College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Anthropological Archaeology


This page was created at 8:07 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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ANTHRARC 400(ANTHRCUL 400) / CAAS 405. Field Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (8). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The field Studies course provides students with an opportunity to participate in unique, original, and exciting research in West Africa. Students will be trained in fundamental methods and techniques of archaeological survey, excavation, artifact recording, data analysis, map drafting. They will participate in an ongoing research project of the "Sine Ngayene Archaeological project" (SNAP) in South Central Senegal, entitled "CRAFT SPECIALIZATION, MORTUARY PRACTICES, AND SOCIAL DIFFERENTIATION: ARCHAEOLOGY OF SENEGAMBIAN MEGALITHS.".

Field training is integrated with lectures on archaeological methods and theory, and the Archaeology of West Africa. Data processing sessions introduce students to the analysis of archaeological artifacts, pottery, animal bones, stone tools as well as plant remains. Each student is required to take notes on a daily basis that are read and commented on at the end of each week. The students will later use these notes to write an extensive 30-40 pages report. For those who may be interested a complementary "Archaeology Laboratory Studies" course is offered after the field season. In this sense, students will learn more about the long term curation of archaeological materials in museums contexts.

Course requirements: Daily excavation notes and a 30-40 page research report. Intended audience: Undergraduates with concentration in Anthropology, Archaeology, Afroamerican and African studies. Hours per week and Format: Eight hours/day, Five days/week, Ten weeks. Base: Ngayene Field Station. Field Season: January 15-March 20. Cost: $ 2,000 (including airfares, and transportation in Senegal. On the field, housing and food are funded by the project)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRARC 401(ANTHRCUL 401) / CAAS 406. Archaeology Laboratory Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing; concurrent enrollment in ANTHRARC 400. (6). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course aims to train students in core archaeological processing of excavated remains. It involves restoration, description, drafting, as well as cataloging. Students must be concurrently enrolled in ANTHRARC 400 in order to take this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRARC 482(480). Topics in Anthropological Archaeology.

Section 001 Hunter-Gatherer Adaptations.

Instructor(s): John D Speth (jdspeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Humans have been hunter-gatherers (or foragers) for most of their existence, and much of the world was still peopled with hunter-gatherers at the time of European contact. Though most foraging societies are now gone, there is a vast and fascinating body of ethnohistoric and ethnographic literature documenting the foraging way of life, and this literature provides the foundation for much of our thinking about how humans lived and changed over the vast time-span of the Pleistocene.

This course will examine current trends in the study of hunter-gatherers, focusing on a specific subset of major issues and problems centered on forager diet and subsistence; mobility and settlement patterns; health and reproduction; and patterns of interaction and exchange. Topics will consider both the "living" or ethnographic context, and the use of such information to develop models and testable hypotheses for exploring forager behavior in the past.

The course will be structured as a seminar, although some of the details of format will depend on the number of students that actually enroll, and the mix of undergraduates and graduates. Each week there will be a series of readings on a topic that must be read by all participants in the course. These articles will be available as a course pack at the beginning of the semester (est. cost $40). In addition, in order to pass the course a brief (250 word) synopsis of the main points of each of the assigned readings must be turned in on the day they are to be discussed (the dates will be provided in the course syllabus handed out at the beginning of the term). Most sessions will begin with a brief presentation by the instructor concerning the topic at hand. This will then be followed by student-led presentations and discussions of the week's readings, to be coordinated by a different group of students each week. In addition to the assigned readings and discussions, graduate students must prepare a 25 to 30 page research paper on some particular topic or issue, the specifics of which will be worked out early in the term in consultation with the instructor. Undergraduates will have the option of either taking two in-class exams or writing a research paper (a decision as to which option will be selected must be made early in the term).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRARC 497(ANTHRCUL 497). Museum Research Techniques.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Ford (riford@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Credit is granted for a total of six credits elected through ANTHRARC 496 and 497. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Museum Techniques is the oldest course in the Department of Anthropology. It is designed to teach students about the organization and function of museums in general with specific examples derived from anthropology museums. Topics include the ethics of museum collecting, classification of collections, storage, conservation, collection management, public outreach, and legal constraints. The class will be a lecture-discussion format. Most readings will be electronic library, web, and a text. Students electing 1 credit hour will attend lectures and complete exercises and exams for a grade. Students electing 2 or 3 hours will have a hands-on experience with collections in the museum for 2 or 4 hours respectively.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Get on waitlist on wolverine access and professor will contact you before the first class.

ANTHRARC 582(ANTHRCUL 582). Archaeology II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry T Wright (hwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of world prehistoric cultural development from village life to urban civilization designed as a core course for beginning anthropology graduate students. It introduces theories of the beginnings of agriculture, the development of ranked and stratified societies, and the emergence of states and empires. Exemplary data from Mesopotamia, China, Mesoamerica, and the Central Andes are used to evaluate these theories. The course is a lecture course, with course pack and a few paperbacks, including Bruce Smith's Origin of Agriculture and Susan Pollock's Ancient Mesopotamia. The course grade is based on a paper and an examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRARC 680(ANTHRCUL 680). Old World Regional Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry T Wright (hwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A detailed treatment of specific problems and areas in the Old World.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRARC 683(ANTHRCUL 683). Topics in Archaeology.

Section 001 Andean Prehistory.

Instructor(s): Joyce Marcus (joymar@umich.edu), Kent V Flannery

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a graduate seminar which will cover all of Andean prehistory from the first arrival of humans in the area during the last Ice Age until the arrival of the Spaniards in the 16th century. Seminar will meet Wednesday from 1-4 pm in the Museum Seminar Room.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


Undergraduate Course Listings for ANTHRARC.


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