College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Sociology


This page was created at 4:46 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Sociology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for SOC

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Sociology.


SOC 401. Contemporary Social Issues III.

Introductory courses

Section 001 Race, Class and Social Policy.

Instructor(s): David R Harris (drharris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). (Introductory course). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.allharris.com/soc401.html

This course focuses on definitions and consequences of race and class in American society. Throughout we will pay close attention to how existing social policies affect racial and class inequalities, as well as what alternative policies might be pursued. Topics will include: the new census race categories, affirmative action, welfare reform, wealth, and the digital divide. The format of the class will be a combination of lecture and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 428. Contemporary China.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Xiaogang Wu

Prerequisites: Soc. 100, 195, or 300. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course gives a survey of post-1949 Chinese society, focusing on the social change since 1978. The course is structured not as a historical chronology, but rather as a thematic discussion of some major issues in socialist China. We will explore the basic institutional make-up of Chinese society, the structural changes brought forth in the reform era, and how these institutions configure social life in China.

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SOC 429. Social Institutions of Modern Japan.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Azumi Ann Takata (takata@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology, anthropology, political science, or economics. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/429/001.nsf

This term, we will focus on institutions of Japanese business and labor. We will begin with an overview of business and economic conditions in Japan. In the first half of the course, we will examine aspects of Japanese business, such as company structure, subcontracting relations, distribution networks, corporate groups, government relations, and globalization. In the second part, we will take up issues in Japanese labor, such as transition from school to work, hiring and promotion, compensation, training, and gender/race issues.

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SOC 447 / WOMENSTD 447. Sociology of Gender.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Rudd (erudd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Why distinguish between sex and gender? Is gender just about women? What does the distinction between men and women have to do with families, economies, states, and social change? How does gender shape major social institutions? In this course, students will gain tools for asking and answering questions like these through close readings of influential gender theorists such as literary critic Toril Moi and sociologists Evelyn Nakano-Glenn and R.W. Connell, studying empirical research which applies a "gender lens," and engagement with representations of gender in dance, song, and film. The course strives to inspire students to think broadly and creatively about gender as embedded in everyday life, enabling and constraining social interactions, and structuring organizations and institutions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 450. Political Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to political sociology with a particular emphasis on the relationship between economics and politics. Basic concepts such as power, state, nation, and class will be introduced and applied to the analysis of the development and change of political systems in historical and comparative perspective. The course examines (a) the historical origins of democracy, fascism, and communism as political systems, (b) imperialism, development, and revolution in the Third World, and (c) class, class coalitions, and the state in post New-Deal U.S. politics. Introductory courses in sociology or political science desirable but not required. Lecture/discussion; midterm and final.

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SOC 454. Law and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel H Sharphorn (dsharphn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One sociology introduction. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to examine the organization of law in society and the relationships between law and society. The approach will be primarily from a sociological perspective; however, we will also explore the views of legal scholars, anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, and others. While the course will be a survey of "law and social organization" in general, we will focus on current topics of special interest as a device for our study: the death penalty, rape laws, affirmative action and anti-discrimination laws, university rules and regulations, and others. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of the extent of the study of law and social organization and the leading theories and ideas about it, and will be asked to think critically and independently about legal systems and the role of law in society.

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SOC 458. Sociology of Education.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Schoem (dschoem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the purposes and roles of schooling in society. We will explore issues of socialization, stratification, the social organization of schools and classrooms, and the uses of both formal and hidden curriculums. We will examine issues of inequality, race, class and gender, cultural transmission and social change. We also will explore the role and experience of participants in schooling. Finally, we will examine contemporary issues in schools and possibilities for change in schools and change in society. Students are expected to be active participants in discussions and presentation of class readings and topics. There will be one short paper and a take-home exam. Students also will be expected to devote considerable time and effort to a research paper on some aspect of school change.

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SOC 460. Social Change.

Section 001 Labor and Global Social Change.

Instructor(s): Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~eian/Soc460syllabus.pdf

How is the global economy changing and why? What do these changes imply for workers and their organizations in the global North and South, and how are they responding to the challenges and opportunities created by the current model of economic globalization? Will any of the leading proposals for the reform of trade, labor law, and immigration policies make a positive difference for workers? If so, which ones and why? This course explores these questions, paying special attention to the experience of workers, and the strategies of governments, corporations, and unions, in the USA and Mexico. During Winter break, there will be an optional field trip to the maquiladora city of Nogales, Mexico. Financial support for students who go on the field trip will be provided by the Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations' Labor and Global Change Program.

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SOC 463 / COMM 485. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.

Section 001 Meets with Comm 485.002.

Instructor(s): Nicholas A Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 463.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 463 / COMM 485. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.

Section 002 Meets with Comm 485.002.

Instructor(s): Nicholas A Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 463.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 465 / PSYCH 488. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andre Modigliani (modigli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Introductory sociology or introductory psychology as a social science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/465/001.nsf

The course will examine how people become social deviants and how relevant social institutions contribute to this process. Early portions will examine the legal enforcement, judicial, and corrections systems which together determine who will be designated deviant and with what consequences. Later portions will focus on particular forms of deviance (e.g., delinquency, theft, fraud, rape) with a view to understanding and evaluating the several theoretical perspectives that have been proposed to explain their genesis and perpetuation.

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SOC 475 / MEDCARE 475. Introduction to Medical Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Renee Anspach (ranspach@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore social aspects of health, aging, and the health care system in American society. We will examine such issues as the social causation of disease, relationships between doctors and patients, the health professions, health care among women and the poor, current health care crisis in a national and cross-cultural perspective.

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SOC 493 / GERMAN 493. The Politics of Fascism and Right-Wing Movements.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 Meets with Political Science 489.002.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 493.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 002 Sociology of Aging and the Life Course. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Duane Francis Alwin (dfa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/womenstd/483/002.nsf

The objectives of this course are to increase students' appreciation of a sociological perspective on aging and the life course. The course will introduce students to the major theories and concepts social and behavioral scientists use to describe and understand the process of aging as a social phenomenon. Topics to be covered include (among others) theories of aging, issues in the demography of aging, health and disability, successful aging, work and retirement, intergenerational support in the family, and death and dying. Upon completion of the course students will be able to describe and interpret age-related transitions; identify the contributions of a variety of disciplines (e.g., biology, sociology, psychology, anthropology, philosophy) to the study of aging; critically analyze major issues and controversies related to aging; identify major legislation and policies that affect the older population; and to access information on a range of topics connected to the study of aging.

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SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 003 Women and Work - Meets with Women's Studies 483.002 (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Laurie Morgan (morganla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

3 credit course. This course will draw on research and theory from sociology, economics, psychology, anthropology, history and organizational behavior to analyze a wide range of issues regarding gender and work. We will study the construction of gender through work, effects of changing technology, gendered structures of opportunity, emotion work, globalization of women's work (both through capital and labor mobility), sexual harassment, work and family, housework, gender segregation of jobs, pay inequality, and trends in paid labor force participation and attachment. The objective is that students come away from the course able to engage scholarship on these issues across different disciplines.

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SOC 496. Special Course.

Section 001 Cnflict, Hstry & Reslotn in the Estrn Mediterranean. Meets with Soc 596.001.

Instructor(s): Taner Akcam

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is offered as a part of a long-term project organized by the International Institute that aims to establish a center for the Study of History, Conflict and Reconciliation in the Eastern Mediterranean. This Center would develop a unique historical and geographical perspective on the current conflicts in an area that spans from the Balkans to the Middle East. This course employs social sciences in general and history in particular to examine the conflicts in the region; it focuses primarily on the Turkish-Armenian conflict and its possible resolution while also providing an overview of the Kurdish-Turkish and Nagorno-Karabagh issues. In this new formulation, history is not employed merely as a supplementary category, but rather as an integral part of the dilemma itself. Yet the main purpose of the course is not to elaborate on 'what really happened' either, but rather to show the manner of dispute surrounding the issue. The course analyzes and demonstrates that beside history itself, the discourse on history -- how one speaks about history -- and its representation are equally important. In fact, in the above-mentioned conflicts, the historical discourse and its representation are not merely a major part of the problem, but even a new source of it. Therefore, rather than focusing on the actual events, the course examines how the issue has been/is handled and interpreted. The intent of the course is thus to seek out the possibilities of a dialogue that could eventually lead to its resolution. One of the important elements that reproduces conflict and hinders dialogue in the region is 'grounded prejudice'. Opposing groups have sustained this prejudice across time and space, and through social and cultural institutions and practices, After surveying the dynamics of each conflict, the course articulates the concept of grounded prejudice and suggest different scenarios through which it could be eliminated. The course concludes with the analysis of this grounded prejudice, thereby opening up the possibility of dialogue by creating a space in which dialogue may occur, identifying and circumventing the obstacles involved, and creating a new language through which to articulate it. The 'Insider Outsider' model is employed in particular to elucidate one of the important sources that creates of these prejudices. The course requirements include two in-class presentations and one final paper

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SOC 504 / AMCULT 504. American Immigration: Sociological Perspectives.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; seniors with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Both the study of immigration and the questions that study raises are at the very root of social science. In this course we survey the literature that gives evidence of the major concepts, questions, and approaches which sociologists have used to study immigration, as well as the interface between immigration, race, and ethnicity in America. In this seminar, we will seek to focus each session on a different topic, such as the origin of ethnic stratification, race, and racism; the contrasting theoretical explanations of assimilation and internal colonialism for the reality of group differences in social outcomes in America; the different levels of analysis, micro vs. macro approaches to immigration; the causes and consequences of the differential incorporation of immigrants in American society; political vs. economic immigrants as different social types; middleman minorities vs. the ethnic enclave vs. the ethnic economy as models of immigrant adaptation; women and migration; and social networks and gender as the link between micro and macro levels of analysis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 506. Theory and Practice.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark S Mizruchi (mizruchi@umich.edu) , Renee Anspach (ranspach@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the second of a two-term theory sequence required by all sociology department graduate students. We begin by exploring how classical and contemporary sociologists, representing a variety of perspectives and intellectual orientations, have theorized about several core issues: the nature of society and the social, the individual-society relationship, identity and the self, culture, and social structure. In the second part of the course we examine how sociological theories can illuminate several substantive areas in the discipline, including organizations and the economy, the professions, development, and various forms of social inequality.

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SOC 512 / POLSCI 512. Practicum in Survey Research.

Section 001 Detroit Area Study. Meets with NRE 501.042.

Instructor(s): Michael Couper

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/512/001.nsf

Sociology 512 is the second course in the three course sequence that constitutes the practicum in survey research known as the Detroit Area Study (DAS). This practicum provides students with a working knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of the survey method. Sociology 512 concentrates on survey methodology. Class time will be devoted to instruction and practice in questionnaire development, pretesting, blocklisting, sampling, coding, and interviewer training. The skills taught during class periods are preparation for out-of-class field work that culminates in the conduct of a survey of residents in the tri-county Detroit metropolitan area.

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SOC 521 / CAAS 521. African American Intellectual Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alford A Young Jr (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior standing. CAAS 201 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 521.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 523. Practicum in Qualitative Research Methods II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karin A Martin (kamartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the second of the two-term qualitative research practicum that introduces students to qualitative research (primarily participant observation and in-depth interviewing) through a variety of activities. In this academic term we will primarily be engaged in analyzing and presenting the data for others. As in 522, we will learn from reading others' accounts of qualitative data analysis and "how-to" books on qualitative work, but primarily we will learn from doing qualitative research and talking to each other about what we do. We will talk with each other about our findings, problems, issues, topics, substance, and all other research dilemmas in a variety of ways, in large group discussion in class, in small structured and unstructured group discussions in and out of class. Students will produce a final professional research paper.

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SOC 544. Sociology of Family and Kinship.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Pamela J Smock (pjsmock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course considers a broad range of issues central to family and household studies. Special attention is given to exploring the life course perspective emphasizing the ways in which individuals and their families change over the life course and the ways social change modifies individual life course processes. Particular concern will be given to conceptual and methodological issues involved with the study of family and transitions. Examines theoretical approaches useful for understanding kin networks, childbearing, and marital formation and dissolution.

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SOC 545. Sociology of the Life Course.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Deborah S Carr (carrds@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the theories, methods, and substantive topics which exemplify the life course paradigm. Life course research is interdisciplinary by nature and design, and thus readings encompass the fields of sociology, history, psychology, and demography. Substantive foci range from social psychological outcomes such as stress, self-esteem, occupational values and cognitive complexity, to family development, marital and fertility patterns, educational and occupational attainment, retirement, and deviance.

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SOC 560. Power, History, and Social Change.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 595. Special Courses.

Section 001 The Civil Rights Movement.

Instructor(s): Monica Prasad (prasadmo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Why did the civil rights movement led by African Americans in the United States between 1930 and 1970 succeed in dismantling the legal infrastructure of segregation, but fail in its later attempt to address economic inequalities between Black and white Americans? And how can these empirical events inform our theoretical understanding of race, class, and social change? These questions will structure our reading of the literature. Particular attention will be given to the role of law in the movement, the consequences of the movement for American politics and society, and the challenge posed by emancipatory movements to relativist social theory (and vice versa). Note: For this topic, there is no background in social psychology required.

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SOC 596. Special Courses.

Section 001 Meets with Soc 496.001.

Instructor(s): Taner Akcam

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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SOC 610. Statistical Methods.

Section 001 Multivariate Techniques.

Instructor(s): Mark S Mizruchi (mizruchi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Soc. 510 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (4).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mizruchi/soc610.pdf

This course is the second portion of the two-term sequence (Sociology 510, 610) required of all graduate students in the department of Sociology.. It consists of two weekly class sessions plus a lab-discussion. This term focuses on multivariate techniques, especially multiple linear regression. The lab sessions will be used to discuss problems encountered in the lectures and written assignments and to refine students' statistical computing skills. The course assumes knowledge of the material covered in Sociology 510. It assumes no mathematical knowledge beyond high school algebra, but students will have an opportunity to develop elementary skills in more advanced mathematical techniques.

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SOC 612 / PSYCH 687. Methods of Survey Sampling.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two graduate-level courses in statistical methods. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/612/001.nsf

Methods of Survey Sampling/Applied Sampling is an applied statistical methods course, but differs from most statistics courses. It is concerned almost exclusively with the design of data collection. Little of the analysis of collected data will be discussed in the course. The course will concentrate on problems of applying sampling methods to human populations, since survey practices are more widely used in that area, and since sampling human populations poses a number particular problems not found in sampling of other types of units. The principles of sample selection, though, can be applied to many other types of populations.

The course is presented at a moderately advanced statistical level. While we will not develop the mathematical aspects of sampling theory, statistical notation and outlines of some algebraic proofs will be given. A sound background in applied statistics is necessary, since a few algebraic derivations will be presented. Little emphasis will be placed on the derivations. Nonetheless, a thorough understanding of the notation and results will be needed.

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SOC 622. Social Stratification.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course surveys various theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of social stratification. Emphasis is placed on social inequalities by sex, race, and family background in attaining social status as measured by education, occupation, and income. Societal variations along both temporal and regional dimensions will be considered. Students are encouraged to critically evaluate the current literature and conduct their own research using individual-level data from censuses and surveys.

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SOC 634 / CAAS 634. The Urban Ethnographic Tradition: Theory, Method, Standpoint.

Section 001 (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Alford A Young (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; seniors with permission of instructor. (3-4).

Credits: (3-4,3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

By paying specific attention to litature that addresses race and class inequality, this course provides a critical consideration of the contributions of the urban ethnographic tradition in American sociology. A series of classic and contemporary ethnographies will be discussed in seminar-style format.

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SOC 649. Family: Gender and the State.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julia Potter Adams (jpadams@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This graduate seminar explores the new interdisciplinary interest in the historical and contemporary intersection of family structures, gender, states and citizenship. Our main goal is to understand the ways in which citizenship rights including legal, political, and social rights emerged over time and space, how they operate in relationship to states and their legal systems, and how these were/are in turn shaped by gender, sexuality, family practices, and collective action.

The course engages with ongoing debates and special topics, including: democracy and discourses of gender difference; the relationship between legal and political discourses; social welfare and the Skocpol/Gordon debate over gender and making of the American welfare state; globalization and the "end of the nation-state"; "post-national citizenship" and the European Union; citizenship versus human rights; and the meaning of civil society and the public sphere.

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SOC 651 / POLSCI 685. Proseminar in Electoral Behavior.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Political Science 865.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 695. Directed Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed research on a topic of the student's choice. An individual instructor must agree to direct such research, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 696. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 710. Advanced Topics in Quantitative Methodology.

Section 001 Causal Inference in the Social Sciences. Meets with Statistics 617.001, Psych. 808.009, and Education 737.001.

Instructor(s): Yu Xie (yuxie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and Soc. 610. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~yuxie/Courses/Soc710/index.html

In this course we explore and critique methods for conducting causal inference in the social sciences. These methods will be drawn from a wide variety of disciplines, including economics, sociology, statistics, education, psychology, and epidemiology. Particular attention will be paid to causal inference from quasi-experimental and observational research designs. This course is part of the Michigan Methodology Seminar. It provides an interdisciplinary forum for researchers and graduate students in several related disciplines at Michigan to be engaged in discussing cutting-edge issues in social science methodology.

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SOC 713 / POLSCI 713. Seminar in Constitutional Law.

Section 001 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Study of Legal Institutions.

Instructor(s): Noga Morag-Levine (noga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Pol. Sci. 613 and Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Political Science 713.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 717 / STATS 580 / BIOSTAT 617. Methods and Theory of Sample Design.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Three or more courses in statistics and preferably a course in methods of survey sampling. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Statistics 717.001.

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SOC 729 / HISTORY 729. Large-Scale Political Transformations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret R Somers (peggs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Soc. 100, 195, or 300; reading knowledge of one European language other than English; Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/729/001.nsf

Sociology of Citizenship and Rights Citizenship rights are back on the sociological agenda after a prolonged focus on issues of class and state formation. The resurgence of sociological interest is clearly a response to world events; rarely have the politics of citizenship, rights, and social change more dramatically been yoked together than in the revolutions and upheavals of recent years. Escalating international migration patterns have forced attention to the rules and rights of membership in different nation states. Across Europe and Asia societies constructed on frameworks of national state control and social entitlements have collapsed or have been fundamentally challenged by the dynamic momentum of an extraordinary source of power the mobilizing force of popular claims to citizenship rights and identities. And in Britain and the United States Westerners are asking whether we can continue to count on the presence of the equalizing tendencies of citizenship (especially welfare provisioning) to ameliorate, or at least act as a trade-off for, the economic inequalities we have come to accept as the costs of market capitalism. The world historical impact of these events is obvious. But they also carry a sociological message: People are empowered by an "identity politics"; social change has been made by those whose sense of who they Are has been violated fundamentally; and it increasingly appears that the identity of one's self as a "rights-bearing" person is one of the most inviolable, and empowering of identities. The implications for sociological reflection are both large and urgent: Just what is this power we call citizenship and how and why is such an identity constructed as a dynamic force in history? This seminar will first examine the classic perspectives on citizenship e.g. Marx, Weber, Tocqueville, Polanyi; T.H. Marshall; and Habermas. Through historical readings and discussion, we will then address a number of issues central to the topic of citizenship, including those of civil society; the public sphere; gender and racial patterns of citizenshipexclusion; civil, political, and social rights; the relationship between citizenship equalities and social class inequalities. Class participation by all; weekly 1-2 page "reaction papers"; and a 30 page final research paper will be required. This course will serve as a useful (although not required) prologue to Sociology 532-533.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 785 / PSYCH 785. Group Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eugene Burnstein (geneburn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 785.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 803. Research Seminar in Race and Ethnicity.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David R Harris (drharris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://people.mw.mediaone.net/drharris1/soc803.html

This course engages major issues in the study of race and ethnicity through a combination of readings, group discussions, and presentations. Every effort will be made to integrate perspectives from disciplines other than sociology, and to address racial and ethnic issues outside the traditional Black-white paradigm.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 825 / HISTORY 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 830. Research Seminar in Social Demography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Pamela J Smock (pjsmock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Population Background. Graduate standing. (1-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is offered every term. Students in the Social Demography Program are expected to attend it continuously when in residence for 1-3 credits per term. Its objectives are to socialize students to be professional researchers and help students write research papers. It consists of the PSC Brownbag Seminar, the Student Research Forum, and group and individualized meetings with the instructor. Although students are enrolled for only 1 or 2 credits most of the time, they are required to register for full (3) credits at least once, in the term they complete and present a research paper. It is expected that students who use Sociology 830 to fulfill their research seminar requirement in the Department of Sociology be enrolled in Sociology 830 for at least two terms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 850 / PSYCH 890 / EPID 850. Psychosocial Factors in Mental Health I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David R Williams (wildavid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May be elected more than once.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Selected advanced topics including problems of diagnosing psychopathology through community surveys, psychosocial predictors of mental illness, primary prevention and coping with undesirable life events. This seminar brings together a multidisciplinary set of faculty and students from sociology, psychology, health behavior and health education, psychiatry, and epidemiology to present and discuss recent research on the social and psychological sources of mental and physical health. Substantively, the seminar will focus on the role of psychosocial and social structural factors in the etiology and course of health and illness, including the study of life events, chronic role strains, resources for adapting to potential stressors, and the actual process of coping and adaptation. The application of social epidemiology to problems of service utilization may also be considered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 988 / PSYCH 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 001 Topic? (credits?)

Instructor(s): Denise J Sekaquaptewa (dsekaqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 988.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 988 / PSYCH 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 003 Theories of the Public Sphere. (3 credits). Meets with Communication Studies 810.001

Instructor(s): Catherine R Squires (squiresc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 810.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alford A Young Jr (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Winter Academic Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


Undergraduate Course Listings for SOC.


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