College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies


This page was created at 8:31 PM on Thu, Jan 23, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)


AAPTIS 404. Advanced Modern Standard Arabic II.

Arabic: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mohssen Esseesy (esseesym@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 403. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course exposes student to a variety of reading and speaking activities, listening comprehension passages, and controlled and free writing exercises. Through this exposure, students learn to analyze and use the Arabic language in step with the linguistic realities of contemporary Arab societies. Following the communicative approach in language teaching, this course equally emphasizes the four primary language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening). Students are expected to work independently, with a classmate, or in a group on projects (depending on the nature of the task at hand). Additionally, grammar and vocabulary receive their due share in this course.

In class, students will hold discussions, participate in role-playing activities, read and analyze texts, and communicate using the target language regularly. Outside of class, students are provided with regular homework exercises, expected to write journals, prepare for the following class, and listen to passages. To reinforce what is learned from the textbook, the instructor will supplement the required text with videos and reading materials that relate to the topics covered in the book.

This is the second course of Modern Standard Arabic at the intermediate level. Therefore, students registered for this course are expected to have completed at least two years of Modern Standard Arabic at the elementary and intermediate levels and one term at the advanced level (or their equivalent) prior to their enrollment.

Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to read and write several paragraphs on familiar and less-familiar topics. Also, they are expected to describe and narrate in different time frames, provide a short presentation (perhaps two, depending on the size the class) on a topic of interest, and be able to listen and comprehend news reports that include factual information, narrations, descriptions, and short lectures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 432. Arabic Phonology and Morphophonology.

Linguistics: Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mohssen Esseesy (esseesym@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year of Arabic. Taught in English. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course aims at teaching either an undergraduate student concentrating in Arabic or a graduate student in the Department of Near Eastern. The primary focus of this course is to cover two important subcomponents of Arabic grammar: phonology and morphology. Phonological analysis begins with a study of Arabic phonemes and their representation, and continues into syllable structure, syllabification, and word stress. Phonological processes such as neutralization, assimilation, ishmaam, idghaam, and imaalah are explained. Morphological analysis includes two divisions of morphology: derivational and inflectional. This part of the course begins with the study of the root and pattern morphemes, verb and noun morphology, affixation, compounding, iraabb and binaa?

A historical introduction on the development of Arabic from its Proto-Semitic ancestry is included to place this linguistic study within its proper context. The approach used in the linguistic analysis is descriptive and theory neutral. Readings in this course are primarily in English, however, some literature is read in Arabic as well. There will be assignments, a topical paper, a presentation, and in-class examinations. A minimum prerequisite for this course is one year of Modern Standard Arabic. Prior study of linguistics is not required but is strongly recommended.

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AAPTIS 468. Islamic Law.

Islamic Studies and Near Eastern History

Section 001 Meets with Law 812.001.

Instructor(s): Sherman A Jackson (sajackso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Taught in English. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce students to classical Islamic legal theory and the main contours of positive law in the Sunni and Shiite traditions. The seminal controversies and developments of the "formative period" will be explored, reading into an examination of the full-blown schools of law in the "post-formative" era. We will examine such key issues as ijihâd versus taqlîd, the madhhab (or school of law), the legal responsum (fatwa) legal ecclecticism. In addition, a number of areas of positive law will be examined, e.g., marriage, divorce, abortion, child custody, and criminal law. We will also look at developments in Islamic legal thinking in modern times, including some legal responsa (in translation) to some important modern controversies. All required readings will be in English. Two exams and a term paper.

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AAPTIS 474 / ARMENIAN 416. An Introduction to Modern Armenian Literature.

Armenian Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kevork B Bardakjian (kbar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Armenian Studies 416.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 488. History of Arabic Literature in English.

Arabic Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Trevor Legassick (tleg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The texts for this course will be materials in English translation. Introductory lectures will briefly describe the essential features of the Arabic language and the cultural and geographic area to which it gives expression. Readings and discussions will progress in chronological order from pre-Islamic to modern times. The odes of the poets of pre-Islamic Arabia and their roles in their society will be discussed. The fables of Bidpai, translated from Persian by Ibn al-Muqaffa and encompassing moralistic tales of Kalila and Dimna, will be seen to mark the introduction of prose in Arabic. The Qur'an and the biographical literature relating to the life and personality of the Prophet will be examined in detail. Excerpts from both the poetry and the prose of the classical period, including reference to the early Arab geographers and scientists will illustrate the values and concerns of Arab-Islamic civilization. The Arabian Nights, although introduced into popular Arabic culture towards the end of the Baghdad caliphate from eastern origins, will be seen to exemplify many aspects of Arab culture over extended periods of time and place. The contact and clash between Arab and Western cultures since the early 19th century will be seen to have given rise to new forms of literary expression in contemporary Arabic literature.

Regular class attendance and participation in discussions. Presentation of essays to the class. Five essays will be required and will give evidence of close readings of the assigned texts and the use of supplementary materials.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AAPTIS 502. Advanced Arabic Readings in Special Subjects.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raji M Rammuny (raram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 501. Taught in Arabic. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is open for advanced students who plan to use Arabic for academic and research purposes. It follows content-based, learner-centered methodology. Students select the topics in which they are interested, read 15-20 pages every week before class, and then prepare written summary reports to be presented in class followed by discussion. This course aims to develop analytical study skills, including critical reading and listening, as well as effective writing and oral presentation. Grades will be based on weekly written reports, class attendance and participation, a final group project, and an oral interview.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 541. Classical Persian Texts.

Persian-Iranian Literature and Culture in Persian

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Shayan Afshar (afshar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Persian 242 or 243. Taught in English. (3). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course involves the reading and literary analysis of texts from major authors of the classical period (ca. 950-1500) and includes basic skills in reading aloud and the use of the rules of prosody in scansion and interpretation of poetry texts. It will include shorter or longer passages from such poets as Firdawsi, Nizami, Rumi, Sa'di, and Hafiz according to the interests of the class and the instructor. There is a midterm and final exams. The texts are in the form of a photocopied course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 553. Modern Turkish Readings.

Turkish: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gerjan van Schaaik (schaaik@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Turkish 252 or 255. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Since this course is part of the departmental sequence in modern Turkish, admission to it is dependent on satisfactory completion of Turkish 252 or its equivalent as determined by the instructor. It is designed to further develop reading and comprehension competence in a variety of modern Turkish styles; newspaper and learned articles, political tracts, government publications, etc. The method of instruction is through recitation including preparation, reading, and oral or written translation of texts in class or at home with discussion of grammar, style, and content. Students are evaluated on their class preparation, a midterm, and a final examination. Among the texts used are A. Tietze's Advanced Turkish Reading and a collection of photocopied materials.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 561. Modern Arabic Fiction.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Trevor Legassick (tleg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 403 or reading knowledge of Arabic. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Selected examples of contemporary imaginative prose writing, such as short and long fiction and drama, will be studied. Readings will be in Arabic, and class discussions will be in English.

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AAPTIS 567. Readings in Classical Islamic Texts.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001 Muslim Theology.

Instructor(s): Sherman A Jackson (sajackso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 202 or 403. Taught in English. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the analytical reading of classical Arabic texts from different fields of the Islamic tradition. This academic term the topic will be Muslim theology. This will include a brief historical survey of the development of the theological discourse in medieval Islam along with a thematic treatment of some of the most salient issues debated among theologians. Selections will be drawn from both the traditionalist (Ahl al-hadith and Hanbalites) and rationalist (Mu'tazilite, Ash'arite, Maturidite) traditions. Reading knowledge of Arabic required. Course lectures will be in English. Midterm and brief translation with a critical introduction.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 569. Modern Arabic Poetry.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anton Shammas (antons@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Fluency in Arabic at the advanced level (AAPTIS 502 or equivalent). (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce students of modern Arabic literature to the sheer pleasure of reading and discussing a poem in the original language. Having established the historical and aesthetic background for the emergence and development of modern Arabic poetry, we will closely read and analyze selected poems written throughout the century, representing different schools and trends: neoclassicism, romanticism, symbolism, free-verse, prose-poetry, and modernism. A special emphasis will be put on the influence of T.S. Eliot, and other western poets, on modern Arabic poetry. The list will include authors such as: Ahmad Shawqi, Khalil Mutran, Kahlil Gibran, Said Aql, Al-Sayyab, al-Bayyati, Qabbani, Adonis, Darwish, and other, less known poets.

The selected texts will be assigned for reading and analysis, both at the individual and the group level. At the individual level, each student will be asked to focus on a specific poem of his/her choice, and present it in class. A term paper is due at the end of the term. Intended for Graduate and advanced undergraduates in NES or CMENAS, who are fluent in Arabic, and have completed Arabic 502 or equivalent. Seminar format.

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AAPTIS 587 / HISTORY 531. Studies in Pahlavi and Middle Persian.

Persian-Iranian: Pre-Islamic Iran

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot L Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course has a two-fold aim, the introduction to the Middle Persian language, and the vast literature written in this language by the adherents of two world religions. Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism, the small corpus of Middle Persian inscriptions of the Sasanian dynasty. It has no prerequisites, and is designed for the general student of linguistics, Indian linguistics, history, comparative religion, literature and Near Eastern studies. There will be a special additional component for language study proper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 591. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 Classical Sufi Literature.

Instructor(s): Alexander Knysh (alknysh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 593. Mini Course Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 Calligraphy. Meets beginning in March.

Instructor(s): Khaled Al-Saa'i

Prerequisites: (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 798. Directed Graduate Readings.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AAPTIS 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate Standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AAPTIS 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate Standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: 8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for AAPTIS.


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This page was created at 8:31 PM on Thu, Jan 23, 2003.


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