College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in CAAS


This page was created at 6:36 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

Search the LS&A Course Guide
(Advanced Search Page)

CAAS 405 / ANTHRARC 400. Field Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (8). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Anthropological Archaeology 400.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 406 / ANTHRARC 401. Archaeology Laboratory Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing; concurrent enrollment in CAAS 405. (6). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Anthropological Archaeology 401.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Cross-Area Courses). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (CAAS 410 or 510), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, a permission number will be issued.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

CAAS 422 / ANTHRCUL 411. African Culture.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

Prerequisites: Junior standing. CAAS 200 recommended. (3). (African Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 411.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 442 / FILMVID 442. Third World Cinema.

Afro-Caribbean Studies

Section 001 Third World Cinema.

Instructor(s): Frances K Gateward (gateward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). (Afro-Caribbean Studies). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 442.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CAAS 451. Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald C Woods (rcwoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: CAAS 201 and 450 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/451/001.nsf

This course is the second half of a two-course sequence on the constitutional and legal history of African Americans. It covers the phase of this history beginning with the advent of the Modern Civil Rights Movement and extending to the present. In this course, we will approach law as an institution which is constantly shaping and being shaped by the cultural, economic, political, and social environments around it. In looking at the interaction between law, race, and historical process in the latter half of the twentieth century, the course will explore the reciprocal relationship between law and the societal order, the role of law in the philosophical and social discourse of African Americans, and the function of law in the developmental strategies adopted by them. This course will routinely examine the constitutional and legal experience of African Americans as a case study in how ideas are transformed by historical forces in malleable principles of law.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 454 / ANTHRCUL 453. African-American Culture.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in the social sciences. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 453.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 Space, Arch & AfrAmer Identity. [3 Credits]. Meets with American Culture 498.001 and ARCH 409.053

Instructor(s): Magdalena J Zaborowska, Coleman Austin Jordan

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/amcult/498/001.nsf

See American Culture 498.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 Comparing Black Aesthetics: Black Drama and Theatre in the U.S., the Caribbean, and Africa. Meets with Theatre 4040.001.

Instructor(s): Dieudonné-Christophe Mbala Nkanga

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be devoted in exploring the major developments in the aesthetic experience of Black Drama and Theatre in the U.S., the West Indies, and Africa. Through the reading of plays (some in class) and critical materials, viewing videos and films, students will consider, question, and compare the experience of domination, colonialism, post-colonialism, and emancipation of the Black people in this geographical space as expressed by various playwrights and artists of African descent over the last fifty years. The playwrights in consideration for this course are: Ama Ata Aidoo, Amiri Baraka, Aime Cesaire, Sony Labou Tansi, Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, and August Wilson.

In addition to these playwrights, students will question essays and other critical and historical materials by writers such as DuBois, Asante, Appiah, Gates, Soyinka, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, and Jeyifo, as they pertain to Blackness and its expression. The course will combine historical perspectives and theatre and performance criticism approaches.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 003 SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY OF UNDERDEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA.

Instructor(s): Denis C Ugwuegbu

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

When economists discuss the development of Africa, they often forget the psychological component of social and economic development. "The Psychology of Underdevelopment in Africa" is a seminar course that is designed to lead students through lectures, discussions, and demonstrations to explore the psychological causes of the contemporary underdevelopment of the nations of Africa. Emphasis will be placed on the behavioral aspect of development, and will cover topics such as colonial underdevelopment policies in Africa, neo-colonial theories of development, the new nations of Africa and their alternative plan for development, and psychological principles of development.

Special considerations will be given to topics such as attitudes, motivation, and trust and development. Finally, the place of education and human resources planning as important aspects of development efforts will be examined.

Since this course will attract students with various educational backgrounds, students who are ready to make insightful and innovative contributions to the understanding of the causes and possible eradication of development problems of Africa are encouraged to register for it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 005 Higher Education and African-American Social Development in the 21st Century.

Instructor(s): Larry Rowley

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/458/005.nsf

This course is an upper-division undergraduate elective that will examine selective aspects of higher education and its relationship to the African-American community. Emphasis will be given to the role that higher education has historically played in the social, economic, and political development of African Americans with a view toward its role in the twenty-first century. American higher education will be examined primarily as a major social institution that continues to grapple with the difficult issues of race. The required text will provide the broad contours of the course and the conceptual framework for analyzing and exploring the social function of higher education. These texts will be supplemental with journal articles and excerpts from other books that deal with several major issues that are currently of concern to African Americans in higher education (e.g., issues of race and wealth, affirmative action, standardized testing, and urban educational challenges).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 006 Reproductive Health, Gender, and Politics in Africa: A Southern Africa Perspective. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Shingairai Feresu (sferesu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/458/006.nsf

This course will consider reproductive health of women, gender inequalities, and politics of health in Africa with a special focus on Southern Africa.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 007 Blacks, Indians & Making of America. Meets with AMCULT 496.004.

Instructor(s): Tiya A Miles

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 496.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 476 / ENGLISH 478. Contemporary Afro-American Literature.

African-American Studies

Section 001 Black Narrative and the Politics of Mobility. Satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Sandra R Gunning (sgunning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 478.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of instructor required.

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 Remembering Babylon: Caribbean/Canadian Writing [African Diaspora]. Meets Jan 15-Feb 19. [1 credit]. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Michael Bucknor (mikebuck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (1-2). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Mini/short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course investigates the ways in which Afro-Caribbean cultures mark inter-national/diasporic spaces.

For Marlene Nourbese-Philip,

"when the African came to the New World she brought with her nothing but her body and all the memory and history which [provided] all the tools necessary for spiritual and cultural survival" ("Managing the Unmanageable" 298).

It is not surprising, then, that

"African and, later, Caribbean peoples, [uprooted] from their past, have had to rely on their body-memories and on a performative oral tradition that initiates recall of their cultural heritage . . . . Ritual performance in song, dance, oral story-telling has been the main means of recovering and preserving those memories stored in the body" (Bucknor "Body-vibes" 309).

By examining the literary text as a material embodiment of cultural practice, the course will allow us to trace the ways in which Caribbean/Canadian writing inserts an African presence in Canada. In this half course, we will pay particular attention to the performative resources of Afro-Caribbean culture that are used as "tools of survival" in the Babylons of past home countries and present host societies. The term "Babylon" is retrieved from Rastafarian "Dread Talk" and is the archetypal trope that describes oppressive regimes predicated on hegemony. Babylonian hegemonies related to race, class, culture, gender, and sexuality are interrogated using these African-diasporic traditions. Both Barbadian/Canadian Austin Clarke (who chronicles the experience of the domestic workers who came to Canada in the 1950s in his pioneering novel, The Meeting Point) and Jamaican/Canadian Lillian Allen (who uses her dub poetry collection, Women Do This Everyday, to focus on issues affecting Caribbean women in the diaspora) employ the African-diasporic oral/expressive resources to "chant down" Babylons past and present. This course, with an emphasis on Afro-Caribbean retention, comparatively examines the performative structures of two writers of the Caribbean and demonstrates the significant impact of Afro-Caribbean cultural expressions on other diasporic cultures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 Modern African Diaspora in Western Cities. March 5-April 2 [1 Credit]. [Drop/Add deadline=March 11].

Instructor(s): Charles Tshimanga-Kashama (ckashama@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (1-2). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Mini/short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course deals with the history of the Modern African diaspora in European and North American cities. The objective of the course is to analyze the Modern African diaspora in several major cities Paris, Brussels, Charlotte (North Carolina) and explore its complexity and the many strategies African youth have adopted to recreate their imagined communities. Special emphasis is put on the emergence of African popular cultures in these cities. The dress codes of these youth, their recreative activities, popular music, and linguistic fabrications are intriguing phenomena that open new stimulating perspectives for historical inquiry. They help us to understand the different aspects of the global African diaspora. The course will be run as a seminar, with group discussions freely mixed with short lectures, guest lecturers, film discussions, and brief student presentations.

Required Texts:

  • Scott, James. 1990. Domination and the Arts of Resistance, New Haven-London: Yale University Press.
  • Okpewho, Isidore Boyce Davies, Carole & Mazrui Ali. 1999. The African Diaspora. African Origins and New World Identities. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.

Films: Mobutu, Roi du Zaïre (Mobutu, King of Zaire) and Pièces d'identité (ID card).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 510. Supervised Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of CAAS 510, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual study under the direction of a departmental staff member. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

CAAS 519 / POLSCI 619. African Americans and the Politics of Race.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vincent L Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 521 / SOC 521. African American Intellectual Thought.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alford A Young Jr (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior standing. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to explore some debates and arguments constructed by African American scholars on the "Negro Problem." The objective will be to ascertain how African American scholarly debate and commentary has framed definitions of, and has posed solutions for, the social condition of the African American community throughout the twentieth century. More specifically, we will consider how these scholars framed their arguments within larger intellectual and disciplinary frameworks. In doing so, we will attend to the historical contexts that circumscribe these arguments. This course will involve seminar-style discussion. Students will be evaluated on a research paper that explores some dimension of African American scholarly inquiry on a social issue of pertinence to Black Americans. There also will be brief written assignments that will facilitate the development of the term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 557 / MUSICOL 557. The Music of Black Americans.

African-American Studies

Section 001 Meets with CAAS 457.001.

Instructor(s): Travis A. Jackson (travieso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/musicol/457/001.nsf

This course is a survey of the varied musics made by African Americans from slavery to the present. Particular attention will be devoted to the relation of musical style and performance to changing historical, social, philosophical, technological and cultural conditions. Students, while not required to read music, will be expected to develop listening skills in order to distinguish genres, performance styles, and recording techniques.

Students will be evaluated on the basis of two non-cumulative examinations, listening assignments coordinated with class readings, concert reports and a research paper.

Required Materials:

  • A coursepack containing some of the readings for this course is available at Accu-Copy, located at 518 E. William (769-8338).
  • All other readings are in the two required texts for the course available from Shaman Drum, 313 S. State Street (662-7407):
    • Floyd, Samuel A., Jr. 1995. The Power of Black Music: Interpreting Its History from Africa to the United States. New York: Oxford University Press.
    • Small, Christopher. 1998. Music of the Common Tongue: Survival and Celebration in Afro-American Music. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press.
Grading: Online Discussions 15% Class Participation and Attendance 15% Paper Proposal 10% Research Paper 20% Midterm Examination 20% Final Examination 20%

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 004 Meaning & Representation AfricanAmerican Music &Culture. MEETS WITH AMCULT 699.002.

Instructor(s): Paul A Anderson

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 699.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 007 Anthropology of Music. Meets with Anthro 558

Instructor(s): Kelly M Askew (kaskew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 558.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 595 / HISTORY 595. Topics in African History.

African Studies

Section 001 Rise&Fall of Apartheid State. Meets with History 357.001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: CAAS 200 recommended. (3). (African Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/595/001.nsf

See History 595.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 595 / HISTORY 595. Topics in African History.

African Studies

Section 002 Law&Society in Colonial World. Meets with History 357.002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: CAAS 200 recommended. (3). (African Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/357/002.nsf

See History 595.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 596 / NRE 596. History of Environmental Thought and Activism.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 Meets with ENVIRON 396.001.

Instructor(s): Dorceta Taylor (dorceta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate Standing. It is highly desirable for students to have taken differential and integral calculus. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/nre/396/001.nsf

This course uses a race, class, and gender approach to examine the history of American environmental activism (1850-present). It identifies the major periods of environmental mobilization and significant forms of environmental activism among the white middle class, white working class, and people of color. The course also examines the way in which a persons' social class, race, gender, environmental, and labor market experiences influence their environmental perceptions and the kinds of environmental ideologies they develop. The course examines the rise of major environmental paradigms, environmental justice, and the factors that make them influential.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 786 / HISTORY 786. Seminar in African History.

African Studies

Section 001 Colonial/PostColonial Africa.

Instructor(s): Mamadou Diouf (mdiouf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 786.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 798 / HISTORY 798. Seminar in Comparative Studies in History.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 A Research Practicum.

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 798.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 828 / DOC 828. Human, Economic, and Community Development.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 Black Church and Faith-Based Human Development, Economic Empowerment, Community Revitalization. Meets with SOC 895.003.

Instructor(s): Wallace Jr

Prerequisites: Doctoral standing and Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for CAAS.


Page


This page was created at 6:36 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2003 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.