College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in French


This page was created at 8:11 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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FRENCH 414. Advanced Business French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 Meets with Business Administration 415.001 and 415.451.

Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FRENCH 380. A maximum of six credits of FRENCH 380, 414, and BA 415 may be counted toward a degree. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is offered as the continuation in the French Business sequence, which begins with French 380 (Intermediate Business French). FR380 is not a pre-requisite and may not be taken following FR414.

During this class, we will deepen our linguistic and cultural awareness of the French-speaking business world. We will study and practice both written and spoken commercial French within their true cultural context.

Themes covered during the semester will include banking, advertising, product marketing, claims and disputes, company organization and hierarchy. The mechanics of job application in French will be covered in detail as will possible scenarios encountered once accepted into a company.

Required written assignments will concentrate on commercial correspondence, stressing the traditional nature of written business French. Oral work will include the practice of communication and integration in both formal and social business settings.

A series of business culture videos will be viewed and used to direct discussion about the differences (both perceived and real) between business interactions in the francophone world and the U.S.

Texts:
Parlons Affaires
Le Français Commercial
Course Pack

Attendance is mandatory. No auditors. Maximum enrollment is 25.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 466. Literature of the Twentieth Century.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 Parisian Blues: The Interwar Period.

Instructor(s): Alina M Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Three courses in FRENCH numbered 300 or above. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The period that separates the two world wars in France is usually defined by contrast between the frivolous extravaganzas of the 20's, and the somber, violent mood of the 30's. And indeed, the financial crash of 1929 provides a literal closing to a spell of exuberant spending and consumption. In this course we will focus, however, on what the 20's and 30's have in common, in spite of their contrasting appearances, namely a deep sense of anxiety and insecurity. The near-defeat France experienced in the First World War generated a wide-spread unease about the country's role as a (colonial) world power, its cultural pre-eminence, and national identity. To probe this social malaise, we will examine some of the cultural productions of the interwar period, especially those in which aesthetic and sexual experiment coexist with, or betray a sense of deadlock and confinement. Readings will include poems by Cendrars, Desnos, and Eluard; surrealist novels (Breton's Nadja, and Crevel's Babylon); V. Margueritte's "La Garçonne," and Colette's La Vagabonde, and essays by Breton, Bataille, and Artaud. Other forms of representation (painting, photography, and film), and cultural production (exhibitions, music-hall, ballet) will also be discussed, depending on the students' background and interests. Evaluation will be based on participation in class discussion, and two 10-page essays.

Essays may be written in either English or French, but they need to undergo a series of revisions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 640. French Cinema.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Abel

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/filmvid/603/001.nsf

See Film and Video Studies 640.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 652. Studies in 16th Century French Literature.

Section 001 Marguerite de Navarre: Strained Earnestness : Modernity and Fundamentalism.

Instructor(s): George P Hoffmann (georgeh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

When does the "willing suspension of disbelief" elicited by literature become a practice of religious belief? We tend to imagine the early conscience in the crystalline tones of Gregorian chant and with the fixity of buttressed masonry it is a deeply impoverishing view to take on the age-old problem of finding meaning to life. Marguerite de Navarre's lifelong quest for spiritual fulfillment led her to explore various psychosomatic, psychological, and aesthetic methods for inducing within herself a sense of conviction. Her more ardent experience of piety construed holiness as a state of mind rather than a particular set of activities, in what one might call an imitatio fidei, or "imitation of faith." Though fundamentalism is typically presented as antithetical to many of the core values of modernity, this course poses the hypothesis that it was the new insistence upon an emphatic faith that demanded sincerity on the part of the individual, over and above simple assent, that ushered in our current era of fundamentalisms, be they scientific or religious.

Readings will be drawn from Marguerite's varied corpus of theatrical productions, private letters, mystical-devotional lyric, and profane, comic-tragic stories in order to give a broad overview of this crucial political player and key author of the French Renaissance. Discussion will be supplemented with readings drawn from literary criticism as well as the new histories of early modern religious experience and secularism. One presentation, six short response papers, one close reading, and one final essay will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 655. Studies in 19th Century French Literature.

Section 001 Forms of Autobiography.

Instructor(s): Michele Hannoosh

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Nineteenth-century France was preoccupied, to a point of near-obsession, with autobiographical writings. Diaries and journals, memoirs, life-stories autobiography in its various forms attracted most of the major artists and intellectuals of the time, transforming a sparse and relatively unexploited genre into one of extraordinary richness and complexity. On the one hand, the flourishing of autobiography was part of the emphasis on self and individuality that characterized European Romanticism in the political, philosophical and aesthetic spheres. On the other hand, it might be considered a symptom of, and response to, a moment of historical crisis and transition: the world both chaotic and exhilarating, bewildering and exciting opened up by the French Revolution.

In this seminar, we will study some of the outstanding examples of this most "interdisciplinary" of genres, practices by painters and poets, musicians, historians and novelists alike, a genre located at the cross-roads of art and life, criticism and history, public and private. We will examine the relation of autobiography to primary issues of the emerging modern culture: individualism, egalitarianism, liberty, social collectivism. We will consider the status of memory, time, the past, and the crucial role of writing. We will also consider the material conditions of writing and publication, e.g., exile, serialization, the sale of posthumous publication-rights, the "capitalization" or "commodification" of the self. Studying a variety of forms by writers having different concerns and interests, often in a dialogue with their own particular art, will permit us to assess the importance of autobiography and its special place within modern literature and society.

The mark will be based on a term paper (60%), an oral presentation (25%), and contribution to the seminar (25%).

The class will be held in French.

Readings:

  • Chateaubriand, Mêmoires d'outre-tombe, books 1-12 (Livre de poche);
  • Stendhal, Vie de Henry Bruland (Gallimard);
  • Sand, Histoire de ma vie, Part I, chap. 1-3; Part V (Pirot)
  • Delacroix, Journal (photocopy);
  • Berlioz, Mémoires (Flammarion);
  • Michelet, Journal, t. I (Gallimard); and
  • Dumas, Mes Mémoires (Bouquins).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 680. Studies in Literary Theory.

Section 001 Meets with Romance Language Teaching Methods 682.001.

Instructor(s): William R Paulson (wpaulson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Romance Language Teaching Methods 682.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 681. Problems in Literary Criticism.

Section 001 Loved Philology. Meets with ROMLANG 680.001 and SPANISH 650.001.

Instructor(s): Catherine Brown

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/romlang/680/001.nsf

See Romance Language Teaching Methods 680.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 899. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FRENCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FRENCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for FRENCH.


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