College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Asian Studies


This page was created at 8:06 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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ASIAN 455. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Twila Z Tardif

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/457/002.nsf

See Psychology 457.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

ASIAN 455. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 002 History of Hinduism. Meets with History 472.002

Instructor(s): Donald Davis Jr (drdj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/asian/455/002.nsf

How can Hinduism be both one of the oldest and one of the newest major religious traditions of the world? By examining the work of four periods in the history of Hindu Studies, we will trace the evolution behind how we learn about Hinduism today and how our knowledge differs from early studies of the same religious tradition. The course will center on the differing sources available for studying Hinduism (ethnography, literature, epigraphy, colonial records, art, artifacts, etc.) and how these sources have been used or ignored by scholars, colonial officials, and politicians in India. Individualized library projects will play off the representative periods studied in class and will be designed to question the ways in which our knowledge of Hinduism is and has been organized and how that organization has affected both public and academic perceptions of Hinduism.

Classes will incorporate a mixture of discussions, films, multimedia lectures, and library research. Requirements will include a short paper, a research paper, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

ASIAN 455. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 003 Sacred Text & History in India. Meets with History 472.003.

Instructor(s): Donald Davis Jr (drdj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/asian/455/003.nsf

The sacred texts of India contain great insight into the distinctive religious and philosophical heritage f South Asia. By taking both sympathetic and critical perspectives on important Hindu texts, this course will survey how these texts can also be used to interpret the history of South Asian religion, law, economy, politics, and society. Emphasis will be on learning to read sacred texts critically and contextually in the light of other historical evidence. The texts will include selections from the Rg-Veda, the Upanisads, the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, the Puranas, and the Dharmasastras . However, individual projects can focus on Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, Muslim, or Sikh scriptures. After examining the nature of scripture in South Asia, the course will center on important historical problems and the use of sacred literature to clarify those problems. Throughout the course, we will question the propriety and limitations of writing history from sacred texts both in South Asia and comparative literature.

Classes will consist primarily of guided discussions, but will also include some brief lectures and library training. The requirements for the course will include reading response papers, a research paper, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

ASIAN 472. The Korean War.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry H Em (henryem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/asian/472/001.nsf

What were the origins of the Korean War? How did Japanese colonial rule (1910-1945) followed by Soviet and American occupation (1945-1948) impact Korean society and politics in the years leading up to the Korean War (1950-1953)? How did class, gender, and ethnicity affect the way civilians and combatants experienced the war? The main focus of this course will be on the origins of the Korean War as a civil war, but we will also examine its international dimensions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

ASIAN 487. Buddhism in India: Its Doctrines and History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gómez

Prerequisites: ASIAN 230. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 489. Korean Buddhism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eun-Su Cho (eunsucho@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ASIAN 220 or 230. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course surveys the development of Buddhism in Korea from the third century to the present. It will begin with the introduction the doctrines and practices of Chinese Buddhism which hold an important place in the Korean tradition, while examining the transmission and assimilation of Buddhism into Korea. It includes the progression of the development of Korean Buddhism - the rise of sects, indigenous ideas, and the continuity/ discontinuity from the earlier development in China. Focusing on the major thinkers such as Wonhyo, Chinul and others, we will evaluate their contributions to the development of Buddhist doctrines in the East Asia. We will examine the rise of syncretic interpretation of Buddhist ideas in the Choson dynasty as a means of survival during the harsh climate Confucian ideology. We will also consider the Buddhist response to the Japanese advances during the occupation (1905-1945), and will examine the revival of Buddhism in the country as part of rise in nationalistic fervor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

ASIAN 491. Topics in Japanese Studies.

Section 001 Violence Against Women, Law, and Social Policy in Japan. Meets Jan. 27 - March 3. Meets with Social Work 733. [Drop/Add deadline=January 31].

Instructor(s): Yoshihama Tsunoda, Mieko Yoshihama

Prerequisites: (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

he Course will be taught by Yoshihama Tsunoda, a Center for Japanese Studies Toyota Visiting Professor, Winter 2003 and Lawyer, Tanaka & Partners, Shizuoka, Japan, specializing in gender discrimination and domestic violence; as well as Mieko Yoshihama, Associate Professor, School of Social Work. This course will examine social policies, social services, the legal system, and social movements concerning violence against women in Japan, in particular domestic violence and sexual harassment. Violence against women is prevalent across cultural and national boundaries and takes many forms; it represents a system of oppression and control shaped by and resulting in hierarchies of power that are gendered and maintained through socio-cultural, economic, political, and judiciary means. Through an ongoing analysis of interlocking systems of oppression, power, and control, the course examines the ways in which the patriarchy and the Emperor System supports violence against women, which in turn contributes to the maintenance of these systems. To aid this analysis, the course will review a) theoretical work on social problems, social change, violence against women, and feminist jurisprudence, b) empirical studies of violence against women, and c) legislation, administrative/governmental, and legal documents.This course is an integrative seminar designed for graduate and upper-class undergraduate students. To promote critical and reflective thinking and analysis, this course will employ a variety of pedagogical strategies, including small group discussions, videos, and experiential exercises, along with didactic lectures. For more information, please contact the Center for Japanese Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 001 Who are the 'Midnight's Children': Flashbacks and Projections. Meets Jan. 11-March 8. [2 credits]. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Poonam Arora (parora@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/asian/492/001.nsf

This course will delineate the cultural, political and religious background to contemporary South Asia through a thematically curated film series. With the RSC production of Midnight's Children as the centerpiece, the film series will introduce audiences to artistic interpretations of historical events in the medium of film. The introductions and Q&A accompanying the screenings will lay the foundation for a complex understanding of how popular cinema may indirectly contribute to widespread public perceptions of historical events and political trends. The course will be accompanied by a website where public discussion will be facilitated. Stills from films, other visual resources, essays, newspaper articles and links to related sites will also be provided on the website. http://www.umich.edu/~iinet/csas/events/midnightsfilmseries.htm

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

ASIAN 499. Independent Study-Directed Readings.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ASIAN 650. Seminar in Asian Studies.

Section 001 Modern Korean History.

Instructor(s): Henry H Em (henryem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/asian/650/001.nsf

In this seminar we will examine problems in modern Korean historiography. While the readings focus on major and recent work in English, I will also introduce major works in Korean when appropriate. We will discuss these works against the backgrop of recent theoretical considerations. Ability to read scholarly materials in Korean is not a requirement for taking the seminar. Students will be asked to write three short papers in response to the readings. For the seminar paper, due at the end of the semester, students will be asked to examine some problems in modern Korean historiography.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

ASIAN 798. MA Essay SSEA Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Center MA Students. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Master's Essay is a substantial research paper reflecting interdisciplinary training and the ability to use Western language literature and SSEA language sources. The thesis is usually undertaken in the last term of the degree program, under the supervision of two Center faculty. Students in the joint degree programs should refer to the appropriate sections in the handbook for additional requirements specific to their program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ASIAN 799. Master's Essay in Japanese Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Master's student in Asian Studies. Graduate Standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students electing the thesis track must complete the Master's Essay. The Master's Essay is a substantial research paper reflecting interdisciplinary training and the ability to use Western language literature and Japanese language sources. The thesis is usually undertaken in the last term of the degree program, under the supervision of two Center faculty. Students in the joint degree programs should refer to the appropriate sections in the CJS handbook for additional requirements specific to their program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


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