will not have immediate or straightforward answers. Instead, the questions we ask and explore will function in such a way as to expose tensions, contradictions, ironies, and aporias.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 534 / CLARCH 534. Ancient Painting.

Section 001 Ancient Monumental Painting.

Instructor(s): Elaine K Gazda (gazda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, HISTART 101, and either HISTART 221 or 222. (3). Rackham credit with additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the ancient civilizations of the greater Mediterranean region, large-scale paintings decorated the walls of palaces, houses, tombs and public buildings, often in celebration of their patrons' lives, achievements, and cultivated tastes. Especially prized were painted wood panels. Some were kept in special cabinets and shown only to special guests. Others, like Fayoum portraits, commemorated the deceased in life and accompanied them to the eternal world of the grave.

After a very brief introduction to the traditions of monumental painting developed by the ancient cultures of the Mediterranean world, this course will focus on the wall and panel paintings of the Roman era. Paintings from Rome, Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Ostia provide the core of visual material along with paintings from the Roman provinces. The course will pay special attention to the meaning of various subjects in light of their patrons' social concerns and contexts. These include (but are not limited to) images of gods and goddesses, heroes and heroines, mortal men and women, children and slaves; daily, religious, and political life; landscapes, gardens and still life. Class discussion will take account of a number of overarching problems in the study of Roman painting such as the derivation of Roman imagery from Greek models, the validity of the four Pompeian styles as a 'scientific' tool, and the reception of Roman paintings in modern times. Students will learn about the technical processes of Roman wall painting as well as the problems and methods of reconstruction and interpretation by studying actual fragments of Roman painting in special sessions at the Kelsey Museum.

Readings for twice weekly class discussions and lectures will be drawn from R. Ling, Roman Painting (1991) and a course pack. An in-class report and short (3-4 page) paper to be prepared during the first half of the term will be followed by a 10-page research paper in the second half. Midterm and final examinations will be based on slide attributions and essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 565. Early Modern Architecture in Italy, Austria, and Germany.

Section 001 Baroque Architecture. Meets with Architecture 528. Prerequisite: Arch 323 or permission of instructor.

Instructor(s): Lydia M Soo (lmsoo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/arch/528/001.nsf

The course examines the architecture of the Baroque period: the buildings and cities of the late 16th to the mid-18th centuries in Italy, France, England, and Central Europe. They will be discussed in relationship to contemporary theoretical writings, addressing issues of function, structure, and beauty, as well as in relationship to the cultural context of the Baroque period, including philosophical, religious, political, economic, and environmental factors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 575. Mass Media and the Visual Arts.

Section 001 Exhibition Prosthetics.

Instructor(s): Joseph C Grigely (jgrigely@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 102 or 272. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores the range of printed materials that serve a prosthetic function in relation to the making and exhibiting of art: catalogues, press releases, exhibition announcements, biographies, and even wall labels. During the course of the academic term we also will look closely at how various related 'professional' activities (which range from exhibition grant proposals to preparing portfolios to hanging out with artists and curators in bars) have a central, and not peripheral, role in relation to contemporary exhibition practices. While the course is experimental and practical, it also explores conceptual issues underpinning the relationship between curatorial and creative practice. The final project for the course will involve producing either a formal curatorial proposal or a virtual exhibition consisting of exhibition announcement, press release, catalogue dummy, and checklist of 'work'. The course is open to both graduate students interested in curating across many historical periods, as well as MFA students interested in the ways exhibitions create contexts for their work, and how they might participate in the construction of these contexts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 617. Visual Valence: Case Explorations in the Critical Analysis of Material Culture.

Section 001 Seals and Sealing Practices: Cross-temporal Case Studies in Analysis.

Instructor(s): Margaret C Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Seals have been crucial tools of social and aesthetic agency since prehistoric times. This seminar offers an opportunity to learn about seals (and about the analytical methodologies most effectively used in this process) as cultural artifacts and as evidence of social and aesthetic practice. An introductory unit of readings, hands-on work, and discussions lays the methodological groundwork with reference to issues in the study of seals and sealing practices in the ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome. From there, students will be invited to work with particular seal artifacts or seal impressions of their choosing from a large number of established options in University of Michigan Collections (including but not limited to the Kelsey Museum's extensive holdings). Selections may range across the entire spectrum of rich possibilities here from the prehistoric Near East to phases of the modern across a diverse range of cultures.

The culminating work product of the term will be the group's creation of an interactive website in which individual projects weave into the larger whole. Training in website production will be part of the course; but students already skilled in this area will be valued members of the team.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 642. Problems in Byzantine Art.

Section 001 Early Icons.

Instructor(s): Thelma K Thomas (tkthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Scholars have proposed several possible origins for Byzantine icons, the sacred images of orthodox Christian devotions. Typically, the proposed theological influences for both icons and iconoclasm lie within monotheistic religious traditions. Proposals for artistic traditions instrumental to the development of Byzantine icons, however, include not only early Christian portraits and images represented on a wide range of relics and pilgrims' souvenirs, but also sacred images in the service of polytheistic cult traditions Roman imperial portraiture, the genre of Egyptian mummy portraits painted on shrouds and wooden panels and, most recently, Roman-period pagan icons. This course will survey trends in the scholarly literature, assess the variety of approaches, and undertake case studies of selected early icons, paying special attention to examples with documented archaeological contexts. In addition to participation in class discussions, each student will be required to present and lead a discussion of an assigned reading, report on the progress of his/her own research project, and write a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 666. Problems in 17th Century Art and Visual Culture.

Section 001 Gender and Allegory in Northern European Art.

Instructor(s): Sarah Cohen

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar addresses the extensive use of allegory and personification in Northern European art from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, and considers the diverse and conflicting ways in which male and female figures were used to enact these allegories. Drawing upon contemporary theories of the construction of gender through performance and other outward bodily signs, we will examine the ways in which such social constructions intersected with the work of allegory and personification to build multiple levels of meaning within figural art. Themes and artists to be considered include: Ruben's use of gender and allegory; personifications of feminine sexual power in German art of the sixteenth century; and uses of allegory by both men and women to project authority within the French court. For special cases studies will also draw upon the exhibition "Women at the Top: Images of Female Power, 1500-1650" at the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 700. Independent Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Approval of graduate advisor. Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for individualized student non-thesis research under under the supervision of History of Art faculty. Must be arranged with the faculty member and approved by the program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 772. Problems in Modern Art.

Section 001 The Artist as Producer.

Instructor(s): Maria E Gough (mgough@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The great question that resonates throughout the theory and practice of politically progressive Russian and German artists and thinkers in the 1920s and 1930s is this: is it still possible, within the newly reconfigured social relations of production brought by revolution, to be an artist? If so, how is the role of the leftist artist to be defined? We will begin with Walter Benjamin's attempt to theorize this problem in his materialist essays of the 1930s, and then work our way back through the theoretical and artistic sources upon which he draws. This will involve our exploration of various Russian, Soviet, and Weimar German models of artistic production which attempted to think through the dialectic that has underpinned modernist thought since the 1830s that of fragmentation and totality but with regard now to a materialist conception of the artist as producer. We will study, for example, the Constructivist, productivist, and factographic work of Rodchenko et al., the montage practices of Vertov, Eisenstein, and Heartfield, the reportage and operativist theories of literary production advocated by Tret'iakov and others in the journal LEF and elsewhere, and finally, Brecht's concept of refunctioning the radio theater. We will also read selections from Benjamin's coorespondence with Adorno in the mid 1930's.

Having established the theoretical and artistic contexts informing Benjamin's materialist criticism, we will move forward to consider, in the second half of the academic term, contemporary artists who have framed their own work in dialogue with the major debates of the 1920s and 1930s. In particular, we will focus on the emergence of new forms of documentary practice in the last three decades: the critical use of photography in Sekula's Fish Story (1995); Rosler's video work, especially Semiotics of the Kitchen (1975) and Born to be Sold: Martha Rosler Reads the Strange Case of Baby S/M (1988); and the appropriation of television images and found footage both in Birnbaum's early Technology/Transformation: Wonder Women (1978) and also, more recently, in Grimonprez' Kobarweng (1992) and Dial H.I.S.T.O.R.Y (1997).

Since the principle of montage is clearly no longer the exclusive province of progressive artists, but is instead now widely deployed in the mainstream of mass media and advertising, the seminar will provide an opportunity in which to reassess the current fate of two major claims made in the theoretical debates of the early century: first, the political efficacy of artistic interventions into the new media technologies, and second, the political efficacy of montage as a radical tool for the (re)writing of history.

Open to all graduate students in all disciplines (and, with the permission of the instructor, to advanced undergraduates with a demonstrable interest in the subject).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Undergraduates require permission of instructor

HISTART 820 / CLARCH 820. Approaches to Archaeological Field Survey.

Section 001 Approaches to Archaeological Field Survey

Instructor(s): John F Cherry (jcherry@umich.edu) , Susan E Alcock (salcock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 820.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


Undergraduate Course Listings for HISTART.


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