College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Political Science


This page was created at 4:43 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Political Science
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for POLSCI

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Political Science.


POLSCI 401. Development of Political Thought: Modern and Recent.

Section 001 History of Political Thought from Hobbes through Nietzsche.

Instructor(s): Arlene W Saxonhouse (awsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing or two courses in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey the history of political thought from Hobbes through Nietzsche. We will focus on changing conceptions of the purpose of political society, the origins of political authority, the nature and value of political participation, and the nature of liberty and equality through intensive reading of the primary texts of Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Burke, John Stuart Mill, and Marx. Brief selections from other authors will be included. All readings will be from the original works. There are no secondary textbooks for this class. Two meetings per week will be devoted to lectures and discussion. The course will divide up and meet in one hour of discussion sections as well. There will be one in-class midterm examination, two brief papers, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 402. Selected Topics in Political Theory.

Section 001 Twentieth-Century Political Theory.

Instructor(s): Anne M Manuel

Prerequisites: Pol. Sci. 101 or 400 or 401. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/polsci/402/001.nsf

This class will examine six different themes in contemporary political theory: liberalism, Marxism, feminism, race/post-colonialism, consumerism, and ethics. On each theme we will look at an older, roughly early twentieth-century text by a well-known theorist, and at a recently published, late twentieth-century text by a theorist engaged with the older text. This two-pronged approach will allow us to consider both questions of substance namely, what contemporary political theory is as well as questions of method namely, how contemporary political theory is done today. In addition to the theoretical readings, we will read one novel, Thomas Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49, and see one film, "Scottsboro: An American Tragedy," to help illuminate the themes we will explore. Be forewarned that this course has a heavy reading load and some of the reading will be difficult. The assignments will consist of take-home essays and some group work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 411. American Political Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arthur Lupia (lupia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Any 100-level course in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lupia/ps681.pdf

In this course students have an opportunity to acquire a range of skills that are imperative to the making and evaluation of political decisions in particular, and public policy in general. The skills students will acquire include:

  1. Identifying and constructing persuasive political and policy arguments,
  2. A basic understanding of microeconomics, with special emphasis on how taxes, subsidies and other government actions affect the relationship between supply and demand,
  3. A basic understanding of how individual preferences interact with electoral and legislative institutions to affect political decision making,
  4. Understanding the conditions under which policies are implemented and enforced as their sponsors intend, and,
  5. Serving on a debate team that is responsible for constructing and defending an argument on a current political or policy topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 412. Courts, Politics and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Noga Morag-Levine (noga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The American judicial process its structure, logic, and myriad legal and political functions is the central focus of this course. We will begin the academic term with an analysis of the role of courts in three policy domains: the management of disputes; criminal punishment; and implementation of social and institutional reform. We will subsequently explore those elements that distinguish courts from other political institutions through an examination of the nature of judicial reasoning and the choices and constraints that shape decisionmaking in this context. The term will conclude with a discussion of the origins and consequences of cross-national differences in the propensity of citizens and interest groups to take their disputes to court.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 414. The Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Francene M Engel (fengel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. (3). May be repeated twice, for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course is concerned with civil rights and civil liberties in the American constitutional system. It will focus on decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court, but will also draw on literature from other sources. The primary substantive aim of the course is to help students develop a theoretically informed understanding of civil liberties and of the institutional devices for enforcing them. Additional aims include helping students to read and criticize political texts, to assess constitutional arguments, and to think and write more rigorously. Some of the topics that will be discussed include racial discrimination, rights to privacy, free speech, religious freedom, and rights of the accused, as well as others. Students are expected to have read assignments before class and to be prepared to discuss them. Students also will be expected to participate in a moot court exercise. Methods of instruction: lecture (3 hours) and discussion section (1 hour); you must register for both the lecture and discussion section. A basic understanding of American institutional politics and American history is assumed. Some exposure to political theory is helpful, but not required.

Text: American Constitutional Law. Louis Fisher. ISBN:0-89089-759-X.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 415. The American Chief Executive.

Section 001 The American Presidency.

Instructor(s): Scott Curtis James

Prerequisites: Pol. Sci. 111, 410, or 411; or junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/polsci/415/001.nsf

This course is an inquiry into the origins, structure, and operation of the modern American presidency. Its purpose is to familiarize students with the concepts and issues at the center of contemporary political science scholarship on the presidency. Three normative concerns broadly guide the organization of this course: First, generally speaking, do Americans get the kind of president they want? Put differently, what are the qualities we expect our presidents to possess in office and how successfully do our electoral institutions select for such individuals? Second, what are the determinants of effective presidential leadership? That is to say, why are some presidents more successful than others at exerting their influence over the governing process? And third, what is the proper role of the presidency in the contemporary American political system? Are the powers of the presidency adequate to the tasks expected of presidents? Does the growth of presidential power present a challenge to traditional notions of republican government? We will begin with an examination of the constitutional origins of the presidency. What role did the Framers intend the president to play in the American political system, and to what extent did the early presidency conform to these expectations? Subsequent weeks will focus on the nature of the modern presidency. Topics will include presidential selection, the elements of presidential power and authority, the presidency and the party system, and the institutional presidency.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 417. Legislative Process.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey L Bernstein

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses primarily on the U.S. Congress. We will look at congressional elections, congressional procedures and the policies they generate, and how Congress relates to the other branches of government. Congress' members must make laws for the nation as a whole, but also must represent the narrow, parochial interests of their districts. We will pay much attention this term to questions about how Congress manages to make responsible policies while remaining responsive to the electorate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 419 / CAAS 418. Black Americans and the Political System.

Section 001 Black Americans & the Political System.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science; CAAS 201 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors and creators and initiators in the political process. The course will focus upon the inputs, the responses of the decision makers, and the outputs in terms the political process. Finally, the various controversies will be explored and analyzed in regard to African American politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 420 / COMM 484. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas A Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 484.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 444. Government and Politics of Russia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Is Russian democracy an oxymoron (like postal service) or a genuine possibility? This course focuses primarily on the evolution of political processes and institutions since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 in order, primarily, to address that question. The course covers the political economy of the transition from the Soviet system, voting and other forms of political participation, the role of external actors inluding the United States and various NGOs and IGOs, relations between Moscow and Russia's regions, and high politics in a strongly presidential system.

All students will have the same assignments. Students will write a book review, a short op ed piece for the New York Times, and a term paper. In doing the latter, students are strongly encouraged, though not required, to do collaborative papers and to use one or more of several data sets about Russian attitudes that I will provide (I and the teaching assistant will provide assistance in learning the basics of data analysis.) There will be an in-class midterm, and a take-home final distributed on the last day of classes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 457. Governments and Politics of India and South Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ashutosh Varshney (varshney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/polsci/457/001.nsf

This course is primarily, though not entirely, intended for juniors and seniors. (Graduate students seeking specialization in South Asian politics and political economy are also welcome. Their requirements, predictably, will be different from those for the undergraduates.)

India has a long history, and its chronicle of many achievements coexists with a record of many unresolved problems. With a primary focus on the 20th century, this course concentrates on four crucial aspects of the "Indian experience." First, however, we will start with a brief overview of Indian history, concentrating on those periods that have a significant bearing on modern Indian politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 460. Problems in World Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul K Huth (phuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). May be elected for credit twice with permission of the instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/polsci/460/001.nsf

In this course we will address a range of issues which confront state leaders as they seek to ensure their country's national security. Special attention will be given to enduring problems of conflict over disputed territory, deterring potential adversaries from using military force, and maintining domestic political support while seeking peace with international adversaries. The course will be conducted largely as a lecture. Students will be graded on the basis of in-class exams and one paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 468. Cooperation and Conflict in the International System.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Douglas W Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We begin by discussing what the international system is, consider the possibility of multiple international systems, and describe some of the history of the modern international system(s). We then turn to consideration of patterns of cooperation and of conflict within the system. We will seek to understand why it is that some members of the system can cooperate in rather remarkable ways, while at other times overt conflict erupts. When discussing cooperation we will pay close attention to arguments about why international cooperation should be especially hard to achieve, and will speculate on ways to overcome these difficulties. Students will be awarded grades based on their performance in two exams and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 469. Politics of International Economic Relations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jude C Hays (jchays@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Pol. Sci. 160. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/polsci/469/001.nsf

With the end of the Cold War and the acceleration of international economic integration, political scientists interested in international relations have increasingly turned their attention to the politics of global trade and finance. This area of study, known as international political economy (or simply IPE), focuses on the familiar connections between power and wealth, states and markets, and economics and politics in order to gain a better understanding of the political underpinnings of the global economy as well as the influences that international economics has on national and international politics. Are free trade and multipolarity compatible? Does economic globalization undermine democracy and popular sovereignty? Along these lines, an important focus of this course is whether the institutions that currently govern international economic activity are robust enough to survive important political and economic changes that are currently taking place in the world. For example, we will consider whether the domestic political coalitions that have traditionally supported free trade are breaking up as a result of increased international capital mobility and whether the international cooperation necessary to manage the global economy can survive significant changes in the international distribution of power.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 471. The American Foreign Policy Process.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin Edwards

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/polsci/471/001.nsf

The end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union present the U.S. with dramatically new challenges. These challenges take two forms. First, the traditional agendas of U.S. policy with regard to specific regions have been drastically altered. Second, new issues have come to the fore, demanding attention from both the academic and policymaking communities. How are we to make sense of these changes? How are we to develop policies to deal with them? This course will offer an introduction to a number of these issues. Our goals are as follows:

  1. to understand the historical roots of US foreign relations,
  2. to appreciate the complexities of policy making in a democracy,
  3. to engage a number of present-day policy debates and issues, and
  4. to make good oral and written arguments using theoretical insights and historical evidence.

The syllabus is divided into three parts. The first part of the course is a historical look at the conduct of U.S. Foreign Policy, which is essential to fully understanding the present predicament. The second part of the course focuses on the process of foreign policy making. The final section of the course addresses traditional tools of influence and contemporary issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 478. Political Economy of Transition.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John E Jackson (jjacksn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/polsci/478/001.nsf

The major theme of the course is to examine the joint processes of political and economic transformation. Successful transitions are largely evolutionary. New organizations and institutions arise to replace older, outmoded forms of production and governance. The course will compare and contrast different types of institutional arrangements. Most of the course will be devoted to examining a series of countries and regions that have chosen or been forced into some form of economic and political transition. The examples will include countries moving from centrally planned economies and one-party authoritarian governments to a market economy and democratic governments; developed democracies needing to transform their own economies in the face of global competition and new technologies; and developing countries trying to move away from resource-based economies or to overcome the devastation of local conflicts. Readings include writing by Schumpeter, Krugman, Elster, Przeworski, Kornai, Sachs, Hellman, and Wade, among others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 483. American Political Parties and Electoral Problems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites: Poli. Sci. 111, 140, 410, or 411. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this class we seek a broad understanding of what the American political parties are, how they operate and how they evolved, and how they compare to parties in other countries. We will study them mainly in the context of presidential and congressional elections, although we will also consider local parties, party organization, and parties in legislatures. Students will be expected to read assigned books and articles and be prepared to discuss the material. Lecture and discussion will be the format.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 001 Introduction to Political Economy. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Robert J Franzese Jr (franzese@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~franzese/SyllabiEtc.html

The course explores the intersection of politics and economics, the impact of politics on the economy, and of the economy on politics. We approach this broad subject matter positively as opposed to normatively. That is, we seek to ascertain empirically and to understand theoretically certain systematic relationships between several key features of the socio-politico-economic environment, rather than to comment on the justness of those relationships. For example, does the periodicity of elections induce cycles in economic policy and perhaps thereby outcomes, and, if so, how, and how might such cycles vary across democracies or over time?

The course proceeds via an in-depth reading of six classic or recent books spanning the substantive realm of political economy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 002 The Politics of Fascism and Right-Wing Movements. (3 credits). Meets with German 493.001.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 493.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 003 Political Parties with the EU. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Anton Pelinka

Prerequisites: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The seminar will focus on the party system of the European Union. The growing importance of the European Parliament and the general development of the European integration led already to the formation of transnational European Parties and a European Party System.

The following topics will be especially discussed in the seminar:

  • The role of party groups in the European Parliament
  • The two major groups: The conservative "European People's Party" and the "Party of European Socialists"
  • Additional, less main stream groups like the Green Group in the EP
  • The role of parties which are opposing the European integration out of principle reasons (especially of the extreme right and left).

The following questions will be especially raised:

  • Is there an inbuilt conflict between national interests, which the parties have to follow even on the European level, and European interests?
  • Is there a basic "grand coalition" between the two major party groups, on which the past and future development of the EU is built?
  • Are there specific carreer patterns within the European party groups?
  • What are the factors which are influencing party discipline in the European Parliament?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 490. Game Theory and Formal Models.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth W Kollman (kkollman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the use of game theory in political science. Game theory is the study of mathematical models of conflict and cooperation between rational decision makers. The course will emphasize the fundamental assumptions behind game theory models of politics and will expose students to models of legislatures, voting and elections, international relations, and political participation. Students should have a useful facility with algebra before taking the course.

Course requirements include homework, two midterms and a paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 512 / SOC 512. Practicum in Survey Research.

Section 001 Detroit Area Study. Meets with NRE 501.042.

Instructor(s): Michael Couper

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/512/001.nsf

See Sociology 512.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 529 / PUBPOL 529. Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Chamberlin (johnch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in calculus or concurrent enrollment in Math. 413, and permission of instructor. Previous coursework in statistics is not required. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/pubpol/529/001.nsf

See Public Policy 529.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 592. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): , Helen Graves (hmgraves@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 603. Modern Political Thought.

Section 001 Modern Political Theory from Hobbes to Sorel.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth R Wingrove (ewingrov@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Selected readings in modern political theory from Hobbes to Sorel. We will begin with a text by Nietzsche, whose anti-enlightenment critique serves to introduce the analytic questions and thematic concerns that thread through the course. Readings are drawn from, among others, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, Marx.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 617. Proseminar in Legislative Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard L Hall (rlhall@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is intended for Ph.D. students in the social sciences interested in legislative behavior and institutions. We will focus heavily on the literature on the U.S. Congress, which is the focus of most of the theoretical scholarship. This is an intensive critical reading course. We also will discuss research ideas, design, data, and methods, and the main written assignment will be a research design. Prerequisite: POLSCI 611.

Texts:

  • Positive Theories of Congressional Institutions. Kenneth Shepsle & Barry Weingast, eds. ISBN: 0472083198. Michigan.
  • Turning the Legislative Thumbscrew. Douglas Dion. ISBN: 0472108204. Michigan.
  • The Concept of Representation. Hannah Pitkin. ISBN: 0520021568. Univ. of California.
  • Legislative Leviathan. Gary Cox and Matthew McCubbins. ISBN: 0520072200. Univ. of California.
  • Information and Legislative Organization. Keith Krehbiel. ISBN: 0472064606. Michigan.
  • Congressional Procedures and the Policy Process. Walter Oleszek. ISBN: 1568024487. CQ Press.
  • Delegating Powers. David Epstein and Sharyn O'Halloran. ISBN: 052166960X. Cambridge.
  • Home Style. Richard F. Fenno, Jr. ISBN: 0673394409. Addison-Wesley.
  • Outside Lobbying. Ken Kollman. ISBN: 0691017417. Princeton.
  • Turf Wars. David C. King. ISBN: 0226436241. Chicago.
  • Gaining Access. John Mark Hansen. ISBN: 0226315568. Chicago.
  • Pivotal Politics. Keith Krehbiel. ISBN: 0226452727. Chicago.
  • Race, Redistricting, and Representation. David Canon. ISBN: 0226092712. Chicago.
  • The Logic of Congressional Action. R. Douglas Arnold. ISBN: 0300056591. Yale Univ.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 620 / COMM 620. Research in Politics and the Mass Media.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael W Traugott (mtrau@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/620/001.nsf

The purpose of the seminar is to introduce students to the research literature in several selected areas of the general field of politics and the mass media. There is an emphasis on electoral politics and public opinion, but other topics are covered as well. The course begins with a consideration of how the news is made. Having developed this understanding, we move on to consider how elites craft communication strategies in order to influence other elites and the public. The last part of the course focuses on the ways the public is affected by these strategies. New research on group centered political strategies, new communication technologies, and social capital will be discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 625. Proseminar in Intergovernmental Relations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


POLSCI 638 / PUBPOL 638. Field Training.

Section 001 Integrated Policy Exercise. (1 credit). Meets January 7-11, 2002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). May be elected for credit twice.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/pubpol/638/001.nsf

See Public Policy 638.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 647. Proseminar in Comparative Elite Analysis.

Section 001 Executive Leadership in Western Democracies.

Instructor(s): Martin Thunert

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about Executive Leadership in Western Democracies. Please see the Political Science website http://polisci.lsa.umich.edu/ for more information about this course and the professor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 655. Proseminar in Japanese Politics.

Section 001 Japan from the Viewpoint of Comparative Politics.

Instructor(s): John C Campbell

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. No prior knowledge of Japan is assumed. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Provides an overview of Japanese political behavior, processes and institutions; focuses on such areas as the government role in the economy, the alleged immobilism of decision-making, cultural vs. both institutional and rational-choice explanations of political phenomena, how Japan fits into the development of welfare states, and conflict-management in U.S.-Japan relations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 659 / CAAS 651. Proseminar in Governments and Politics of Africa.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer A Widner (jwidner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jwidner/ps659.html

This seminar explores important debates in the study of African politics, introducing the "canon" or conventional wisdom as well as new perspectives. Practical research problems as well as substantive issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 666. International Political Economy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jude Collin Hays (jchays@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Pol. Sci. 660 and Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/polsci/666/001.nsf

Focuses on major developments in international monetary and trade relations. Evaluates both theoretical explanations and empirical evidence for current trends. Among the topics studied are how the introduction of the Euro affects international monetary and commercial relations and whether regionalization enhances or diminishes both prospects for global liberalization and the stability of the international system. Explores the role of international institutions in monetary and trade relations and the interaction between domestic politics and international negotiations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 668. War in World Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul K Huth (phuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/polsci/668/001.nsf

In this seminar students will read and critically evaluate much of the political science literature on the causes of international conflict and war. The readings will cover the central theoretical debates and approaches in the field and related empirical studies regarding the initiation and termination of international wars. The primary objectives of the seminar are to identify the strengths and weaknesses of existing scholarship, to think about how scholarship could be improved in future research, and to prepare students for their prelim in world politics. Course requirements include participation in weekly seminar discussions, a research design paper, and two written exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 670. Proseminar in Comparative Foreign Policy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman IV (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will read and discuss the comparative foreign policy literature. Except for the literature that is based on aggregate data, the comparative foreign policy literature is almost entirely grounded empirically in American data. The seminar sessions will be organized around the question of how "portable" that literature is: Do, for instance, generalizations or theories about alliance behavior, the democratic peace, mass-elite relations, foreign policy behavior, and the like transfer or are they contextually limited?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 685 / SOC 651. Proseminar in Electoral Behavior.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gmarkus/

This course surveys theory and research on voting other forms of political participation. The context is primarily but not exclusively the U.S., at both the national and local levels.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 686. Proseminar in Public Opinion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Donald R Kinder (drkinder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is as much about the study of public opinion as about public opinion itself. The course briefly considers the meaning and measurement of the concept and the origins of contemporary research. The course examines a number of critical, classic debates about mass beliefs with implications for the quality of democratic citizenship, including voter rationality, political tolerance, racial attitudes, and party identification. The course then reviews more recent efforts to explain and model opinion formation economic or identity-driven, self-interested or symbolic, cognitive or emotional, including the impact of the mass media, election campaigns, and the social and political context. Finally the course considers the larger consequences of public opinion, including aggregate and long-term shifts, as well as the responsiveness of political leaders to opinion polls.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 001 Cultural Change and Political Change.

Instructor(s): Ronald F Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu) , Jenna Bednar (jbednar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Although there are strong theoretical grounds for believing that cultural variables may influence given societies' economic growth rates, fertility rates, or the survival of democratic institutions, cultural variables have largely been left out of quantitative analyses of these topics. One reason for this is that, although abundant data are available for economic variables, reliable and cross-nationally comparable measures of cultural variables simply have not been available: in their absence, the relevant literature largely consisted of sweeping claims about the role of culture based on impressionistic measures.

In the light of recent evidence, it seems clear that either mass belief systems play a crucial role in the survival of stable democracy (as the political culture literature has argued), or that democratic institutions have an astonishingly strong power to shape the culture of their societies (as institutional determinists would argue); or that some third factor such as economic development is determining both of them (as modernization theorists from Marx to Rostow and Bell would argue, with important differences in emphasis).

The evidence from the first global surveys ever carried out indicates that many basic beliefs and values are changing over time and that these changes are coherent and, to some extent, predictable. Furthermore, these changes are predictable in ways that can be usefully interpreted in terms of rational choice models. This course will examine recent literature based on the empirical and theoretical analysis of cultural change. The findings and interpretations have given rise to a good deal of controversy. Although cultural theory and rational choice theory are often depicted as mutually incompatible approaches, in some respects they converge.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 002 American Political Development: Political & Social Identities in the U.S.

Instructor(s): Cara J Wong

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is designed to provide students with an introduction to the concept of identity in the context of American politics. We begin by examining the definition of identity, its sources, and its measurement. After these issues have been addressed, we turn to an exploration of the effects of identities on public opinion, behavior, and politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 003 Elections, Political Parties, and Legislatures.

Instructor(s): Kenneth W Kollman (kkollman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the study of elections, political parties, and legislatures. The readings will be primarily research papers that present mathematical or computational models of democratic institutions and procedures. Therefore, I will assume that students have a basic understanding of the concepts in game theory and social choice, including Nash equilibrium, subgame perfection, backwards induction, Bayesian equilibrium, spatial voting games, and bargaining games. Readings will include applications to institutions and procedures from American and comparative politics. Students will be asked to present formal models to the class, and to develop their own models.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 004 East Asian Security.

Instructor(s): Kenneth G Lieberthal

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/polsci/688/004.nsf

This seminar will examine recent developments and prospects regarding Asian security. The seminar will address the underlying forces that are shaping the overall security environment in Asia, the political frameworks through which security issues are filtered in each of the major countries, and pertinent resulting policy matters. It will take fully into account both American and Asian perspectives on these issues. A portion of the seminar meetings will feature guests who are or were key security players in the region. Students, therefore, will have an opportunity not only to study major security trends and issues but also, on some matters, to discuss these problems with people who hold or have held direct responsibility for dealing with them. The seminar is open to graduate students in LS&A and in the Ford School of Public Policy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 005 American Political Development.

Instructor(s): Scott James (scjames@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students with an introduction to the study of American political development. Classic and contemporary APD readings will be employed to introduce concepts, analytic orientations, and theoretical debates central to the historical study of American political institutions and the politics of institutional change. The course is loosely organized into three parts. Part I is devoted to conceptual tool building. Here we explore foundational concepts like "development," "institutional analysis," and "temporality." Part II is organized to provide exposure to alternative frameworks and paradigms in the APD literature, such as "the realignment synthesis," "the organizational synthesis," and "dualist democracy." Finally, Part III introduces students to representative work in the APD subfield, drawing both on canonical works and on recent scholarship by second-generation APD scholars. Among the topics we will consider in this section are multiple orders analysis, the politics of American state building (the cornerstone of the APD subfield), and, lastly, recent work on association building and the sources of American civic vitality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 006 Policies and Policy Process of the European Union

Instructor(s): Neil Nugent

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


POLSCI 692. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A direct reading on a topic of the student's choice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 694. Qualitative Research Methods.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ann Chih Lin (annlin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/polsci/694/001.nsf

This proseminar will introduce students to a range of positivist and interpretive uses of qualitative methods; to the design and evaluation of research employing qualitative methods; and to techniques of qualitative data collection, analysis, and writing. It will also help students develop a sense of the possibilities and limits of qualitative data and an understanding of their professional obligations as researchers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 699. Statistical Methods in Political Research II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert J Franzese Jr (franzese@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Pol. Sci. 599 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course serves as an introduction to the quantitative methodology of the social sciences. It complements a thorough introduction to linear-regression analysis with a more preliminary introduction to the analysis of non-linear functional relationships (especially those associated with binary dependent variables). The course aims to teach students how to construct, estimate, and interpret empirical models that match their theoretical counterparts and maximize leverage from available data for the empirical evaluation of those theoretical propositions. Topics include the classic linear regression model, extensions thereof, specifications and data issues therein (such as omitted variables, multicollinearity, and multiplicative interactions), criticism of such models, and some introduction to time-series and binary-dependent-variable models.

Examples will be drawn from the social sciences with emphasis on political science. Frequent homework exercises will give students experience with the practical application of techniques learned. There will also be a final exam and a paper. The prerequisite is a background in basic mathematics at the level of PS 598 along with some familiarity with elementary statistics (PS 599), or permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 699. Statistical Methods in Political Research II.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Corrine Marie McConnaughy

Prerequisites: Pol. Sci. 599 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


POLSCI 702. Selected Political Theorists.

Section 001 Arendt and others.

Instructor(s): Andreas Kalyvas (akal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore the concept of the political. We will begin with the classical distinctions between the polis and the household, nature and convention, Aristotle's ethical definition of the political community, and Plato's metaphor of politics as weaving. Next, we will examine the turn to political realism exemplified by Max Weber, Carl Schmitt, and Nicos Poulantzas, who reflected on the presence of exclusion, violence, pluralism, enmity, antagonism, and class within the political. We will then move on to focus on the seminal works of Hannah Arendt and Cornelius Castoriadis. Topics related to power, sovereignty, the nature of political action, the positioning of law, the central importance of the public space, and the problems representation poses for a democratic formulation of the political, will be closely examined. We will also concentrate on questions pertaining to the autonomy of the political, the will and decisionism, and the faculty of judgment. Particular emphasis will be given to revolutionary new beginnings and the radical self-institution of society. Finally, we will conclude, with short selections from John Rawls and Jürgen Habermas, by inquiring into the normative foundations of the political and its relation to justice and by assessing the respective merits and limits of the agonistic/performative, conflictual/instituting, and consensual/rational models of the political.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 730 / PUBPOL 730 / DOC 818. Women and Employment Policy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mary Corcoran (marycor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.spp.umich.edu/courses/syllabi/736syl.htm

See Public Policy 730.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 734 / PUBPOL 732 / EDUC 764. Public Policy in Postsecondary Education.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael Nettles (nettlesm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy 732.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 741. Seminar in Comparative Politics.

Section 001 Research Seminar on Religion and Politics.

Instructor(s): Daniel H Levine (dhldylan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a research seminar on religion and politics. After a review of several recent works and a discussion of central theoretical and methodological issues, the seminar will work towards constructing, refining, and critiquing research proposals.

Ongoing work will be presented and reviewed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 768. Conflict Systems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J David Singer (jdsinger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a graduate level research seminar and will focus on "existing" (typically published) research earlier in the term and "future" research that we will plan and design later in the term. While no major investigations are likely to be completed during the term, this seminar will put you onto that road and give you a running start toward your dissertation or an ambitious conference paper. It assumes some awareness of index construction and the generation of data as well as intermediate statistics. While conflict in any social system may be your empirical concern, the emphasis will probably be on armed conflict at the intra-state and inter-state levels. In addition to a few written exercises, the final product will be a full-scale research design for a study that typically builds upon and then goes beyond the existing corpus of work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 786. Stochastic Models of Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel P Carpenter (dancarp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Poli. Sci. 598 and graduate standing. (3). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course surveys stochastic methods as they are applied to questions in political science, economics, public policy, and sociology. Stochastic methods are founded in models of probability, and different concepts in probability theory are used to model different phenomena in political economy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 793. Methods Seminar.

Section 001 Complexity Theory in the Social Sciences. (2 credits).

Instructor(s): Robert Axelrod (axe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3).

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~axe/complexity_syllabus.htm

Complexity theory is an interdisciplinary approach to understanding dynamic processes involving the interaction of many actors. This course focuses on agent-based modeling that is one of the primary methods of analyzing complex adaptive systems. Agent-based modeling involves specifying how individual agents (such as people, nations, or organizations) interact with each other and with their environment. Computer simulation is then used to discover the emergent properties of the model, and thereby gain insights into dynamic processes that would be too difficult to model with standard mathematical techniques.

The course will consider a wide variety of applications of agent-based models to the social sciences, including residential segregation, cultural change, social influence, war, alliances, nation formation, organizational change, elections, and markets.

There will be four small exercises, and one major project selected by the student. Knowledge of a programming language is required. The course is intended for graduate students in a wide variety of fields, not just political science.

A course pack is available from Dollar Bill Copy, 611 Church St, 665-9200.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 795 / REES 795 / HISTORY 795 / ECON 795 / GEOG 795 / RUSSIAN 795. Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies.

Instructor(s): Jane R Burbank (jburbank@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 795.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 825 / HISTORY 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 838. Mathematical Models: Advanced Game Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott E Page (spage@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Regression Analysis/Pol. Sci. 699 and Game Theory/Pol. Sci. 818. ICPSR Summer Program.(3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will study and apply concepts from advanced game theory and mechanism design. The topics will be chosen by the students in the first few meetings of the class. Based upon the topics that we choose, we will then select appropriate tools from game theory. We will first study the tools and then analyze their applications. Students are expected to have taken an introductory game theory course in political science or economics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 892. Directed Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed research on a topic of the student's choice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for POLSCI.


Page Counter


This page was created at 4:43 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2001 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.