College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Linguistics


This page was created at 4:39 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Linguistics
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for LING

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Linguistics.


LING 408 / ENGLISH 408. Varieties of English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 408.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

LING 447 / PSYCH 445. Psychology of Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Psych. 340. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/psych/445/001.nsf

See Psychology 445.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

LING 461 / ANTHRCUL 461 / AMCULT 461. Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek (bameek@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 461.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

LING 505. Rhetoric.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey G Heath (jheath@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; qualitified undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The objective is to understand how "rhetors" such as political leaders use language and visual imagery to impress, influence, and persuade a general public. Primary objects of analysis are speeches and debates. We show how successful rhetorical events tap into collective memories of prior events (literary and historical). We begin with the ancient world (Cicero, the Iliad), then consider a chronological sequence of American speeches from Washington to the present. Orations by Lincoln and M.L. King, Jr., are studied in cultural and political context. Debates from Lincoln-Douglas to Gore-Perot are then analysed, followed by brief coverage of modern political advertising. Shakespearean battlefield oratory, and academic polemic, also are worked in. Aristotle and Cicero, with help from Robert Hariman ("Political Styles") and Kenneth Burke, provide a partial theoretical grounding, but the emphasis is on open-ended textual analysis rather than on philosophical reflection. Open to undergraduates with instructor's permission.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Open to undergraduates with instructor's permission.

LING 513. Phonology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): San Duanmu (duanmu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Ling. 313. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/ling/513/001.nsf

Phonology studies the sound system of human languages. This course introduces the fundamental concepts in phonology. Topics include distinctive features, phonological rules, prosodic structure (syllable, stress, tone, intonation), multi-tiered phonology, feature geometry, underspecification, and Optimality Theory. Both theory and problem-solving ability will be emphasized. Besides readings for class, weekly exercises constitute an important part of the course. In addition, there is a final project on a selected topic.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 313 or 512, or permission of the instructor.

Requirements:

  • Problem sets:60%
  • Final project:40%
    • Abstract 5%
    • Draft 10%
    • Presentation 10%
    • Final paper 15%

The final project can be on any phonological topic of your own choice. The topic should be selected at least four weeks before the end of classes. An abstract is due at least two weeks before the end of classes. Every student is expected to give a short presentation (10 minutes or so) of your final project towards the end of the course.

All assignments should be handed in on time; late ones will either get a lower grade or no grade.

Textbooks:
Required: Carlos Gussenhoven. 1998. Understanding phonology. Oxford University Press. Available at Shaman Drum bookstore. textbook@shamandrum.com
Recommended: Michael Kenstowicz. 1994. Phonology in generative grammar. Blackwell. (This is a more advanced textbook).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 514. Semantics and Pragmatics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter Hallman (hallman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Ling. 314. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/ling/514/001.nsf

This course introduces three tools for semantic analysis, their relation to current issues in semantic theory, and their relation to an overall picture of what meaning is and how it is encoded in natural language. The three tools are: predicate and propositional logic, generalized quantifier theory, and type theory. These tools are couched in the truth-functional approach to what meaning is, according to which language is basically classificational linguistic expressions (words, predicates, sentences) serve to classify reality into what is the case and what isn't the case.

With these tools, we will explore current issues in semantics including the relation between syntax and semantics (compositionality), the scope of quantifiers, quantifier types, monotonicity, conservativity, presuppositionality, intensionality, event types, and types of anaphora.

Textbook: Introduction to Natural Language Semantics by Henriette de Swart. CSLI Publications, Stanford, California, 1998. ISBN 1-57586-138-0.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 518. Linguistic Typology.

Section 001 Meets with Linguistics 318.001.

Instructor(s): Peter E Hook (pehook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; undergraduates with permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Ling. 318. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~pehook/lingw97.html

Human languages, especially those spoken by members of unfamiliar and distant cultures, appear on the surface to be very different from one another. But closer examination reveals that languages differ in systematic ways and that more than half of them can be divided into a relatively small number of basic types. In this course we will identify and study some of these basic patterns and explore possible reasons for their existence, seeking explanations where possible in the communicative function of language as well as in the historical evolution of languages. The course will introduce students to basic grammatical structure and function by (1) having them investigate unfamiliar languages through study of published descriptive grammars and (2) relating this direct experience to the principle findings of contemporary typological research.

Coursework will consist of:

  1. readings and lectures on the major categories and parameters which are used to define language types,
  2. the completion of a number of short assignments or reports on given phenomena as they are manifested in the languages that students will adopt,
  3. discussion and comparison of these individual findings in class,
  4. a midterm exam, and
  5. a course paper examining a particular typological parameter in one or more languages.

Toward the end of the course students will make a ten minute oral presentation to the class of a pre-final version of their term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 542 / ANTHRCUL 572. Introduction to Sociolinguistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ann Lesley Milroy (amilroy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Ling. 514 or graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will be introduced to methods of studying the relationships between language variation and social structure and to the major findings of sociolinguists who have examined these relationships. The course will focus largely (but not exclusively) on the quantitative methods developed by Labov, which are designed to reveal the way language change is rooted in synchronic variation. Socially sensitive models of language change will be considered. The course will study reports of research which focus variously on everyday social interaction, on larger scale patterns of social dialect variation, and on patterns of code choice in bidialectal and bilingual communities. Relationships between language and social class, language and gender, and language and ethnicity will be discussed. Others topics covered will be language and style and larger scale social, educational, and political issues associated with the process of language standardization. All students will carry out a small-scale piece of original sociolinguistic research and will be offered the opportunity to contribute to projects currently in progress in Detroit area speech communities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 551. Second Language Acquisition.

Section 001 Meets with Linguistic 351.001.

Instructor(s): Judy A Dyer (jdyer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/ling/351/001.nsf

This introductory course will focus on theories of second language acquisition and how they relate to second language development and teaching. The course will cover some of the major topics within second language acquisition research and will provide students with experience in data analysis and interpretation. While much of the literature focuses on the acquisition of English, examples and analysis of other language data will be discussed. The course is intended for all students interested in understanding and evaluating proposed models of second language acquisition.

Undergraduates should register for Linguistics 351 and graduates for 551. Both courses will meet together with additional work for 551 credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 612. Advanced Phonetics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jose R Benki (benki@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Ling. 512. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an advanced graduate class in acoustic and auditory phonetics, and the application of phonetic results to phonological theory. We will focus on articulatory/acoustic relations and acoustic/perceptual relations. The first of these concerns human vocal tracts as related to the sounds that they make; the second involves the physical characteristics of these sounds as related to their linguistic percept. Techniques for studying speech in these different domains will be covered, including articulatory modeling, LPC analysis, cepstral analysis, speech synthesis, and psychoacoustic modeling. Lab sessions and exercises will familiarize students with these methods in both speech production and perception experiments. In the final part of the course we will critically examine recent efforts to relate the physical realities of speech production and perception to the structure of phonological systems. Prerequisite: Linguistics 512.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 615. Advanced Syntax.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Samuel D Epstein (sepstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Ling. 515 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A second term graduate level course in Syntactic theory. The intent is to move beyond the introductory-text level, begin reading primary literature critically, undertake research, and extend knowledge of the Government-Binding theory sufficient to initiate an informed preliminary investigation of the motivations for and overall design features of the Minimalist Program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 002 Montana Salish. Meets with Ling 492.002.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar focuses on Montana Salish, one of about two dozen languages of the Salishan language family of the Pacific Northwest (Washington, Oregon, British Columbia, Idaho, Montana). These languages, all of them gravely endangered, have structural features that are unusual in the world's languages, notably consonant clusters as long as eight consonants, pharyngeal consonants, lexical suffixes, very elaborate verbal morphology, and a weak lexical distinction between nouns and verbs. The course will begin with introductory lectures on the phonetics, phonology, morphology, and syntax of Montana Salish, and continue with translation and analysis of texts. Students, working either alone or in groups, will prepare a term paper on some aspect of Salish structure. The term paper will count for half of the course grade; the other half of the grade will be based on active participation in class discussions, including in-class presentations on students' research projects. Ideally, the students in this seminar will have had at least one course in phonetics or phonology and one course in syntax; interested students without this background should consult the instructor before enrolling. There is no textbook for the course. Assigned readings will include the instructor's draft grammar lessons and articles from the scholarly literature on this and other Salishan languages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 004 Formal and Stochastic Research Methods.

Instructor(s): Acrisio M Pires (pires@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course presents and discusses rule-based/symbolic and statistical/stochastic approaches to linguistics and computational linguistics (see description of LING 492.004 for a definition of the latter); evaluating some of their individual contributions to the field and how they can be combined with different purposes in natural language processing (NLP). I will spend some time covering basic concepts/techniques necessary for students to understand the more advanced material. Some of the topics covered will be lexical analysis, corpora tagging, morphological and syntactic parsing/analysis, semantic analysis and a couple of NLP applications, including information extraction/retrieval, machine translation and, to a lesser extent, language recognition/generation. No previous training in computational linguistics is required. The coursebook will be used mostly as a source of information on the basic concepts/techniques, and other readings should be assigned during the academic term.

Coursebook:
Jurafsky, D. and J. H. Martin. 2000. Speech and Language Processing: An Introduction to Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics and Speech Recognition. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 005 Language & Socialization. Meets with Anthro 458.002, Psych 551.244, Ling 492.005.

Instructor(s): Barbara A Meek (bameek@umich.edu) , Marilyn J Shatz (mshatz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 458.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 006 Seminar in Psycholinguistics. Imaging Language: Psycholinguistics meets Neuroscience. Meets with Psychology 808.002.

Instructor(s): Julie E Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will read the latest research on how the normal brain processes language, drawing primarily upon neuroscience paradigms such as ERP, fMRI, and PET. Some research using aphasic patients also may be covered, depending on student interest. Meeting time is flexible; interested students should contact the instructor with their time constraints. This course is designed for graduate students with some background in either psycholinguistics or neuroscience. We will meet once a week for three hours. Grades will be based upon discussion, student presentations, and a term paper. I anticipate having several guest speakers from the UM community to discuss their current work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: Instructor Permission

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 008 Introduction to the Sociolinguistics of German. Meets with German 861.001.

Instructor(s): Robin M Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/german/861/001.nsf

See German 861.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 801. Seminar on Graduate Study.

Section 001 History of the Modern Field of Linguistics: the Past 30 years. (1 Credits)

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-2).

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar has three goals. The first is to introduce students to the history of the modern field of linguistics. In the Fall Term we will focus on readings and discussions that will take us from 19th-century linguistics through the Chomskyan revolution of the 1960s. In the Winter Term we will concentrate on the past 30 years of (mostly American) linguistics. The second goal is to begin to develop an understanding of the diverse approaches to the study of linguistics and an appreciation for the relations among these different approaches. Thus the course also serves as a forum where students can discuss how the various aspects of their coursework fit together. These two goals converge in helping us to build an integrated view of the discipline. The third goal is specific to the first-year students in the Department of Linguistics: the seminar will orient these students to graduate study in linguistics in the Department, and at the university, and to consider first-year students' long-term goals relative to the course of study they are embarking on. Throughout the year, many of our discussions will be led by linguistics faculty with expertise in specific topics to be covered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 815. Seminar: Syntax.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Samuel D Epstein (sepstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Previous course in syntax. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will examine fundamental aspects of the principles and parameters theory and certain extensions of the so-called Government-Binding Theory as couched within the Minimalist Program. Certain central aspects of the Minimalist Program, directly resulting from empirical and/or explanatory problems confronting GB theory, will be presented. Fundamental differences between Principle-based and Rule-based systems will be discussed with respect to the particular topics covered, one of which will be the motivation for this shift in focus from principle based to rule-based systems. Course requirements: a commitment to, but healthy distrust of, theoretical simplification, a presentation of an independently researched topic, and a final paper indicating mastery of the central analyses of the primary literature reported upon, as well as the student's ideas (including questions) regarding the empirical and conceptual content of the analyses addressed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 842 / GERMAN 861. Seminar in Sociolinguistics.

Section 001 Introduction to the Sociolinguistics of German.

Instructor(s): Robin M Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/german/861/001.nsf

See German 861.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 997. Special Research I and II.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a graduate-level independent research course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


Undergraduate Course Listings for LING.


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