College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Film and Video Studies


This page was created at 8:11 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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FILMVID 400. Filmmaking II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert W Rayher (rray@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 300 or equivalent experience in filmmaking and permission of instructor. (3). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an advanced 16mm motion picture production course. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with dramatic film production from interpreting the screenplay through shooting, editing, and post-production. The relationship of these activities to aesthetic development being the fundament of the course, and the basis of its connection to film studies. You will have access to a state-of-the-art Panaflex 16mm camera in addition to standard production equipment. Students work in small groups to produce a substantial sync-sound final project, as well as participating in a large in-class dramatic production (collaboration with Theater and Drama students). Evaluation: participation in in-class projects, production assignments, final project. Text: Pincus and Ascher, Filmmaker's Handbook.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 401. Video Art II.

Section 001 Documentary Practice. Students must elect FILMVID 320.002/003 concurrently.

Instructor(s): Stashu Kybartas (skybar@umich.edu), Mark Nornes (amnornes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 301 or equivalent experience with video production and permission of instructor. (3). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/filmvid/401/001.nsf

This is a co-requisite course with FILMVID 320 Documentary, which covers the theory and history aspects of nonfiction film and video. Students must take both courses, which allow them to thoroughly integrate documentary study and production. FILMVID 401 is geared toward experienced film/video concentrators who would like to explore and develop their own interests in documentary practice in dialog with inquiries into the ways in which artists and theorists have historically approached this mode of filmmaking. Students will refine video production skills learned in Video Art 1, and are expected to complete individual projects as well as participate in group exercises. Students will produce their own work and, if needed, crew for other class members. A top priority of the course is screening works-in-progress for critique. The linkage with FILMVID 320 will provide students a unique opportunity to bring practice into theory.

Enrollment is limited to 18

*Please note, students also must enroll(waitlist) in FILMVID 320.002 & 320.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2, 5, Permission of Department.

FILMVID 404. Interdisciplinary Collaborations in Visual Media.

Section 001 Dance Video. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Terri L Sarris (tsarris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: A 300- (or 400-) level production course in the relevant emphasized area: FILMVID 300, 301, 302, or 405; and permission of instructor. (1-3). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From the films of Maya Deren to contemporary music video, this interdisciplinary course will explore the unique challenges of capturing dance on film and video and of creating a hybrid art form known as "videodance" or screen dance.

Working with students from the Department of Dance (Dance 462 Taught by Peter Sparling, Department of Dance), students will produce and direct a series of short videodance projects. This is a 3-credit course that counts as a production elective in the Film/Video concentration

Some prior experience with digital video production and editing is preferred.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 405. Computer Animation I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher E McNamara (mcnamart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 200, and permission of instructor. (3). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This digital media production course is a hands on investigation of the Macintosh computing environment and more specifically the moving image software used to create short, animated works, multi-media projects, video and motion graphics. Using graphics tools like Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Macromedia Flash, Director and DV editing software, students will work individually and in small groups to make short, digital-cinema works. Emphasis is placed upon the fundamentals of the preception of motion over time, rotoscoping, digital photography, storyboarding and final output options of finished animations. Students should have a basic working knowledge of the Macintosh platform, Photoshop and digital video.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 406. Computer Animation II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher E McNamara (mcnamart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 405 or equivalent experience with video production, and permission of instructor. (3). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This advanced class explores the theories and applications of interactive animation design. Individual student projects are developed using Macromedia Director and Adobe Photoshop and Macromedia SoundEdit 16. Graphics, sound, and interactivity are utilized to create highly conceptual non-linear environments. Through critical analysis of both student assignments, and professional works, we will investigate the successes and failures of various types of interactivity to communicate with an audience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 410. Screenwriting II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James S Burnstein

Prerequisites: FILMVID 310. Permission of instructor required. (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will learn to cast a critical eye on their own first drafts by analyzing other class members' screenplays. Working in teams, students will break down screenplays in terms of structure, story logic, character development, character relationships, dialogue, visuals, and theme. Using feedback from their fellow students and instructor, students will strive to fix the problems in their own individual screenplays. A major rewrite and polish will be required.

Please note: A maximum of twenty students will be admitted to this course. Students will be selected based on the quality of their original screenplays and/or their Screenwriting I instructor's recommendation. Other factors being equal, preference will be given to senior concentrators in Film and Video Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 414. Film Theory and Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Johannes Eugen Von Moltke (moltke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/filmvid/414/001.nsf

This is primarily a reading course designed to provide the student with an overview of how people through the twentieth century have thought about film. Theories of cinema offer a philosophical approach to understanding film as an art form. Starting with Hugo Munsterberg and Vachel Lindsay in the 1910s, students will read a wide range of theoretical approaches as they proceed through this 100 year history.

We will compare and contrast the viewpoints of influential thinkers on film such as Eisenstein and Bazin, as well as analyze recent commentary that takes up questions regarding film as a representation of culture, as a medium for narrating stories, as a source of psychological fascination, and as a technologically unique process. This course is required for concentrators in the program, but is open to all students with some background in film. Requirements include several papers and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 414. Film Theory and Criticism.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Lucia A Saks (lsaks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are acquainted with the canonical texts of film theory, dating from the silent period up to the latest developments in multicultural and postmodern theory. The goal is both a familiarity with key concepts and terminology, and the improvement of student's analytic abilities as they approach film from the point of view of philosophy and social theory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 441. National Cinemas.

Section 001 Mexican & Brazilian Cinema.

Instructor(s): Catherine Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 360. (3). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/filmvid/441/001.nsf

Since the early 1990s, Mexican and Brazilian cinemas have experienced a resurgence to become the most vibrant national cinemas in Latin America in the early 21st century. New and older generations of filmmakers are experimenting with narrative and formal strategies as well as creative ways of producing and distributing their work within a new global framework that is still dominated by the major film studios based in Los Angeles. This course will take a comparative approach to the historical trajectories of these important national cinemas, focusing on six key trends that have shaped their global positioning and ability to deliver meaningful entertainment to the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking filmgoing population throughout the twentieth century:

  1. early attempts at artisanal production in provincial and metropolitan centers;
  2. the forging of national film genres in industries modeled after Hollywood during the forties and fifties;
  3. a politically engaged art cinema enjoying international distribution and critical acclaim in the 60s and early 70s;
  4. the popular, yet critically derided wave of "B" films that began in the industrial era and continued into the 80s;
  5. recent "post-industrial" commercial art cinema in the post-NAFTA, post-Collor era; and
  6. indigenous video production, both of which have been successfully distributed in Europe, Canada, and the United States.

Throughout our consideration of works by major men and women directors Emilio Fernández, Luis Buñuel, Jaime Humberto Hermosillo, María Landeta, Mari Carmen de Lara, Arturo Ripstein, Alejandro González Iñárritu (Mexico), Nelson Pereira dos Santos, Luis de Barros, Carlos Reichenbach, Sergio Bianchi, Ana Carolina, Tizuka Yamasaki, Glauber Rocha, Tata Amaral (Brazil), we will study the influence in these cinemas of the enduring "love-hate" relationship with Hollywood, the dialogue with neorealist and surrealist currents in Europe, the central importance of documentary discourse and technique, and the premium placed on popular culture in the quest for film as the quintessential form of modern national expresson.

This course will be taught in English. Film diaries, a quiz, and a final research paper. Books will be available for purchase at Shaman Drum.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 441. National Cinemas.

Section 003 Italian Cinema. Meets with ITALIAN 315.001.

Instructor(s): Giorgio Bertellini (giorgiob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 360. (3). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore key "moments" in Italian cinema, with the goal of understanding neorealist film practice as an alternative to CHC "realism"; the importance of Italian cinema to realist film theory; the importance of Italian cinema as a model for a cinema of political engagement and social criticism; the cultural and intellectual context out of which Italian cinema was produced (and viewed). The course will focus primarily on neorealist films and "the art film" of the post-1960 period, but we will also look at popular forms such as the commedia all Italiana, the spaghetti Western, the Supercolossi, and the horror genre. Films will include Bicycle Thieves, Ossessione, La Terra Trema, Voyage to Italy, The Easy Life, L'Eclisse, Teorema, Padre Padrone, and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 442 / CAAS 442. Third World Cinema.

Section 001 Third World Cinema.

Instructor(s): Frances K Gateward (gateward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be a mix of documentary, shorts, and feature films from a variety of countries - including Singapore, Thailand, Angola, Senegal, Guatemala, Argentina, Cuba, Martinique, etc. There will be three papers for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 451 / AMCULT 490. American Film Genres.

Section 001 The Western and Science Fiction Film, and Beyond.

Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (4). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/amcult/490/001.nsf

See American Culture 490.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 460. Technology and the Moving Image.

Section 001 Video Games: Culture/Form.

Instructor(s): Sheila C Murphy (scmurphy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/filmvid/460/001.nsf

This course traces the history, aesthetics, and culture of video games from early text adventures to contemporary first-person shooter games. We will consider video game genres, narratives, gender and identity, and the influence of video games on mainstream media culture and Internet culture. We will also discuss the technological development of games and game systems and the video game industry in general, as well as how video games have had an impact upon the history of computers. From "Zork" to "Myst" to "Grand Theft Auto", we will seriously consider video games as an important cultural form of representation and interactivity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 485. The Global Screen.

Section 001 Interactions & Frictions in World Cinema/Media.

Instructor(s): Lucia A Saks (lsaks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 230 or 236 and one of: FILMVID 360, 441, 440, 442, CAAS 400, 442. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an exploration of the ways in which cinema and television from around the world intersect with the ongoing processes of globalization and transnationalism. We will explore these intersections from a variety of perspectives or sites including production, consumption, regulation, representation, and identity in order to map the contemporary transnational or global mediascape that confronts us today. In the past, the global cultural economy has been associated with the flow of western cultural products around the world, and the reception of those products has been investigated in terms of domination, resistance, and appropriation. But things are more complicated (confusing) today. Production, distribution, and reception take place in many sites around the world following the flow of capital, people, and information. Media transnationals address previously ignored or marginalized diasporic communities as new markets for specialized products. The diffusion of people across (trans)national boundaries both reinforces and forces revision of questions of national identity and cultural affilitation. This occurs not only at the level of spectatorship, but also at the level of production, There is a new type of filmmaker one that can no longer be subsumed within the category of national cinema, but, who like the texts themselves, is a product of migrancy and diasporic movement. In the broadest sense then, our task will be to explore how the transnational production and transmission of films and tv programs reveal the marks of these conditions thematically, aesthetically, and in their marketing strategies. Drawing on readings in film, media, and cultural theory, we will examine a number of texts across genres and types (documentaries, short films, feature films, tv sitcoms) against their instutitional context in order to understand the frictions and interactions that constitute the global screen. In keeping with the theme of the transnational, no one particular geopolitical area will be emphasized.

Instead, the following questions will guide our global journey: How do these audio/visual products address the issues of migrancy, exile, return, and homeland? How does the persistence of history maintain, alter/change in the face of a global imagination? How do differences in nationality, ethnicity, age, gender, class, and occupation shape one's experiences of globalization, migration, and transnationalism? What are the connections between globalization, transnationalism, and neocolonialism? How do developing countries accommodate the global and transnational pressures in their attempts at nation building? How do diasporic groups or communities negotiate the issues of cultural identity in this transnational landscape? What is the figure of the transnational filmmaker, and how do they position themselves and their work vis a vis the national and the transnational? How have the concepts of family/home/roots adapted to the influences of globalization, migration, and transnationalism? What are some ways of critiquing globalization and transnationalism?

The media products, their producers, and the institutions to be studied originate from a range of geopolitical regions including India, Africa, the multi-ethnic USA, Japan, China, Western Europe, and Latin America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 500. Directed Study in Film and Video.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (1-4). Laboratory fee may be required. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced course permitting intensive study of film and/or video subject under supervision of a Film/Video faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 601. Seminar in Film Historiography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kristen M Whissel (kwhissel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 350 and 360, and Graduate standing. (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course proposes to examine the process and progress of film historical research and writing. Students will read with a critical eye historical arguments in various areas of film history: aesthetic, technological, business, and social history. This seminar will use one or more specific productive "problems" that (such as the advent of the star system, the coming of sound, the rise of independent production, the development of exhibition practice) as the focus or case study for considering diverse methods relied upon by historians in conceptualizing processes of determination and historical causality in relation to film production and reception. Students will do extensive research with primary materials.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 603. Seminar in Film and Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Abel (richabel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/filmvid/603/001.nsf

This course will focus on at least four moments of exceptional activity in French cinema:

  1. the early years of dominance: Lumière, Méliès, Pathé-Frères, Gaumont, Éclair
  2. the cinéaste, ciné-club, and film magazine "revolution" of the "First Wave"
  3. the political and aesthetic ferment of the 1930s
  4. the auteur, ciné-club, and film magazine "revolution" of the "New Wave"

Our interest will encompass not only significant films and filmmakers of each moment but also the "cultural formation" within which they emerged and flourished.

The course will be taught in English; competence in speaking French is not required, but the ability to read French is recommended.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 604. Directed Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. FILMVID 600 and 601, permission of advisor and F&V Graduate Committee. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A minimum of three hours of directed research in film studies is required of all Certificate students. Every student is required to carry out a research project in film studies that represents the culmination of their Certificate studies. This written project will be based on individual reading and screening lists. Students who choose to write a dissertation which incorporates film to a significant degree are encouraged to use this directed research as preparation. In this case, the research project may take the form of a chapter of the dissertation, but the project is expected to vary according to the individual student. The directed research must be approved by the student's Certificate faculty advisor, the advisor in the home unit, and the Film & Video Studies Graduate Committee.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for FILMVID.


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This page was created at 8:11 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.


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