College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Spanish


This page was created at 4:46 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Spanish
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for SPANISH

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Spanish.


SPANISH 405. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics.

Instructor(s): Teresa L Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276. Taught in Spanish. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/spanish/405/001.nsf

This course is an introduction to the main concepts and methods of analysis of linguistics, focusing on Spanish. The central part of the course introduces concepts and techniques of the analysis of word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics), and sounds (phonology). The last third of the course examines subfields of linguistics such as pyscholinguistics (study of language acquisition) and sociolinguistics (the study of language variation).

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SPANISH 410 / ROMLING 410. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego De Blibeche (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer participants a theoretical foundation in Spanish phonetics and phonology. It includes the study of articulatory phonetics, phological theory, distinctive feature analysis, practice in transcription, lab practice, contrastive analysis of English and Spanish sounds, with special attention to those sounds of Spanish that are most difficult for English speakers to acquire. The grade will be based on a midterm and a final exam, four quizzes, various homework assignments and a final paper. Course is conducted in Spanish.

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SPANISH 414 / ROMLING 414. Background of Modern Spanish.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven N Dworkin (dworkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lecture course surveys the historical, social, cultural, and literary background against which the spoken Latin of the Iberian Peninsula evolved into Spanish. The emphasis is on the external rather than the internal history of Spanish. Topics covered include the influence on the development of Spanish of such diverse languages as Basque, Gothic, Arabic, French, Italian, and Literary Latin, the role of the Reconquest (Reconquista) in shaping the linguistic map of Spain, the circumstances leading to the rise of the Castilian dialect as the national standard, and an overview of the linguistic situation in modern Spain. The course will be taught in Spanish. The textbook will be made available in a course pack. There will be a midterm and final exams, and a written report. Prerequisite: Good reading knowledge of Spanish.

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SPANISH 432. Gender, Writing, and Culture.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Contemporary Latin America.

Instructor(s): Diane E Marting

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). For Grad credit, must do regular course work assigned, as well as 20 page research paper.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will explore critical concepts related to the binary of gender and its history in Spanish American literature. In class, examples from the Latin American visual arts in the twentieth-century will be compared and contrasted with the written manifestation of gender throughout the academic term. First the gender binary of fixed male and female identities will be analyzed in two short works of fiction about the female witch or outsider, whose marginalized identities fascinate or frighten. In Somers' early novella La mujer desnuda and Fuentes' short story Aura women represent the lawless wild (out)side of culture. Next we will analyze two humorous and sarcastic dramatic works by feminists, Mexican Rosario Castellanos and Puerto Rican Rosario Ferré. In these plays farce, parody and theatricality ridicule stereotypes of women writers and other women in society and in literature. In order to better conceptualize the causes of the persistence and the decadence of such clichés, we will then discuss sections of Lucía Guerra's historical and critical essay, La mujer fragmentada, and Nelly Richard's more theoretical work, Masculino/femenino. These chapters from Chilean feminists summarize much recent thought on gender in writing and culture. Finally, cultural elements the theories see as evincing untraditional views of gender, or as aiming to transcend the gender duality, will be analyzed in José Donoso's novella.

  • Rosario Castellanos, El eterno femenino.
  • Rosario Ferré, El coloquio de las perras.
  • Carlos Fuentes, Aura.
  • Armonía Somers, La mujer desnuda.
  • Nelly Richard, Masculino y femenino: prácticas de la diferencia y cultura democrática.
  • José Donoso, El lugar sin límites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 435. Independent Study.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of department. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Interested students should contact the concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 437. Introduction to Literature Studies and Criticism.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Santiago Colas (scolas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

  • What do literary critics do?
  • What have they done?
  • What can they do?
  • How is studying literature (being part of Literary Studies) different, or not, than reading literature?
  • What's the relationship between a practice called "criticism" and a feeling called "pleasure"?
  • How about between that practice and unpleasure?
  • How can writing communicate the experience of reading?
  • What's the connection between criticism and creativity?
  • Who cares about literary criticism anyway?
  • And why should they?

In this course, we will explore these questions via a series of readings of fiction, literary criticism, and literary theory. Students should emerge from the course with: (1) an elementary understanding of the variety of practices that may constitute literary criticism as a practice; (2) an introductory glimpse into the various institutional forces that help determine what gets called literary criticism; (3) exposure to the assumptions, habits, feelings, and values of critical thinking. A great deal of writing will be required in the course, particularly in the form of regular short essays. The course will be conducted in English.

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SPANISH 438. The Economy and Politics in Latin America/Spain.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 The Economy and Politics of Literature in Latin America.

Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276 and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will study the symbiosis of politics, economy, and fiction in the making of modern Latin America. We will begin the course discussing the following question: How are the notions of ideology, national culture, and social formation related to a political reading of fiction? Through a careful reading of a nineteenth-century novel, we will explore the formation of national states and the organization of free trade. The course then will move on to the study of literature, national popular consciousness, and import substituting industrialization (1930-1950), and, finally, to national affirmation and transnationalization (1950-1980).

Though students in the course do not need to have a previous background in Latin American politics and economics, they are expected to be interested in the relations between literature, politics, and economics. Course requirements will include three partial take-home exams (60%) and a final take-home (40%).

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SPANISH 456. Golden Age.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Spanish Golden Age Literature.

Instructor(s): Frank P Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course deals with the major writers of Spain's Siglo de Oro. We will read representative works of the major figures of the period: Fernando de Rojas, Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, Miguel de Cervantes, Calderón de la Barca and Lazarillo de Tormes.

The reading of these texts will be accompanied by material on the social and economic situations of the period: the Conversos, the problem of poverty, the idealization of the pastoral world and the conflict between traditional society and the fast developing world of commerce.

Students will write two essays and take a final examination.

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SPANISH 467. Literary and Artistic Movements in Latin America/Spain.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Literatura de la posguerra civil española.

Instructor(s): Ana Monica Montero (ammon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). For Grad credit, must also do 20 pg. research paper. May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

La Guerra civil española (1936-1939) fue un conflicto civil que marcó la historia, la conciencia y la expresión cultural de España durante el resto del siglo XX. Este curso comienza con una breve introducción a la historia de la Guerra civil, tras la cual se propone revisar algunas de las manifestaciones más destacadas de la posguerra: humor escapista, comics, rol de la mujer, narrativa breve, literatura de queja social, etc. Todos estos temas expresan la repercusión de la Guerra civil, su tratamiento o su ausencia. Algunos de los autores cuyo trabajo se analizará son: Francisco Ayala, Miguel Délibes, Carmen Martín Gaite, Jardiel Poncela y Camilo José Cela. La dinámica habitual de la clase incluirá el análisis de textos, la discusión de tópicos y breves presentaciones. Las clases se desarrollarán en castellano, aunque se tendrá en cuenta la dificultad del estudiante con el idioma. Habrá dos exámenes, 2 ensayos y un proyecto final. La participación del estudiante es importante para un óptimo desarrollo del curso.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 472. Pre-Columbian Societies.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OF THE AMERICAS: WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THEM AND HOW WE REPRESENT THEM.

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276 and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/spanish/472/001.nsf

This course will focus on Ancient civilizations in the Americas and how we perceive them today. One of its purposes is to give students an idea of the vast variety of indigenous cultures in pre-Columbian times, how much we know about some of them but, most of all, how much we ignore. Special attention will be paid to their subsistence patterns and social organizational principles. Another goal of this course is to analyze the ways in which we, from a Western vantage point, portray indigenous cultures.

Inga Clendinnen's Aztecs. An Interpretation gives us the chance to focus on a study of Aztec culture before the arrival of the Spaniards. It provides us, too, with a challenging example of the pros and cons of ethnohistorical reconstruction.

We will read Steve Stern's book on a region of the former Inca empire, Huamanga, in order to learn about the relationship between the Inca rulers and their subjects. The book also deals with the different ways in which indigenous peoples from the Andes adapted to the changes provoked by European colonization. The compilation by Malpass will shed some light on the way in which the Inca occupied the different territories they conquered. It also tells us about the advantages of a research method that combines a study of both the archaeological record and the chronicles. Michael Coe's Breaking the Maya Code is an excellent source of information about how we, contemporary scholars, view the indigenous worlds of the past. Philip Deloria's Playing Indian will help us understand how many of our conceptions about indigenous cultures are based, more often than not, on our ignorance of important facts regarding the interaction between early European settlers and Amerindians.

A course pack will contain information about the cultures that populated the Valleys of the Rivers Ohio and Mississippi in prehistoric times. We will also read a couple of novels (The Witness, by J. J. Saer and People of the River, by W. M. Gear and K. O'Neal) and a few films (both fictional and documentary) that will give us an idea about how our society represents indigenous cultures. We are also going to watch a few movies that represent indigenous subjects and cultures, such as Hollywood Westerns and a couple of ethnographic films, as well as fragments from Pocahontas, 1492, and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 476. Latin-American Poetry.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Latin American Poetry.

Instructor(s): Hugo E Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Conducted in Spanish. (3). May be elected twice for credit, but not in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Qué son los sueños? Qué misterio guardan? Qué revelan sobre nuestro ser, sobre el mundo que habitamos; sobre la vida, la existencia, la realidad, el tiempo, el más allá, la muerte? Estas y similares preguntas se han planteado filósofos, poetas y místicos de todas las épocas y latitudes. En este curso estudiaremos las respuestas que cuatro autores hispánicos del siglo veinte han ofrecido a estas interrogantes de raigambre metafísico: María Zambrano (España), Humberto Díaz Casanueva (Chile), Jaime Saenz (Bolivia) y Alejandra Pizarnik (Argentina). Dedicaremos la primera parte del curso al estudio de "la fenomenología del sueño y de los sueños" de Zambrano desarrollada en sus ensayos compilados en El sueño creador y Los sueños y el tiempo. En la segunda parte del curso aplicaremos la fenomenología de Zambrano al estudio de la poesía de Díaz Casanueva, Saenz y Pizarnik. Apoyándonos en la lectura cuidadosa de estos textos, conversaremos no sólo sobre las cuestiones y los planteamientos que estos autores nos ofrecen respecto al valor congnoscitivo de los sueños, sino que también reflexionaremos sobre los puntos de convergencia y divergencia que hay entre el discurso filosófico y el poético.

El desempeño de los estudiantes será evaluado en base a su participación, dos exámenes parciales y dos trabajos escritos.

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SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Borges as Genre.

Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course presents an in-depth view of the works of Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986), the most influential Latin American writer of the 20th century.   Through a close reading of his most significant essays, short narratives, and poetry, this course will examine the literary inventions created by Borges vis-à-vis his literary persona, his apocryphal use of quotations and historical figures, as well as his fixation with libraries, new concepts of space and time, and "undiscovered" universes. Borges' vast production often intertwines fiction and essay, thus challenging any fixed or set genre affiliation for his oeuvre.  Borges is indeed a "genre in itself."   Given the complex nature of Borges' writings, our readings for this course will concentrate on his production between 1929 and 1972, which include the most important collections of his complete works: Fervor de Buenos Aires, Cuaderno de San Martín, Historia universal de la infamia, Ficciones, Aleph, Otras inquisiciones, and El Hacedor.

Selected Reading List:

  • Balderston, Daniel. Borges: realidades y simulacros. Buenos Aires : Editorial Biblos, 2000.
  • Bell-Villada, Gene H.  Borges and his fiction: a guide to his mind and art. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1999.
  • Borges, Jorge Luis.  Obras completas. 4 Vols. Barcelona: Emecé, 1996 [Selection of Vols. 1 and 2]
  • Molloy, Sylvia. Las letras de Borges y otros ensayos. Rosario, Argentina: Beatriz Viterbo Editora, 1999.

Grading: 

  • Classwork & Participation, 20%
  • 3 Short Papers, 30%
  • 2 Presentations, 20%
  • Final project,  30%

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Cortazar and Keats.

Instructor(s): Santiago Colas (scolas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided

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SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002 Paideia mexicana: La huella del helenismo en el México revolucionario.

Instructor(s): Hugo E Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

[Paideia es una palabra griega que no tiene equivalente en español o en inglés. Significa, simultánea y conjuntamente, civilización, cultura, tradición, literatura y educación].

En este curso vamos a estudiar el heleno-centrismo en la obra (literaria, filosófica, magisterial, cultural y política) de un grupo de intelectuales que tuvieron una notoria influencia en la paideia mexicana revolucionaria (1910-1940). Antonio Caso, Pedro Henríquez Ureña, Alfonso Reyes, José Vasconcelos y demás miembros del "Ateneo de la juventud" fueron los artífices de un amplio movimiento cultural en contra del positivismo (la filosofía oficial del porfiriato, 1876-1910) y a favor del humanismo (cuyo origen y fuente espiritual es la paideia griega). Estos intelectuales buscaban no sólo fomentar la cultura de las humanidades en México sino que anhelaban la realización de los ideales de la paideia griega tanto en México como en toda América Latina. Su humanismo de izquierda fue institucionalizado en México durante los gobiernos de Obregón, Calles y Cárdenas y rindió valiosos y diversos frutos en la literatura, la filosofía, las artes, la arquitectura y la educación.

En este curso vamos a estudiar no sólo la huella del helenismo en la paideia del México revolucionario en general y en la obra de los ateneístas en particular (especialmente la de Reyes y Vasconcelos) sino que también realizaremos una evaluación crítica de los presupuestos ideológicos del heleno-centrismo transculturado que estos intelectuales abrazaron y promovieron.

Este curso es de lectura intensiva. Habrá dos exámenes parciales en el transcurso del semestre y se pedirá un trabajo de investigación y análisis al final del semestre.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 635. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 656. Studies in 19th Century Spanish Literature.

Section 001 Representations of Nation, and Representations of Woman in Spanish 19th Century Literature

Instructor(s): Manuel Camarero

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers a reflection on nationalism and Spanish 19th century literature, and representations of woman in Spanish Romanticism by examining representative works of Spanish 19th century literature from costumbrismo to Realism.

Students will follow discussions in class on a variety of topics:

  • Origins of the concept of 'nation'.
  • Middle class, nation and nationalism.
  • Representations of nation in Spanish 19th century literature.
  • Towards a typology of representations of woman: types, and archetypes.
  • The misogynist representation.
  • The erotic representation: sexuality, sexism, and voyeurism.
  • The idealization of woman.
  • The sensible/sensitive woman.
  • Man-made/woman-made representations.

    TEXTBOOKS

  • Antología comentada de la Literatura española. Siglo XIX, by Andrés Amorós (Madrid: Editorial Castalia)
  • Escenas y tipos matritenses, by Ramón de Mesonero Romanos (Madrid: Ediciones Cátedra)
  • Don Juan Tenorio, by José Zorrilla (Madrid: Editorial Castalia)
  • Antología poética de escritoras del siglo XIX (Madrid: Editorial Castalia)
  • La Gaviota, by Fernán Caballero (Madrid: Editorial Castalia)
  • Pepita Jiménez, by Juan Valera (Madrid: Ediciones Cátedra)
  • Tormento, by Benito Pérez Galdós (Madrid: Alianza Editorial)

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 855. Special Topics Seminar.

    Section 001 MESTIZAJE AND NATIONAL IDENTITY IN LATIN AMERICA. Meets with LACS 619.001.

    Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu) , Julie Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This interdisciplinary proseminar is intended for graduate students from a variety of fields interested in the history and representation of nation formation in post-independence Latin America. Bringing together historical, literary, and ethnographic approaches, we will examine how gendered discourses of mestizaje, or racial mixing, have played a central role in the promotion and contestation of homogenizing nationalist projects since the late nineteenth century. The equation of national identity with ethnic fusion has had profound and contradictory effects on diverse arenas of cultural, economic, and political life, giving rise to social conflict and changing representations of identity. Our readings will relate discussions of nationalism, gender, and postcolonial studies to cases taken from a range of countries, including Peru, Bolivia, Mexico, Venezuela, and Cuba. The class will utilize a variety of materials, including novels, essays, monographs, films and visual images, and will include presentations by visiting speakers.

    Student evaluation will be based on class participation, commentaries, and a final paper.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 873. Seminar in the Modern Spanish Novel.

    Section 001 Beyond Spain: Contemporary Fiction, Film, and the Reimagination of the Spanish Nation.

    Instructor(s): Nathan Richardson

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    In this course we will examine the current state of the Spanish nation through an investigation of the concept of nation and community as manifest in narrative fiction and film. Theoretical readings related to questions of nation/community/identity will focus in particular on physical structures, inviting us to consider representations of geography, architecture, space, and place within the narrative works being studied, as well as considering these works as participating in the ongoing construction of a spatial unconscious. We will apply these ideas for the most part to critically acclaimed films and novels, representative of major aesthetic trends of the last half-century in Spain. In this respect, the course may also be approached as an introduction to principal figures, works, and issues of narrative and cinema in Spain today. Readings for the course include seven novels to be read before the designated class, several in-class movies, and accompanying theoretical readings. Assignments include weekly participation, two short papers (5-7 pp.), and a final research paper (approx. 15 pp.).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 895. Independent Study.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    SPANISH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

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    SPANISH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a Doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


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