College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in German


This page was created at 8:12 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Astrid Billes Beck (astridb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: GERMAN 325/326. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

GERMAN 426 is devoted to enhance the writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills of advanced students of German. We will use various approaches to improve your proficiency. You are expected to read newspaper articles, stories, and see films, which will serve as a foundation for compositions and discussions. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages, and a subsequent grammatic correction of the composition.

All class members are expected to give a class presentation, and lead a discussion. The final grade is based on the compositions, class presentation, and class participation. German will be used exclusively in this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: GERMAN 325/326. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

GERMAN 430 / BA 499. Doing Business in German.

Section 451.

Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg

Prerequisites: GERMAN 350, or one 300-level courses beyond GERMAN 232. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goals of GERMAN 430 are to increase the level of proficiency in all four areas of German (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) while expanding and expounding on particular topics and areas of interest in the German business world. In addition to becoming more competent in appropriate interactive forms and practices of the German business world, such as forms of communication, organization, and negotiation, students will also delve into such other aspects of German business as business technology, product fairs, partnership in the EU, trade, raw materials and protection of the environment, agriculture, marketing and advertisement, competition, and some very German concepts such as "Mitbestimmung" and "Berufslehre."

This course further develops the student's competence to function both knowledgably and culturally correct in a German business setting. The materials used in the course consist of a course pack, German business texts from major German professional journals and newspapers, German business reports, and videotapes. Short papers and one term research paper will be required, as well as oral reports on findings of the papers and on other topics of interest. The course is conversation-oriented, and will be conducted in German.

This term, GERMAN 430 will also include a two-week unit on producing Power Point business presentations. This unit will be offered through the computer lab in the LRC.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 432 / SOC 425. The German Model: Business, Labor, and the State in the 20th Century.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeremy Brooke Straughn (straughn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Since the 19th century, the political economy of Germany has developed a particular form of capitalism said to display uniquely German features. After providing some historical background and orientation, this seminar will focus mainly on the postwar Germanys and will cover the development of the West German political system, welfare state, and industrial relations, as well as the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) and challenges of reunification. The course is designed for German and social science concentrators with an interest in political economy. Assignments may include weekly presentations and short analysis papers, as well as a major research paper at the end.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 449. Special Topics in English Translation.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 – Literature for Psychologists. Meets with COMPLIT 384.001 and PSYCH 401.004.

Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck (smwei@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May be elected up to three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Comparative Literature 384.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 457. Twentieth Century German Fiction.

Section 001 – New Women, New Novels.

Instructor(s): Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the role of literature in the history of the Women's Movement. Focusing mainly on novels published in Germany since the end of the 19th Century, we will look at the way literary discourses have participated in the transformation of gender roles. From its beginnings in the late 19th century until its last peak in the 1960s, the German Women's Movement looked for literature that could lead the way to new forms of femininity. Throughout the century, feminist theorists and writers have explored the utopian dimension of literary discourse. They have searched for heroines who could bridge the gap between the traditional 19th-century stereotype of woman as "angel in the house" and the as yet unrealized world of future possibilities for women with full citizenship, educational, political, and sexual freedom. To explore the role of women's literature in articulating the New Women we will closely analyze the representational strategies of the novels and shortstories (by Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach, Ricarda Huch, Gabriele Reuter, Helene Stöcker, Irmgard Keun und Marieluise Fleißer) themselves as well as their reception by contemporary feminists, other literary critics, and the growing (female) reading public. Readings, class discussions, and essay assignments will be in German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 459. The Literature of the German Democratic Republic.

Section 001 – Growing up in East Germany.

Instructor(s): Julia C Hell (hell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Before the fall of the wall in 1989, few West Germans were interested in the GDR. The country on the other side of the Iron Curtain just seemed strange, perhaps a little boring, definitely inaccessible. This attitude changed when the East German state suddenly disappeared. Now West Germans wanted to know what it was like to live under a dictatorship, to be a member of the communist party’s youth organization, not to be able to travel freely. When it became apparent that the reality in the East was both less horrifying and more complex than the West had imagined, the interest quickly faded again. Not so on the part of East Germans: people wanted to know where they had been living, what their lives had been like, what they had gained, and what they had lost. There was a veritable explosion of autobiographies, novels, and films about life in East Germany. In this course, we will read literary and non-literary texts about East Germany and what it felt like to grow up in the East. These texts will be supplemented by scholarly articles by historians, sociologists, and political scientists on the GDR.

Prerequisites: this is an advanced undergraduate course, which requires advanced reading knowledge. Students will be graded on their active participation (which will involve in-class presentations assigned on a regular basis) and two exams: one take-home exam, one in-class exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 492. German Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frederick Amrine (amrine@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior Honors standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

GERMAN 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, GERMAN 491. In GERMAN 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in GERMAN 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 499. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 – German Ethnicities in Literature and Film.

Instructor(s): Kader Konuk (konuk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Who is ‘German’ and to what extent do ‘German ethnicities’ exist today? Who defines what ‘belongs’ and what is ‘foreign’? In this course we will discuss contemporary literature and film in which various forms of ‘Germanness’ are explored: the work of African-German, Jewish-German, Turkish-German, Romani-German, and Japanese-German writers will be at the center of our interest (May Ayim, Renan Demirkan, Sinasi Dikmen, Fahimeh Farsaie, Barbara Honigmann, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Ceija Stojka, Yoko Tawada, Feridun Zaimoglu). We will watch and discuss some of the promising new films of German cinema such as Fatih Akin’s Kurz und Schmerzlos, Kutlug Ataman’s Lola und Billidikid, and Doris Dörrie’s Happy Birthday, Türke. We also will listen to Turkish-German hiphop and rap, discuss multicultural theater and cabaret, and talk about various approaches to ethnic communities in Germany. This course will provide essential background information for gaining an understanding of the multiplicity of cultures in Germany today. Students will be required to discuss films and texts in German, give oral presentations, write short essays and a term paper based on the weekly readings. This course can be taken for graduate credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 512. Introduction to Middle High German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The period in the evolution of the German language called Middle High German, from roughly 1050 to 1350 AD, is characterized by the spread of literacy from the clergy to some segments of the German-speaking nobility and emerging merchant class. This expanding access to the written word had a profound effect on the nature, content, and function of written texts, and the increased production of written texts provides a far more detailed picture of linguistic diversity than had been the case previously, revealing extensive changes taking place in the German dialects even as tendencies toward standardization begin to appear. The primary goal of the course is to learn to read the texts, in edited as well as original manuscript format. As we read the texts, we identify changes underway in all levels of the language, and attempt to evaluate them in terms of theories of language change and language contact. We investigate the social, political, economic, and intellectual trends and events of the day that impinge upon our linguistic analysis.

The course is designed primarily for graduate students, but qualified undergraduates are welcome. Graduate students write a research paper on some aspect of the language, and give an oral presentation on their research. Undergraduates may substitute a final examination for the research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 821. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 – Theories of Realism: Epistemology and Aesthetics. Meets with Comparative Literature 731.001.

Instructor(s): George P Steinmetz (geostein@umich.edu), Julia C Hell (hell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Comparative Literature 731.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 822. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 – German Studies Colloquium.

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GERMAN 841. Seminar: Studies in German Literature.

Section 001 – German Modernism and its Popular. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Since its inception in naturalist manifestos, German modernism was rhetorically dependent on a call to arms against popular culture. The modernist artist and writer had to redefine the role of modernism vis-à-vis a radically changing and ever widening mass audience. Focusing on the inherent connections between modernism and its popular, the seminar traces the changes that occurred in the German literary field between 1900 and 1945 with an emphasis on the interwar period. During the Weimar republic, discourses of “crisis” became epidemic and affected the cultural realm: here, the “book crisis” and the alleged crisis of the novel were perceived as signs for the eroding differentiation between high-, middle-, and low-brow culture. Looking at contemporary novels, their authors, their audiences, and their publishers in the context of these discourses we will follow up on different attempts to reestablish cultural hegemony through aesthetic interventions.

Readings include:

  • novels and essays by Vicki Baum, Alfred Bredel, Arnolt Bronnen, Elias Canetti, Alfred Döblin, Marieluise Fleisser, Ernst Jünger, Irmgard Keun, Siegfried Kracauer, Heinrich Mann, Thomas Mann, Georg Simmel; and
  • secondary literature by Pierre Bourdieu, Miriam Hansen, Andreas Huyssen, Anton Kaes, Stefan Jonsson, Helmut Lethen, and Martin Lindner.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 902. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of chair. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

GERMAN 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

GERMAN 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for GERMAN.


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This page was created at 8:12 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.


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