College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Cultural Anthropology


This page was created at 8:30 PM on Thu, Jan 23, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)


ANTHRCUL 403. Japanese Society and Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer E Robertson (jennyrob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a multi-media course designed to introduce and explore the salient patterns in and of (mostly post-WW2) Japanese society and culture. Our overall aim is to appreciate the ways in which Japanese women and men, girls and boys from punks and theatre fans to police officers and office workers construe, construct, communicate, reproduce, and resist everyday practices and realities. We will also challenge and transcend parochial stereotypes of Japan (of Japanese and Euro-American invention alike). Japan warrants closer attention by Americans and for more reasons than the wild success of animation (anime'), Nintendo, and Pokemon in their everyday lives. Long characterized in the popular and scholarly media as the "cultural opposite" of the United States for example, "the Japanese" are homogeneous, more polite, less litigious, less violent (but more suicidal), and more tuned to nature than "the Americans" people are understandably surprised to learn that Japan was a powerful empire in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; that it has a long history of social unrest and feminist activism; that it is a multi-ethnic society; that its mass media thrive on gratuitous sex and violence; and that its environment is one of the most polluted in the capitalist world. Rather than casting Japan and the U.S. as opposites, it is more productive to understand the various forces and circumstances out of which institutions such as the constitution, educational system, racism, consumerism, health care, popular entertainment, the police, etc. emerged and were shaped in each society. This then, is our mission: to look carefully and closely at those Japanese social structures, institutions and practices that either closely resemble or greatly deviate from those of mainstream America so that we can simultaneously learn how to understand better the complexities of American culture and society which is far more than just the "opposite" of everything Japan represents. Ditto Japan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 404. Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): E Webb Keane Jr (wkeane@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ANTHRCUL 101 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Southeast Asia is marked by enormous diversity in everything from ecology to political systems. Long a dynamic cross-road between the Indian Ocean and the Pacific, the region is socially and culturally complex. Today, for example, it includes important groups of all the world's major religions. Indonesia, the world's fourth largest country, is home to the largest Islamic population within a single national border; the Philippines, whose complicated special relationship with the United States dates back to the nineteenth century, is predominantly Catholic. In the background to these large nation-states are hundreds of distinct traditions and languages, including the royal courts of Java, the ritual systems of Hindu Bali, hunting-based societies of the Borneo forests, and rice-farming villages of Malaysia, as well as significant diasporic communities such as urban Chinese entrepreneurs. Interacting with these are sprawling mega-cities and multi-national industrial enclaves. This course will approach the region by way of selected case studies, through the reading of ethnographic monographs. Our focus will be on island Southeast Asia (Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, East Timor). This course is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 411 / CAAS 422. African Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

Prerequisites: Junior standing. CAAS 200 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of tropical (sub-Saharan) Africa. Topics covered include: ecology, environment, and population; precolonial and colonial origins of the social structure and social organization of contemporary African states; family and kinship; religion, music and the arts; race, gender, class, ethnicity, and cultural and national identity; African migration; politics and policies of social change and economic development. The course is open to both anthropology concentrators and non-concentrators. Grades are based on four 5-6 page, type-written, take-home papers, and contributions to class discussion. Film/videos shown in class when available.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 417. Indians of Mexico and Guatemala.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joyce Marcus (joymar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ANTHRCUL 101, 222, or junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lecture course provides an overview of Indian groups occupying Mexico and Guatemala. Groups include the Maya, Nahuatl (Aztec), Zapotec, Mixtec, Huichol, Mixe, Tarascans, etc. Course will focus on social and political organization, world view and religion, subsistence, settlement patterns, etc. Comparisons and contrasts between groups will be made in an effort to determine shared ancestry, the borrowing of various practices, the domination of one group over another, and independent developments. Two required papers (midterm and final) constitute course grade. No prerequisite.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 429. Television, Society, and Culture.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Conrad P Kottak (ckottak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Television has been compared to a new religion, cultivating homogeneity, uniting adherents in a common set of images and symbols. Television executives, commentators, and reporters have become "key gatekeepers" assuming roles played historically by political and religious leaders. TV has been labeled "narcoticizing" and faulted for diverting attention from serious social issues and replacing effective thought and action with passive absorption in portrayals. Television has been said to reinforce existing hierarchies and impede social reform. It also stimulates participation in a worldwide cash economy, and TV's worldwide spread has raised concerns about cultural imperialism. Ethnocentrism is common in the evaluation of television and its effects. Understanding of TV impact can be broadened through a cross-cultural approach to this medium, which, specific content and programming aside, must be recognized as one of the most powerful information disseminators, socializing agents, and public-opinion molders in the contemporary world.

This seminar will consider cross-cultural diversity in TV and will assess the medium's various social, cultural, and psychological dimensions and effects. Students, who will include seniors, concentrators and graduate students in American Culture, Communication, Anthropology, and other related fields will each investigate an aspect of television. Students will be responsible for attending class, organizing and participating in discussions of particular readings, and presenting, orally to the class and in writing, a term paper based on research concerning some aspect of TV impact.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 439. Economic Anthropology and Development.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to economic anthropology and development in rural, village-based, tribal, peasant, urbanizing and industrializing societies and cultures of the Third World: Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Middle East. The FIRST PART reviews the nature of economic anthropology, its scope, objectives, basic concepts, theories and methods of investigation. It discusses economic anthropology as it relates to conventional/development economics. The SECOND PART examines anthropological (social science) perspectives on development and underdevelopment: progress, modernization, acculturation, socioeconomic growth. The THIRD PART is concerned with specific case studies of problems of Third World development and underdevelopment: rural/urban poverty and inequality; women and development; international migration and globalization; etc. The course CONCLUDES with an overview of global issues in Third World development and underdevelopment in a post-cold war environment. The course is recommended for anthropology concentrators and all students with serious interest in comparative cultures and Third World development and underdevelopment. Lecture/discussion format. Films and videos shown in class when available. Final grades based on three take-home papers and contributions to class discussion.

Basic texts: Lucy Mair, Anthropology and Development; and Polly Hill, Development Economics on Trial.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 453 / CAAS 454. African-American Culture.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in the social sciences. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the Afro-American as one example of how humans live. It places distinctive Black behavior within its social context and its history. It reminds of middle-class Jews in Nazi Germany who believed that success would make you full citizens. It ponders that great (although restricted) contributions that African Americans have made to white identity, the U.S. nation and economy, fashion, youth rebellion, gay and women's rights, and entertainment. An understanding of African Americans enlightens the nature of systemic oppression and explains the anomalies of Native America, Jack Johnson, Paul Robeson, Joe Louis, Jackie Robinson, Tiger Woods, Michael Jordan, Venus Williams, W. Arthur Lewis, Toni Morrison, Ralph Bunche, E. Franklin Frazier and many others. This course looks at the future of African-Americans in a millennium in which the memory of their oppressions and reparations seem lost.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Art and the Anthropological Imagination.

Instructor(s): Stephen L Pastner

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Taught by an anthropologist/sculptor, this course focuses on the analysis and production of narrative visual art that derives from, and itself informs, more traditional anthropological and historical scholarship an art genre commonly marginalized by both anthropologists and art-historians. The format of the course will combine lectures, group discussions, formal student presentations and art practicum elements. Evaluation criteria will, for most students, include production of a work of art based on scholarly research, and a paper and presentation describing its genesis and development. However, for the resolutely "left brained" who may wish to forego the art project, additional writing assignments will be possible. There will also be participation in one of several collaborative class presentations and the possibility of one or more exams/quizzes. In addition to the required texts and "course pack", students electing to do an art project should anticipate some art-materials expenses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 Language & Socialization. Meets with Ling 492.005, Psych 551.244, Psych 457.001, and Ling 792.005.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek, Marilyn J Shatz

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on how language use relates to socialization into a group. We will examine this relationship with respect to topics such as identity formation, personhood, socio-economic status, race, and cognition. We will read from the recent literature comparing these various aspects of socialization across different speech communities and then discuss questions such as the following. What kinds of (contextual, linguistic, developmental) constraints impact socialization? What is the nature of and how does the relationship between language and socialization vary across different contexts? Do the levels of analysis in the current research provide reasonable descriptions of both differences and similarities across contexts? We will also discuss where we would like to see future language-socialization research go. Upper-level or graduate student status required. Some background in developmental or cognitive psychology, linguistics, cognitive or linguistic anthropology would be helpful.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 Indigenous Political Movements.

Instructor(s): Stuart A Kirsch

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the prospects and limits of contemporary indigenous political movements. The emergence of the 'indigenous' as a political category and social movement has opened up new politics and debates about alternative forms of sovereignty and resource use in many parts of the world. This course examines the efforts of indigenous peoples to ensure their own physical and cultural survival, as well as to protect their environment. The paradox of their position, however, is that in order to guarantee their rights, they may need to become activists: the maintenance of difference in the political economy of contemporary culture requires movement and translation across cultural, political and geographic boundaries. Working with these activists is a range of actors, each with their own agendas and resulting compromises for the communities that accept their support. Indigenous political movements have the capacity to introduce new ideas into the public domain in a compelling fashion, presenting alternatives to the universalizing discourses of science and capital. Topics may include, but are not limited to: definitions and histories of indigeneity; the politics of culture and representation; debates about sovereignty and special rights; social movements and civil society; alternative notions of space, place and time; the intersection of indigenous politics and global environmentalism; and indigenous knowledge and debates about intellectual and cultural property rights. Examples will be drawn primarily from the Pacific, Southeast Asia and the Americas, with special emphasis on Melanesia and Amazonia. Readings: several monographs and electronic course reserves. Requirements: regular participation, several short papers and a research project and presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 004 Language, Ethnicity, and Nationalism.

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores relationships between language and social groupings such as "tribe," "ethnic group," and "nation." Are such groupings based on shared language? Many Americans and Euopreans assume that communicites are normally monolingual that a common language brings people together, and language differences divide them. Yet, much of the world is multilingual. What do language similarities and differences mean for their speakers' social identities and relationships? We will consider what can be meant by each of our three terms, "language" (when do differences matter for social identities?), "ethnicity" (what is the basis of ethnic identity?), and "nationalism" (what social program is entailed?). Drawing on cross-cultural case studies and historical materials, we seek to understand how linguistic similarities and differencees real or imagined unite or divide people, in practice and in ideology. Readings and discussions will concern topics such as language use in small-scale societies; the functions of multilingualism; the politics of language standardization and the emergence of print media; conceptions of "nation" and "language" in nineteenth-century Europe; the European colonial expansion and its influence on indigenous peoples and languages; and the role of language in debates about national identity, at home and abroad.

In addition to the class discussions and readings that involve the whole class, each student will explore and report on a particular case study. Evaluation will be based on class participation (including discussion-leading and a class presentation), some short writing assignments, an in-class test, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 005 Thinking Across Cultures. Meets with Psych 487.001.

Instructor(s): Scott Atran (satran@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the course, we will evaluate descriptive and experimental treatments of the ways "traditional" concerns in psychology have been explored across cultures. This includes relationships between language and thought, categorization and inference, problem-solving and decision-making. We also will treat cross-cultural research that falls within the emerging frameworks of "domain-specificity" and evolutionary psychology: including, folkphysics, folkpsychology, folkbiology, and folksociology. Finally, we will explore how these insights can illuminate understanding of such pervasive cross-cultural phenomena as religion and environmental cognition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 461 / AMCULT 461 / LING 461. Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/461/001.nsf

This course will explore how Native North American languages are used in relation to the historical circumstances, cultural practices, and social settings of their speakers. Of particular concern is the interrelationship between linguistic practice and ideologies that can either promote or discourage the use (and maintenance) of these languages. We will focus on topics such as the relationship between language and landscape, oral narratives, language and thought, dominant/subordinate language contact situations, sign language, and literacy. No special background is required, but students should have upper-level or graduate student status. Course requirements include preparation for and active participation in discussions, three short book reviews, a midterm exam, and a paper on a topic related to the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 475. Ethnography of Writing.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Examining genres that range from lists to letters and novels, and from contracts to constitutions, this course looks at writing as a cultural practice. The approach is contextual and historical, situating specific forms of writing (and reading) in relation to class, gender, and cultural background, and with respect to precolonial, colonial, nation-state, and transnational settings. While the course criticizes analyses that rely mainly on evolutionary schemes, technological determinisms, or projections of western European history, it advances the tools of a cultural analysis of writing. This approach draws on recent research in linguistic anthropology, adapts ideas from literary criticism and cultural studies, and integrates indigenous theories about texts. Ethnographies of writing and reading are anchored in detailed studies set in several parts of the world, various historical periods, and in contexts such as schools, courts, political arenas, and ordinary life. Topics will include the relation of the spoken and the written, forms of script and print, authors and authority, uses of literacy, and the role of writing in bureaucracy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 527. Traditions of Ethnology II.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): E Webb Keane Jr

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A continuation of Traditions in Ethnology I. It covers the period from about 1950 to the present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Anthropology of Music. Meets with CAAS 558.007.

Instructor(s): Kelly M Askew (kaskew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will consist of an historical overview of anthropological approaches both theoretical and methodological to the comparative study of musical performance. The goal is to understand what contributions anthropologists have made and how they continue to shape research in ethnomusicology. Students will read, discuss, and evaluate a range of perspectives (functional, structural, linguistic, semiotic, phenomenological) on how music can be studied and understood as a social, as well as aural, phenomenon.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 577. Language as Social Action.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ANTHRCUL 576. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/577/001.nsf

Develops a framework for viewing languages as a social, cultural, and political matrix, a form of action through which social relations, cultural forms, ideology, and consciousness are constituted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 632. Comparative Analysis of Kinship.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu) , Thomas E Fricke (tomf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the Winter 2003 academic term, this course will examine current theoretical and methodological issues in the analysis of kinship and religion, using case studies from Africa, Asia, Southeast Asia, Melanesia, Europe, and North America.

In the words of anthropologist Robert McKinley:

"Kinship itself is a moral philosophy. It answers the question of how it is possible for one human being to be morally bound to another. The strength of a kinship system is based on its ability to draw people into this framework of mutual trust."

Yet kin relations may also be fraught with violence, ranging from sacrifice to murder; some would argue that kinship and racism are simply different dimensions of the same phenomenon.

This course will focus on the social processes through which people define, create, extend, limit, seve,r or transform their relatedness with others within and over generations. We will explore how people conceptualize who is, or is not, their own "kin" or "kind" and why; the moral imagination involved in working through the contradictory loyalties characterizing even the most intimate, small-scale relations; where, how, and why people draw the lines between themselves and other forms of organic life; how generative relations are expressed in forms ranging from substances like blood, milk, or semen, to new reproductive technologies and genetic genealogies; and the significance of places in creating, shaping, containing, transforming relations over time.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 640 / HISTORY 603. Seminar in Anthropology and History.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001 Methods Seminar: Anthropology, History, and the Politics of Comparison. Meets with History 604.003.

Instructor(s): Ann Stoler (astoler@umich.edu), Nancy Rose Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This Core Seminar of the Doctoral Program in Anthropology and History provides a context to examine theory, methods and the craft of social research and writing, focusing on central questions of historiography, ethnography, and their mutual relations. It addresses anthropology's changing engagement with historical research and writing as well as history's involvement with anthropological methods and forms of analysis. This two-term course is mainly intended for students interested in developing projects that integrate historical and anthropological perspectives and methods.

The Winter or Methods Seminar centers on the intensive discussion of classical and important articles and monographs that participate in key moments in the dialogue between these two disciplines or productively question their disciplinary boundaries. This year the colloquium will especially look at new work on race, empire, gender, and the politics of comparison, and use the latter theme to think about possibilities of combining/contrasting methods and sources (as in ethnograpy, archives, and visual culture), and multiple and incongruous sites, contexts, and temporalities.

The Fall or Research Seminar focuses on the craft of writing, based on the careful discussion of papers produced by students taking the course or by invited guests.

The course may be taken as a two-term sequence, or as independent units. Papers written for this course may satisfy the Department of History's Research Seminar requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 640 / HISTORY 603. Seminar in Anthropology and History.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001 Nature and Modernity. Meets with Anthropology 658.001

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu), Sharad Chari (schari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 652. Ethnographic Writing.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course considers the history, politics, and possibilities of ethnographic writing. We will discuss a variety of ethnographic genres, including literary journalism, experimental ethnography, feminist ethnography, travel accounts, the memoir, poetry of witness, investigative reporting, documentary image-texts, the ethnographic novel, and autobiographical criticism. Our focus will be on the dilemmas of writing narratives of place and voice. We will analyze a range of textural strategies, including monologue, dialogue, first person narrative, third person narrative, flashback, different methods of quoting or paraphrasing "informants," and descriptive accounts of other places. In addition to familiarizing ourselves with these literary genres and textual strategies, I want to provide a workshop environment for members of the class to strengthen their own writing and embark on major ethnographic projects of their own. Students often say the don't get opportunities to try their hand at ethnographic writing before embarking on fieldwork. I hope this course will fill that need by providing a foundation for the production of more creative daring, and original writing that can speak to and beyond the academy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Nature and Modernity. Meets with History 604.001.

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu), Sharad Chari (schari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What are subaltern perspectives on modernity and how could they transform our understanding of its nature? How do considerations of space, place, nature, postcoloniality, and difference alter metropolitan understandings of the experience of modern life? How would subaltern perspectives transform classical radical critiques of political economy and their way of characterizing the specific dynamics of societies in which the primary form of producing wealth is through the role of capital and labor in the production of commodities? This course ventures through a variety of approaches that question the constitutive exclusions and the social, cultural, and spatial foundations of social life under capitalism. We begin with geographical critiques of Western Marxism that seek to integrate the spatial and temporal dialectics that underwrite the development of capitalism. We then turn to a series of subaltern critiques of the metropolitanism of this tradition: thinking through the countryside, the gendered/familial subject, the colony, the rentier postcolony and its cultural and political dynamics, the raced workplace and the wasted landscapes of postsocialist capitalism. Through selected theoretical works and historical and ethnographic studies, the course intends to illuminate modernity through the development of decentered, subaltern perspectives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 760 / PSYCH 689. Culture and Cognition.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lawrence A Hirschfeld (lhirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/689/001.nsf

This seminar is part of an interdisciplinary program initiated by the Departments of Anthropology and Psychology. The seminar includes both students and faculty. In it we will explore how the cultural environment influences, and is influenced by, reasoning and other psychological processes. The cognitive revolution has been based upon the tacit assumption that all humans have the same basic cognitive structures and functions, and that cultures and other social contexts contribute only peripherally important content differences. Anthropologists have long argued that both the content and function of knowledge may be strongly linked to the types of problems that a given culture or social group must habitually solve. The seminar will focus on ways in which cognition may be culturally mediated, socially situated, and contingent on historical forces. Recent research in the field will be presented and discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 760 / PSYCH 689. Culture and Cognition.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Nisbett

Prerequisites: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 777. Lingusitic Anthropology Laboratory.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Anthropology or a Related Discipline. (1-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 825 / HISTORY 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ANTHRCUL 957. Research Practicum in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ANTHRCUL 958. Anthropological Research.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ANTHRCUL 959. Survey of Literature on Selected Topics.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ANTHRCUL 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Advanced Doctoral student. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ANTHRCUL 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Doctoral candidate. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


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