College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in English


This page was created at 8:10 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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ENGLISH 401 / RELIGION 481. The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse.

Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm, and a final. Class attendance and participation essential.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 406 / LING 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an advanced survey of descriptive English grammar. We will look closely at the formal and semantic motivations for basic grammatical categories and processes in English (words, phrases, clauses, and sentences) and we will discuss how these structures contribute to the expressive potential of the system. There will be daily practice in grammatical parsing, weekly quizzes, and a final exam. The course should be attractive to those professionally interested in English education, practical criticism, or further work in linguistic theory as well as those generally interested in becoming more articulate about the structure of our language. Texts: Randolph Quirk and Sidney Greenbaum, A Student's Grammar of the English Language and John Algeo, Exercises in Contemporary English .

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 Workshop on Translation and Other Things You Can Do With Translation. Meets with English 540.001

Instructor(s): Anne Carson

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an exploration of methods of making and framing a translation, and then turning the translation into something else: a text, object, installation, or performance. The class is open to graduate students as well as undergraduates and requires a reading knowledge of some language other than English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 408 / LING 408. Varieties of English.

Section 001 Early Middle English Texts. Satisfies the Pre-1600 and Pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This term we will examine (often with the aid of parallel translations) works in early Middle English, as well as the better known and more frequently studied major authors Chaucer, Gower, Piers, the Pearl poet. Readings will include selections from prose and poetic histories, mystical writers; contemporary social and political documents (laws, recipes, medical texts, chronicles, charters). We will examine a wide range of early Middle English texts as we develop an appreciation for the roles written English played in medieval England and the cultural and political consequences of the ability to read and write. [Although this course follows up on material covered in ENGLISH 407 (reading Old English), ENGLISH 407 is not a prerequisite.]

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 416 / HISTORY 487 / WOMENSTD 416. Women in Victorian England.

Section 001 Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/english/416/001.nsf

At the very heart of industrialization and the rise of the middle classes in Victorian England were women: anxiously made into guardians of the spiritual sanctity of the home and into devoted keepers of the family hearth, women were integral to the social and political transformations of nineteenth-century England that enabled its remarkable financial growth. The lives and writings of many Victorian women both challenge and attest to the neat enclosure of women in their homes. Through reading non-fiction prose essays, novels, household manuals, and conduct books, we will consider how Victorian women are imagined in these texts, and how these imaginings intersect with women's social history in the nineteenth- and early-twentieth-centuries. We will pay special attention to the educational, urban, and political reform projects in which women were involved over this period. The reading list will include a course pack and writings by Charlotte Bront, Mrs. Beeton, Christina Rossetti, George Eliot, Mrs. Humphry Ward, Alfred Tennyson, John Ruskin, and Octavia Hill.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 427 / THTREMUS 427. Advanced Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): OyamO (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 327. Permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 427.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lorna G Goodison

Prerequisites: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 432. The American Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michele L Simms-Burton (mlsimms@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers a range of novels written by writers born in the United States, whose voices help to comprise a richly textured and complex American literary canon and tradition. We will begin this course by discerning the "birth" of the "American" novel, and how nationalism aids in constructing an American literary tradition. We will interrogate via these texts how these writers define America and what it means to be an American, as well as how conceptions about America and being an American are fluid and at times contradictory when examined and read through the lens of race, class, gender and sexual preference. Likewise, we will investigate elements of these texts that are dialogic and resound loudly from text to text. Ultimately, we will wrestle with developing a working understanding of the uniqueness of American literature within the context of world literature.

Reading List Jazz -Toni Morrison; The Scarlet Letter- Nathaniel Hawthorne; The Awakening- Kate Chopin; The House of Mirth- Edith Wharton; The Sound and the Fury- William Faulkner; Loon Lake- E. L. Doctorow; Devil in a Blue Dress- Walter Mosley; House on Mango Street- Sandra Cisneros; Ceremony- Leslie Marmon Silko; Joy Luck Club- Amy Tan; The Bell Jar- Sylvia Plath; Clifford's Blues- John A. Williams.

This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson (johnaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine developments in English fiction from the turn of the century to the mid-1940s. We will explore the ways in which the twentieth-century novel,rather than being driven primarily by plot, attempts to trace, in Joyce's words, "the curve of an emotion" or to incorporate, as Lawrence desires, philosophy and fiction in the novel. Virginia Woolf tells us that "human nature changed" in the first decade of the 1900s. Certainly the way novelists constructed human nature altered dramatically. We will discuss issues that repeatedly manifest themselves in these novels: how do men and women in the twentieth century respond to or initiate the radical redefinitions of sex roles that characterize the modern period? How do the wars of the first half of the previous century shape and deform the novels written at that time? How does this body of fiction address (and fail to address) the volatile issues associated with race and class in the first half of the twentieth century? We will also pay close attention to the variety of ways each author positions her / himself in relation to a past: how does the modern stand in relation to history? Readings will include a substantial coursepack and the following texts: Gertrude Stein,Three Lives; James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; D. H. Lawrence, Women in Love; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse, Ralph Ellison, The Invisible Man. Course requirements are three essays (two five-page papers and a final, more substantial essay that's seven to nine pages long). There will be a final exam. This course has discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 434. The Contemporary Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ira Konigsberg (ikonigsb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers a broad spectrum of contemporary writers and types of fiction, As well as establishing the specific themes and narrative methods of these literary figures and groups of novels, the course also seeks to discover similar concerns, ideas, and techniques in relation to recent social and cultural developments. The course especially focuses on the possibilities and impossibilities of fiction to deal with social and individual trauma in the real worlds of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The class will read Bernard Malamud's The Assistant, Thomas Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49, Margaret Atwood's Surfacing, Tony Morrison's Sula, V. S. Naipaul's A Bend in the River, D.M. Thomas' The White Hotel, Don Delillo's White Noise, Julian Barnes' A History of the World in 10 1/2 Chapters, and Michael Ondaatje's The English Patient.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 441. Contemporary Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine some of the most significant poems and poetry movements in the period 1945-2002. We shall begin by looking at poems about World War II, and then move on to poems of the so-called Confessional school. Sylvia Plath's book Ariel and Ted Hughes' Birthday Letters will be a special focus, as well as work by the Beat Generation poets. We shall study an assortment of "canonical" as well as multicultural poems from the last two decades. The latter part of the course will feature a volume by Richard Howard, the Hopwood Lecturer for (spring) 2003 and poems about the events of Sept. 11, 2001. One short and one long paper are part of the coursework, as well as a reading journal, a midterm, and a final examination.

This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 450. Medieval Drama.

Section 001 Sex and Religion in Medieval Drama. Satisfies the Pre-1600 and Pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Theresa L Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/english/450/001.nsf

Medieval drama encompasses a wide range of texts, from extremely bawdy secular literature to serious devotional plays. Some texts explore the comedy of human sexual desire, others the grotesque possibilities of the sexualized body. As we read these plays, we will come better to appreciate how literature invents sexuality. Still other texts seek to teach Christian biblical history to the laity, beginning with Creation and ending with the Last Judgment. Although the Christian Bible obviously inspires such literature, the actors speak distinctly unbiblical words, at times uttering blasphemous scatological curses, at other times mocking ecclesiastical rituals. These plays will allow us to explore the connections between serious religious aspiration and carnivalesque laughter. Throughout this course, we will discover that European culture changes significantly between the twelfth century and the sixteenth, leading to fascinating changes in definitions of both sexuality and piety.

NEW TEXT: Winter term students have an exciting additional opportunity for studying medieval drama: Professor Martin Walsh is offering a drama workshop, HUMS 485, meeting Wed. 5-7, or two credits. In this workshop, students will perform some of the plays studied in English 450. The workshop participants will present parts of plays to the English class (and perhaps elsewhere in the community).

Course requirements: active participation in discussions, reading response papers, peer critiques, and two essays.ts for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 465 / MEMS 465. Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales.

Section 001 Medieval Ways of Reading. Satisfies the pre-1600 and pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Theresa L Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/english/465/001.nsf

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales begins in a tavern in Southwark, a seedy area of London, where a few dozen people happen to meet as they prepare for a pilgrimage to Canterbury cathedral. The pilgrims agree to enter into a tale-telling contest on the road to Canterbury, and they in fact relate twenty-three stories as they travel. This tale-telling contest allows Chaucer to experiment with diverse personas, and to exploit the potential of stories to express character. The framing fiction allows him also to represent characters' reactions to stories, to declare their own preferences in literary entertainment, and to take exception to other pilgrims' stories. Not surprisingly, there are some frictions among the pilgrims-and some open conflicts. As they proceed, telling tales and responding to tales, the pilgrims reveal diverse perspectives on the value of literature and its role in society. Some pilgrims prefer bawdy fiction; others like elevated philosophical romances. Some see fiction as a tool for making money; others view stories as a way to save souls. They tell tales in a number of genres, including romance, fabliau, saint's life, sermon, moral allegory, and tragedy. In effect, the Canterbury pilgrims become a community of readers engaged in a discussion about literature, and they reveal to us some of the values associated with literature in fourteenth-century England. Canterbury Tales, then, allows us better to understand how one medieval poet imagined literature and its role in the world, and how he imagined an audience responding to his texts. Course requirements: active participation in discussions and oral readings, passage translations, reading response papers, peer critiques, and two essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 469. Milton.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael C Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course, will be devoted to reading closely the poetry and prose of John Milton, England's greatest epic poet, amid the various intellectual and social current of the seventeenth century. Milton is a writer with whom almost every subsequent generation of English writers has had to deal, for better and worse, and his reputation has fallen and risen as political, social, and aesthetic ideals have changed. Milton's impassioned efforts to address the ills of his day entailed contradictions that are still very much with us: he was apolitical who was willing to endorse authoritarian methods to accomplish liberal goals; he was a devout believer in meritocracy who rarely felt this belief threaten an inherited if incorrigible misogyny; he was the epic narrator of the War in Heaven who felt that military valor had nothing to do with true virtue. Milton also wrote some of the most sublime poetry available in English about the joys of the natural world, about the deeply embodied pleasures of eating and sex, and about human relationships. We will be particularly interested in how Milton's political career reverberates throughout the poetry the ways, for example, that his experience as a defender of regicide may have influenced his portrait of Satan's rebellion against a resolutely monarchical God. We will also look at how political defeat produced a radically inward reorientation of Milton's ardent political and spiritual aspirations. We will spend the lion's share of our time in an intensive reading of Paradise Lost, but will also read some of the early poetry and prose as well as Samson Agonistes and Paradise Regained. Requirements include attendance and participation, 2 five-page essays, a midterm, and a final exam.

This course satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 470. Early American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 American Literature to 1830. Satisfies the American Literature and the pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer you a broad introduction to the literature and intellectual history of North America from the first Spanish contacts through the period of the Early Republic. We will read, for example, the descriptions of New World nature and peoples by marvelling Spanish and English explorers and conquerors, the impassioned theological expressions of New England, narratives of captivity, conversion, and enslavement that emerged from the often violent crossing of cultures and races throughout the American colonies and around the Atlantic rim, a seduction novel, and the foundational documents surrounding the Revolution. My interest lies not in defining an American character, form or story, but in asking why certain forms emerged or were invoked and altered in response to unique historical situations. There will be three short papers and an oral presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 471. Nineteenth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 Thought, Deed, and the Written Word: American Selves.

Instructor(s): Maria V Sanchez (maricarl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do we know what an individual is, or who counts as one? This class will study the development of individualism in the United States through readings of a wide variety of 19th century texts (with a possible quick nod to the 20th century toward the end of the term). We'll begin by looking at different strains of individualism, roughly divided into those that privilege thought (interiority, self-identity, self-knowledge), and those that privilege deed (social status, occupation or profession, action); all the while, we'll consider the role of writing, and the vital importance of the written word, to how Americans come to understand individualism. How do slaves, for example, achieve individuality, when they are defined as 3/5 of a one person for purposes of congressional apportionment? How do the century's changing ideas concerning gender roles, "Americanness," immigration and imperialism, theoretical class fluidity, and so on, affect how we define an individual? Our authors may include: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Zitkala-Sa, Henry David Thoreau, Harriet Wilson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, and Elizabeth Stoddard.

This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 472. Twentieth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 Multilingual U.S. Narratives: Asian American, Latino/a, Jewish, and African American Vernacular Cultures. Satisfies the American Literature and New Tradtions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Joshua L Miller (joshualm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will take a comparative approach to the study of multi-ethnic American cultures. As we trace African American, Asian American, Jewish, and Latino/a literature from the 1920s through the present day, we will discuss the stylistics and politics of multilingual American literatures. While the canon of U.S. literature has grown considerably more multicultural in recent years, it has not grown noticeably multilingual. We'll discuss the resistance to non-English and non-"standard" English cultures in the U.S. as well as the rich legacy of vernacular narratives that have argued for a more inclusive conceptualization of American languages and identity.

There are no language prerequisites for this course. The readings will include novels by Zora Neale Hurston, Carlos Bulosan, Henry Roth, Américo Paredes, John Okada, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Jessica Hagedorn, as well as films by Ang Lee and John Sayles.

Requirements for this course include short essays (2-3p.) and one final essay (10-12p.), in addition to informed participation and occasional quizzes. Film screenings will be scheduled outside of class time. For attendance and waitlist policies, see course website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 The Environmental Imagination in American Literature.

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will look at how the various environments of North America have been imagined from the time of Spanish contact up through the end of the twentieth century. A section will be devoted to each of the following places/concepts: the tropics, the wilderness, the desert, the river, the swamp and the farm. In each section, we will pursue the treatment of place from different historic moments and social perspectives. For the tropics, for example, we will read Columbus, Sir Walter Raleigh, and Andrew Marvell on European anticipations of an earthly paradise as well as the contemporary Caribbean poet, Derek Walcott, on landscape-centered meditations of colonial history and pastoral dreaming. For the swamp, we will read an eighteenth-century Virginia wit's rendition of this landscape as a place in which Enlightenment ideas of improvement and sociability are overwhelmed, nineteenth-century narrative and painterly associations of swamps with escaped slaves, and Jim Jarmusch's recent film comedy about escaped convicts and innocents, Down By Law. There will be one short and one long paper as well as an in-class presentation and an ongoing creative meditation on an environment of your choice.

This course satisfies the American Literature requirement and the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 478 / CAAS 476. Contemporary Afro-American Literature.

Section 001 Black Narrative and the Politics of Mobility. Satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Sandra R Gunning (sgunning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

African American writers and intellectuals have always contemplated the impact of (in)voluntary travel on ideas of self and community by using literature to address the following: slaves and slave traders traversing the dreaded Middle Passage; black soldiers serving in wars of territorial and political expansion; black missionaries, merchants and colonists in Africa, the Middle East, and southeast Asia; black "tourists" in Europe, the Caribbean and Canada; black migrants within the US traveling from South to North or westward into "new" territories. Looking broadly at travel narratives, poetry, novels, and autobiography, this course will address the following questions: 1) How do we analyze the different sub-categories of travel writing black writers have appropriated, reformulated or invented? 2) What roles do gender, class and ethnicity play in shaping the way African American authors represent the challenges and possibilities of black mobility? 3) Given the continually evolving question of what constitutes an "American," how have encounters with peoples of other regions/nationalities (especially other peoples of the African Diaspora) influenced the artistic and national vision of African Americans writing on this side of the "black Atlantic?"

Course load: students have to do a take-home midterm, an in-class end-of term of exam, a paper, and a short presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 Salman Rushdie: A Literary and Cultural Examination.

Instructor(s): Sadia Abbas (abbass@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with most of Salman Rushdie's major novels. It is also to examine the politics of the controversy surrounding the death sentence. In our reading of the novels we will be concerned with formal issues as well as thematic ones. In our discussion of the cultural politics of the death sentence, we will examine the way in which Rushdie has become a symbol of the Muslim World's encounter with the West, and the ways in which diaspora and minority politics have played themselves out in this collision. Texts include Rushdie's major novels from Midnight's Children to the The Moor's Last Sigh, Imaginary Homelands and selections from Rushdie's latest collection of essays. Possible readings from William Blake, Angela Carter, and Hanif Kureishi. This will be a difficult and rigorous course, with a large amount of reading. Two essays, one long and one short. Several short writing assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 Jane Austen in Context.

Instructor(s): Adela N Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will do a careful reading of Austen's six major novels along with (a) some of the novels by women of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century that she herself read; (b) other kinds of writings about women from Austen's era, such as feminist and anti-feminist tracts, conduct books, and letters; (c) selected essays in social and cultural history. We will also view and discuss one or two of the recent film versions of her novels, in order to explore what Jane Austen means in our context as well as her own. Texts will be Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma and Persuasion; Burney, Evelina, Wollstonecraft, Maria and/or A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Radcliffe, The Romance of the Forest; plus a course pack. The class will combine lively lectures and livelier discussion; students will write one paper, an annotated bibliography, and a take-home final. NOTE: the reading for this course will be heavy; students might want to read Frances Burney's Evelina (Oxford UP) over winter break.

This course satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 003 Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years. Meets with Russian 479.001.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 479.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 483. Great Works of Literature.

Section 001 Primo Levi and the Memory of Auschwitz. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Primo Levi was a Jew from Torino who survived a year in Auschwitz. His books, which deal recurrently with this experience, arguably constitute one of the major moral and stylistic projects of this century. In this course we will discuss five of them: Survival at Auschwitz, The Reawakening, The Monkey's Wrench, The Periodic Table, and The Drowned and The Saved. We will also read selections from his poems. We will examine in particular his understanding of the role of memory and remembering in constituting social experience, and observe the ways in which he confronts the problem of writing about the unspeakable. Coursework includes one 8 page essay and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 483. Great Works of Literature.

Section 002 The Plays of the Residency of the Royal Shakespeare Company. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This one-credit hour course will present an analysis of the plays which the Royal Shakespeare Company will perform this Winter Term (2003) during their residency at the University of Michigan. The course will meet on Monday evenings throughout the term, and consider, in order, the stage adaptation of Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children, and two plays of Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor and Coriolanus." The course will involve some guest lecturers, including some members of the Royal Shakespeare Company. It is strongly urged that all take advantage of the opportunity to view the three plays. To that end, those enrolled in the course will be eligible to purchase tickets at reduced cost.

The course is set for Monday evening in order to allow not only students at the University, but people from Ann Arbor and the wider community to attend. Such visitors are welcome, with no registration required. If they identify themselves in advance through an email (fiesole@umich.edu), I will try to see that there are sufficient copies of texts available for reading.

For students enrolled, there will be one essay assigned, and a final examination of one hour.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 Rhetoric & the Achievement of Women's Rights. Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Alisse S Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL484w03/

Most nineteenth-century American women had little or no access to political leaders, higher education, or even the wages they earned; they were not allowed to vote, sign contracts, or own property in the United States. Despite these rigid constraints and tremendous opposition, over a span of eight decades American women generated massive social and political changes. How? By using the only tool available to them: language. Clearly, what we say, how we say it, and to whom it is said can and does change the world. In this class, you'll learn to use rhetorical theory as a way to critically examine persuasive appeals while we study texts from the nineteenth-century woman's rights movement. Together, we will consider the power of language to define, reform, and even revolutionize politics and society. Work for the course includes class participation, quizzes, and two exams. For waitlist and attendance policies, visit the course website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 496. Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 503. Middle English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This term we will examine works in early Middle English, as well as the better known and more frequently studied major authors Chaucer, Gower, Piers, the Pearl poet. Readings will include selections from prose and poetic histories, mystical writers, and contemporary social and political documents (laws, recipes, medical texts, chronicales, charters). We will examine a wide range of early Middle English texts as we develop an appreciation for the roles written English played in medieval England and the cultural and political consequences of the ability to read and write.

The course requirements include regular in-class participation, frequent quizzes, two hour exams, and a short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 506. Structure of English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an advanced survey of descriptive English grammar. We will look closely at the formal and semantic motivations of basic grammatical categories and processes in English (words, phrases, clauses, and sentences) and we will discuss how these structures contribute to the expressive value of the system. There will be daily practice in grammatical parsing, weekly quizzes, and a final exam. The course should be attractive to those professionally interested in English education, practical criticism, or further work in linguistic theory as well as those generally interested in becoming more articulate about the structure of our language. Text: Randolph Quirk and Sidney Greenbaum, A Student's Grammar of the English Language and John Algeo, Exercises in Contemporary English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 526. Literature and Culture.

Section 001 The New Public Scholarship in the Arts, Humanities, and Design. Meets with American Culture 699.004, Rackham 570.001, Art 600.002, and Edu.

Instructor(s): Julie Ellison (jeson@umich.edu), Kristin Ann Hass , John C Burkhardt , David Scobey (scobey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/english/526/001.nsf

See American Culture 699.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 538. Modern Novel.

Section 001 Modern Novel.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine developments in English fiction from the turn of the century to the mid-1940s. We will explore the ways in which the twentieth-century novel attempts to trace, in Joyce's words, "the curve of an emotion" or to incorporate, as Lawrence desires, philosophy and fiction in the novel. Virginia Woolf tells us that "human nature changed" in the first decade of the 1900s. Certainly the way novelists constructed human nature altered dramatically. We will discuss issues that repeatedly manifest themselves in these novels: how do men and women in the twentieth century respond to or initiate the radical redefinitions of sex roles that characterize the modern period? How do the wars of the first half of the previous century shape and deform the novels written at that time? How does this body of fiction address (and fail to address) the volatile issues associated with race and class in the first half of the twentieth century? We will also pay close attention to the variety of ways each author positions her / himself in relation to a past: how does the modern stand in relation to history? We will also read selected essays in a course pack essays that will help to frame critical and theoretical issues relevant to modernism and modern fiction.

I am eager to make sure that this course meets the needs of its students, and, later this fall, I will be soliciting those who are enrolled for reading suggestions. I am planning, however, to read James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Ulysses; and Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse. Other selections are negotiable.

Students will write a substantial final paper for this course, and they will prepare an in-class report, as well as presenting a prospectus of their final essay earlier in the semester.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 540. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 Workshop on Translation and Other Things You Can Do With Translation. [credits?] Meets with English 407.001.

Instructor(s): Anne Carson

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an exploration of methods of making and framing a translation, and then turning the translation into something else: a text, object, installation, or performance. The class is open to graduate students as well as undergraduates and requires a reading knowledge of some language other than English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ENGLISH 547. Literature of the Victorian Period.

Section 001 Victorian Poetry.

Instructor(s): Johanna H Prins

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is an introduction to the pleasures and challenges of reading Victorian poetry. It is designed for graduate students with an interest in nineteenth-century literature and/or poetics and/or creative writing. We will read a wide range of Victorian poets, alongside critical essays included in The Cambridge Companion to Victorian Poetry (ed. Joseph Bristow). Throughout the semester we will attend in particular to Victorian experiments with different verse forms, within the context of nineteenth-century debates about meter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 572. Workshop in Writing Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter Ho Davies

Prerequisites: MFA students only. ENGLISH 571. Permission of instructor required. (6). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

ENGLISH 572 is an advanced level workshop course in the writing (and reading) of fiction. Individual classes will consist of discussion of original student work, and occasional assigned reading. We will consider the aims of individual writers along with the effects of stories on readers and examine/practice the various mechanisms by which these are achieved (plot, character, dialogue, point of view, etc.).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 575. Workshop in Writing Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard W Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; ENGLISH 574. Permission of instructor required. (6). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers a chance for graduate students both in the PhD and MFA programs to learn virtually all there is to know in one semester about rhyme, meter, stanza forms, etc., in an atmosphere catering both to the practicing poet and the non-specialist. This is, in W.B. Yeats' words, a "singing school." We will approach the subject the way poets,professional and amateur, have always approached prosody by "studying / Monuments of its own magnificence," as Yeats put it, and then trying to set up our own lean-tos.

The course has two aspects: one, historical and explanatory; the other, practical. The professor will offer a historical survey of versification in English, beginning with the Old English alliterative line, glancing in a very amateur manner at the Classical meters, moving all the way to free verse and beyond, to the return to rhyme and meter among poets of the 80s, 90s & 00s. On the practical side, each student will be asked, each week, to write in the verse form that is being studied. Paul Fussell's Poetic Meter and Poetic Form and The Shorter Norton Anthology of Poetry will be primary textbooks. There is also a coursepack incorporating selections from John Frederick Nims, Robert Graves, Robert Bridges, George Saintsbury, the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, John Thompson's Founding of English Meter, Vladimir Nabokov's Notes on Prosody, Charles O. Hartmann's unsatisfactory book on free verse, Harvey Gross' Sound and Form in Modern Poetry, and obscure snippets from here and there.

Class limited to fifteen. Expect to work hard, learn a lot, and have a lot of fun.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 577. Independent Study-Creative Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In lieu of the workshop, fourth-semester MFA students receive six hours of independent study credit to enable them to concentrate on completion of the thesis project. Theses consist of a substantial body of poems, short stories, or portions of a novel.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 579. Creative Writing-Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lorna G Goodison

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 590. Independent Study for M.A. Students.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, English and Education, or Women's Studies, and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 627. Critical Theories and Cross-Cultural Literature.

Section 001 APA Literary Criticism. Meets with AMCULT 699.007.

Instructor(s): Maria S See

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This survey of Asian Pacific American literary scholarship traces the changing concerns and debates of the field, especially in the last thirty years. We will read a decent chunk of the recent "boom" in APA literary scholarship. But the first few meetings at the beginning of the term will be devoted to discussing literary/cultural models available (and unavailable) to APA authors and critics previous to the institutionalization of APA studies. We will pause a few times during the term to focus on defining moments, such as the debates on gender and authenticity generated by the publication of The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood among Ghosts and the ongoing fallout from the Lois Yamanaka awards controversy. Course requirements: active, informed participation, a class presentation, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 627. Critical Theories and Cross-Cultural Literature.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): White

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 642. Topics in the Renaissance.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven G Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"The English do not travel much," observed Thomas Platter, a Swiss visitor to London, in 1599; instead, they go to the public playhouses of the city, "learning from the plays what is happening in other lands." This course will explore the ways in which the stage did allow Elizabethan audiences to play with difference, to try out or experiment with versions of self and other along ethnic, religious, gender, national, and other axes of relation. This was the first age of what we now call globalization; it was also a period in which the Absolute became relative, as Christian Europe fragmented into various forms of Protestantism and Catholicism; it was the period in which countries like England began to expand, whether through actual colonization or through mercantile or political encounters with ethnically and religiously diverse cultures, ranging from the Americas to Istanbul. Students will be chart their own course through these imaginary topographies, with all the help I can offer; diverse approaches are welcome, whether historical, anthropological, post-colonial, theatrical, formal/aesthetic, or others that you want to share with the class. Plays read will include more familiar works (Merchant of Venice, Othello, The Tempest) and less familiar ones drawn from highly popular sub-genres, such as pirate and Turk plays. There will be weekly reports and responses to the shared readings, a bibliographic research project that will be summarized in an oral report to the class, and a short term paper due at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 644. Topics in the Restoration and Eighteenth Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lincoln B Faller

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Over the "long" eighteenth century the print culture of England gave far more attention to crime and criminality than that of any other country in Europe. Accounts of murders, robberies, thefts, and rapes, and the ensuing trials and gallows speeches, became an increasingly prominent feature of the popular press, along with ever longer and more elaborate criminal biographies and collections of biographies and trial accounts. This course will explore the relationship between the "literature" of crime and more canonical literature. It will involve reading a substantial sampling of eighteenth-century writing about crimes and criminals, and close attention to a selection of novels by Defoe and Richardson, possibly some other authors, along with plays by Gay and Lillo. Much significant scholarly work has been done over the past several decades on the history and literature of crime in the period, and we shall of course be reviewing the best of it, but also with a view to opening new ground. We will observe much about the "strangeness" of eighteenth-century English culture, even as we recognize certain elements in it that continue, mutatis mutandis, to this day. The course will require weekly response papers, frequent presentations, a short paper at midterm, and a longer paper at the end of the semester. Students will be expected to help shape the course out of their own passionate interests, and of course to participate vigorously in discussions with their colleagues. The instructor himself hopes to learn much that will be new to him.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5

ENGLISH 667. Studies in 20th Century Authors.

Section 001 The Jewish Encounter with America.

Instructor(s): Julian Arnold Levinson

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar, we will examine a series of texts that grapple with the complex encounter between Jews and American Culture. Beginning with Emma Lazarus' work in the 1870s, we will proceed chronologically up to the "Jewish revival" of the present day. Our texts will come from a variety of genres, including poetry (Lazarus, Charles Reznikoff, Allen Ginsberg, and Marge Piercy), fiction (Henry Roth, Ludwig Lewisohn, Tillie Olsen, I.B. Singer, and Rebecca Goldstein), autobiography (Mary Antin and Alfred Kazin), drama (Clifford Odets), and cultural criticism (Irving Howe and Cynthia Ozick). Among the themes to be considered will be secularization, assimilation, the rhetoric of Americanism, collective memory and/or nostalgia, the construction of an ethnic identity, the discourse of race and whiteness, the encounter between Jews and Blacks, and the literary mediation of religious traditions. Participants in the seminar will be encouraged to make use of a variety of methodologies, including those associated with American Studies, Cultural Studies, and Jewish Studies. Requirements: a presentation and an essay (15-20 pages).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 675. Creative Writing Project.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; ENGLISH 571 or 574. Permission of instructor required. (6). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 675. Creative Writing Project.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack

Prerequisites: MFA students only; ENGLISH 571 or 574. Permission of instructor required. (6). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 799. Departmental Colloquium.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 822. Seminar: Critical Theory.

Section 001 Body Theory.

Instructor(s): Tobin Anthony Siebers (tobin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"We are not well advised," Stanley Cavell muses, "to inspect the population to discover who among us in fact have bodies and who have not." We all have bodies this is an indisputable fact, but not all facts are equal, and neither are our bodies. The last thirty years have seen an explosion of theoretical speculation about the body, some of it bent on showing the primacy of the body, some of it contending that the body is anything but fact. We have seen the emergence of the gendered body, the queer body, the racial body, the docile body, the body politic, the body in pain, the disabled body, the ritual body, etc. "Every body wants to get into the act," said the man with the humongous nose. This seminar will examine contemporary body theory, ranging from its origins in the human geography of psychoanalysis and the materialism of Marx to its postmodern incorporations. Some areas of special focus will be the use of human and animal bodies in art, hunger artistry, blood and the media, prosthetics, intersex identity, narcissism, ritual and exhibitionism, social constructionism, piercing, and disability studies. Headliner theorists include Georges Bataille, Judith Butler, Mary Douglas, Michel Foucault, Sander Gilman, René Girard, Donna Haraway, bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Nancy Mairs, and others. Our main question throughout will be: what does body theory incorporate, and what does it not?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 842. Seminar: An Historical Period.

Section 001 English Legends: Gender, Religious, and National Identity.

Instructor(s): Catherine Sanok

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course investigates the construction of gender, religious, and national identity as it is negotiated in medieval and early modern England. It does so by focusing on sacred biography, the Lives of holy men and women, a genre that had enormous influence on pre-modern definitions of communal and individual identity. We will trace how the tradition responds to the enormous cultural and political changes of the late Middle Ages, especially the rising visibility of women's literary culture, the threat of religious heterodoxy, a new emphasis on national identity and nationalist myth, and renewed interest in the Crusades. Two primary points of focus will be the construction of saints' Lives as women's literature and the use of saints' Lives to define political community (in regional, national, and international terms). After exploring these concerns in the late medieval tradition, we will turn to early modern revisions of sacred biography, tracing how both Protestant and Catholic writers used the genre to redefine English devotional and national identity, as well as how representations of the medieval tradition helped to gender religious difference and national identity. Our attention to the early modern "afterlife" of a medieval tradition will allow us to reconsider the boundaries of literary periodization as well. Written work will include a short book review and two conference-style papers to be presented orally (20 minutes), one of which will be revised and extended as a final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 842. Seminar: An Historical Period.

Section 002 Victorian Sexuality.

Instructor(s): Martha J Vicinus (vicinus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 852. Seminar: American Literature.

Section 001 Antebellum African American Texts.

Instructor(s): Xiomara A Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will investigate the antebellum U.S. bourgeoning of African American textual production between 1825 and 1860, reading the work of freeborn blacks and former slaves to engage with the heterogeneity of these "early" writings while exploring the consolidation of an abolitionist aesthetic across a range of genres poetry, fiction and autobiography associated with the 1850s. Our goal will be to track the emerging dominance of abolition and uplift in African American literary endeavors against a broader discursive context that illuminates how other texts often responded to, but also contested, this dominance. A sampling of texts includes William Wells Brown's Clotel (1853), Frank Webb's The Garies and their Friends (1855), the Memoirs of Rhode Island native, Elleanor Eldredge (1838), and Joseph Wilson's Sketches of the Higher Classes of Philadelphia (1841). In conjunction with our close study of these texts, we will engage with relevant theory and criticism, working to interrogate the assumptions about race, history and literature at the center of critical, methodological, and theoretical rubrics for 19th century African American literature.

Requirements for the course: intensive readings and participation, weekly response papers, one class presentation, and a research/critical paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 992. Directed Study for Doctoral Students/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Must have a Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Winter Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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