College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in History


This page was created at 8:13 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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HISTORY 401. Problems in Greek History II.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 SagesTyrants&CommArchaicGreece.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Chaucer Schmalz

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 412 / MEMS 414. Social and Intellectual History of the Florentine Renaissance.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Diane Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did a medieval city of bankers and cloth merchants become, in the fifteenth century, the center of an original humanist culture that offered Europeans new ways of seeing and portraying themselves and their society from artistic perspective to the writing of history? The course will trace the history of renaissance Florence not only as a chronicle of its development but also as the process by which it self-consciously constituted itself as a society and a history. Among the topics taken up will be the reshaping of the city, both physically and constitutionally; the transformation of the Medici from bankers to humanist rulers; the development of humanism into an enabling code for civil life; the new valuation of wealth and the civic use of magnificence (from palaces to wedding and funeral processions); social organization and changing attitudes toward the disempowered (slaves, Jews, the poor, women); and forms of religious expression, from confronternal devotions and processions to the fire and brimstone of prophetic preachers (e.g., Savonarola). Considerable use will be made of original sources (historical, literary, and visual). This is designed as a lecture course, but there will be ample time allotted for discussion.

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HISTORY 427. Magic, Religion, and Science in Early Modern England.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael P MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: HISTORY 220 and junior standing are recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about the "first three minutes" of the modern mental universe in actuality, about three centuries of historical time (1500-1800). It concentrates on how the "big bang" of the Protestant Reformation blasted apart a world view and a culture that had slowly developed over a thousand years. The explosive force of that strangely contingent event, renewed by subsequent eruptions of religious conflict and civil war, divided the English people culturally as never before. Magic declined, miracles and malevolent witches disappeared, the prestige of the ancient sciences of astrology and alchemy eroded. New and powerful philosophical ideas about human understanding and physical reality flourished; scientific explanations for a vast array of celestial, earthly, and mental phenomena proliferated and were embraced by laypersons as the basis of a new faith, the faith in (someone else's) reason. The world view that dominates modern English (and Western) culture emerged from almost three hundred years of charged conflict and began rapidly to evolve into contemporary scientism. And yet the shattering effect of the events that powered cultural change also made it impossible for secularization and rational religion fully to triumph. The hold of rational religion and secularism on the minds of the majority of ordinary men and women remained less complete than on the minds of the educated, governing classes. The result finally was a cultural and social realignment. The elite fashioned a "superculture" that is dominated by religious rationalism and scientistic faith; the dissenting sects, the lower classes and marginalized groups have sustained and created subcultures that are characterized by supernatural wonder and sudden infusions of spiritual and emotional energy. Much has changed since 1800 when this process was more or less completed, but these cultural and class divisions have not disappeared, and they have complicated ethnic relations as well as politics. In sum, this course is finally a meditation on how England lost its medieval mind and found its modern, divided sensibility. Principal readings will include all or part of Eamon Duffy, The Stripping of the Altars; Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic; James Sharpe, Instruments of Darkness: Witchcraft in England, 1550-1800; Peter French, John Dee: The Life of a Renaissance Magus; and Steven Shapin, The Scientific Revolution. A course pack of articles and original sources will also be required. Students will be asked to write three short (five page) papers on the readings for class; an in-class, midterm examination and a two-hour final examination.

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HISTORY 431. History of the Balkans Since 1878.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a lecture course which surveys the history of the modern Balkans the area which consists of the ex-Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Greece, and Albania from roughly 1878 to the present. There are no prerequisites nor required background. Interested first-year students should feel welcome. Grading is based on: one hour exam; a one-hour written exam; writing on one essay question out of about four; one course paper (approximately 15 pages, topic according to student interest but cleared with instructor); and a written final exam (two essay questions to be chosen from a list of about eight questions). .

Major issues to be covered are: the crisis of 1875-78 with international involvement ending with the Treaty of Berlin; Croatia and Bosnia under the Habsburgs; the development of Bulgaria after 1878; the Macedonia problem; terrorist societies; World War I; the formation of Yugoslavia; nationality problems in Yugoslavia between the Wars; German penetration and the rise of dictatorships in the inter-war Balkans; World War II with Yugoslav and Greek resistance movements (including the Greek Civil War); Tito's Yugoslavia, its 1948 break with the USSR, and Yugoslavia's special path to socialism; Nationality problems, the break-up of Yugoslavia, and the ensuing wars.

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HISTORY 434. Russia in the 20th Century: War, Revolution, and Reform.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 Meets with History 434.005.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

HISTORY 434 explores the history of revolutionary Russia and the Soviet Union. At the present moment of historical reimagining, when the Soviet past is rapidly being reconstructed to suit various contemporary needs, studying in a careful way the history of what until recently was the world's second great "super power" should provide new perspectives for students interested in the complexities of the present day world. Using novels, memoirs, documents, and other texts, HISTORY 434 will explore the utopian visions as well as the harsh social realities of the developing Soviet system, its culture, politics, economics, and imperial structures as well as the broad historical patterns underlying its collapse. While focusing on the Soviet Union, it will also attempt to link these patterns with the human predicament more generally.

The course is designed for juniors, seniors, and first year graduate students, but should be accessible to sophomores as well. It presumes no prior knowledge or Russian or European history. Undergraduates are required to attend all lectures and discussion sections, complete in a timely way all required reading, prepare two short written projects, and take a midterm and final exam.

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HISTORY 434. Russia in the 20th Century: War, Revolution, and Reform.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 005 Meets with History 434.001.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

HISTORY 434 explores the history of revolutionary Russia and the Soviet Union. At the present moment of historical reimagining, when the Soviet past is rapidly being reconstructed to suit various contemporary needs, studying in a careful way the history of what until recently was the world's second great "super power" should provide new perspectives for students interested in the complexities of the present day world. Using novels, memoirs, documents, and other texts, HISTORY 434 will explore the utopian visions as well as the harsh social realities of the developing Soviet system, its culture, politics, economics, and imperial structures as well as the broad historical patterns underlying its collapse. While focusing on the Soviet Union, it will also attempt to link these patterns with the human predicament more generally.

The course is designed for juniors, seniors, and first year graduate students, but should be accessible to sophomores as well. It presumes no prior knowledge or Russian or European history. Undergraduates are required to attend all lectures and discussion sections, complete in a timely way all required reading, prepare two short written projects, and take a midterm and final exam.

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HISTORY 451. Japan Since 1700.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leslie Pincus

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will explore the history of Japan from the dissolution of a semi-feudal system in the 18th and early 19th centuries to Japan's rise as a world economic power in the latter half of the 20th century. We will address both the major historical themes during these two centuries of radical transformation and the issues at stake in historical interpretation. The course covers:

  1. the decline of official power during the Tokugawa era and the rise of a new plebeian public sphere;
  2. Japan's coerced entry into the world market;
  3. the consolidation of a modern nation-state, industrialization, and the beginnings of Japanese imperialism in Asia;
  4. the rise of social protest and mass culture;
  5. political reaction and militarism;
  6. defeat in the Pacific War and the U.S. Occupation;
  7. postwar recovery and the contested emergence of a conservative hegemony;
  8. myths and realities of Japan's new affluent "information society."

Class sessions will combine lecture, discussion, and audio-visual. Assignments: brief critical summaries of readings; discussion panels; in-class midterm; final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 MODERN SOUTHEAST ASIA II: 1942-2000.

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrazek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The major themes of this course will be late-colonialism, nationalism, and modernization of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Siam/Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Burma) a historical conflict between the societies of the region and the global community of "developed" nations. Political, social, and intellectual history will be studied but, first of all, the course wants to be an introduction to a sensitive and well-informed reading of a broadest variety of historical sources. Individual students' interest in particular region will be fully supported.

There will be a midterm examination and a final. In addition, each student will be required to write a research paper of about 15 pages on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. The paper's topic may focus on a single country or region, or it may be comparative; use of primary sources will be especially encouraged. The primary sources may include chronicles or codes of law, travel accounts, newspapers, government documents and reports, short stories, films, novels and/or poetry. There are ample translations available, thus a knowledge of regional languages is not required.

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HISTORY 461. The American Revolution.

U.S. History

Section 005 Graduate students only. Meets with History 461.001.

Instructor(s): David J Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An intensive course on the background to the Revolution, its progress, and the changes it wrought in American life. Emphasis on America's mid-18th-century socioeconomic transformation, Britain's reorganization of her empire in the 1760s and 1770s, colonial opposition, and the emergence of a uniquely American ideology. Subsequent topics include the progress and disclocations of the military conflict, the attempt at confederation, and the culmination of the Revolutionary movement in the iteration and early development of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 463. The Origins of the American Civil War, 1830-1860.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course attempts to understand the causes of the American Civil War. It begins with a description of the society of the ante-bellum South; turns next to a portrait of Jacksonian politics and political ideology; then takes up that transmutation of Jacksonian ideals in the 1840's and 1850's through which hostile sectional stereotypes were defined. It culminates with an exploration of the sense in which the intellectual, social, religious, and economic conflicts in America came to be summarized by the slavery question during the period, because of the demands of political competition. There will be a midterm exam, a research paper of ten pages, and a two-hour final examination. Reading will average about 250 pages a week. Enrollment will be limited to forty students, in order to facilitate class discussion.

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HISTORY 464 / AMCULT 464. Race, Culture, and Politics in the Era of Civil War and Reconstruction.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hannah Rosen

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 464.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 467. The United States Since 1945.

U.S. History

Section 011 Graduate Students only. Meets with History 467.001.

Instructor(s): Matthew D Lassiter (mlassite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Topical and thematic approach to postwar United States history, including Cold War politics and culture, the rise and fall of New Deal liberalism, the power shift to the suburbs and Sunbelt, social movements of the Left and the Right, the triumph of marketing and consumer culture, and the era of globalization and its discontents. The course is divided into a lecture/discussion format that will include books, films, documentaries, fiction, and short research projects. We will engage questions such as:

  • What happened to the power base of organized labor?
  • How did the Cold War reshape postwar America?
  • How have civil rights, feminism, environmentalism, the Christian Right, and other grassroots movements/interest group politics changed American society?
  • Why is the "war" metaphor so popular in American domestic policy?
  • Were the Seventies more important than the Sixties?
  • How did the ideology of American Exceptionalism overcome the "Vietnam Syndrome"?
  • Where did your shoes actually come from?
  • How are Latinos and other new immigrant groups changing contemporary politics?
  • Are the "culture wars" finally over?
  • What global arrangements have replaced the Cold War framework?
  • Did the 1990s really mark the triumph of the "new economy"?

Students who took HISTORY 374/AMCULT 374 in Fall Academic Term 2000 should contact the instructor before enrolling in the course.

Probable texts, subject to change, include:

  • Thomas Sugrue, The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit
  • William Chafe, Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom
  • Tom Engelhardt, The End of Victory Culture: Cold War America and the Disillusioning of a Generation
  • Tim O'Brien, The Things They Carried
  • Bruce Schulman, The Seventies
  • Ruth Rosen, The World Split Open: How the Modern Women's Movement Changed America
  • Mike Davis, Magical Urbanism: Latinos Reinvent the U.S. City
  • Thomas Frank, One Market Under God.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 472. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Women in Imperial China.

Instructor(s): Mark C Elliott

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/472/001.nsf

Prerequisite: Upper-division or graduate standing. Recent years have seen a revolution in the study of women in imperial China, especially the period from the Song (960-1279) to the Qing (1644-1912) dynasties. This course introduces students to the field of Chinese women's history during this era through extensive readings in the fast-growing secondary literature as well as in selected primary sources (the latter in translation). We will examine such issues as piety, politics, education, literature, marriage, reproduction, sexuality, and work. This seminar is open to advanced undergraduates and to graduate students, with differing requirements.

Enrollment is limited to 15. Preference will be given to students with some previous coursework in Chinese studies and/or women's studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 472. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 History of Hinduism. Meets with ASIAN 455.002.

Instructor(s): Donald Davis Jr

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/asian/455/002.nsf

See Asian Studies 455.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

HISTORY 472. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 003 Sacred Text & History in India. Meets with ASIAN 455.002.

Instructor(s): Donald Davis Jr

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/asian/455/003.nsf

See Asian Studies 455.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

HISTORY 475(580). The History of American Constitutional Law.

U.S. History

Section 005.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of the evolution of American constitutional law from 1789 to the present. It will rely primarily upon reading the selections from the opinions of the U.S. Supreme Court to be found in A.T. Mason and D.G. Stephenson, Jr., eds., American Constitutional Law, and Stanley Kutler, ed., The Supreme Court And The Constitution. The goal will be to discover how the different material circumstances and social and political assumptions of each age in American history have been reflected in the Supreme Court's shifting conceptions of the meaning of the Constitution. In this way, we will seek to define how beliefs about the essential character of American republicanism have been altered through time, and in addition, to appreciate the Supreme Court's changing understanding of its own role in the constitutional order. There are no prerequisites for the course, but HISTORY 160-161 or an equivalent understanding of the general structure of American history is assumed. There will be a midterm examination of ninety minutes, a ten-page term paper, and a two-hour final examination.

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HISTORY 476(569) / LHC 412. American Business History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Lewis

Prerequisites: Junior, senior, or graduate standing. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/lhc/412/001.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 477. Law, History, and the Dynamics of Social Change.

Section 001 Race and Citizenship in Comparative Historical Perspective: The United States and Cuba, 1865-1965. Meets with Law 877. 001

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/477/001.nsf

This joint LSA/Law School seminar explores the relationship of law and society during a process of radical political and social transformation: the end of slavery and the redefining of the boundaries of race and citizenship. In the United States, male former slaves became full political participants for the brief period of Reconstruction, but massive retrenchment followed and by the early 20th century, African Americans had been virtually eliminated from Southern electoral politics. In Cuba, by contrast, shortly after slavery was abolished a large-scale cross-racial nationalist movement emerged whose legacy was a strong claim to citizenship by Afro-Cuban veterans, a claim that led to the incorporation of a guarantee of universal manhood suffrage in the Cuban Constitution of 1901. Thus at the same moment that black disfranchisement in much of the South was allowed to stand by the U. S. Supreme Court, cross-racial enfranchisement was written into the Cuban Constitution. The subsequent histories of voting and political participation in both societies were framed within this contrast, through the period of the Cuban revolution of 1959 and the U.S. Voting Rights Act of 1965.

In exploring these contrasting histories, we will read key legal cases, historical testimony, and secondary accounts, paying attention to the interplay of law, electoral politics, and other forms of collective action.

Professor Scott is the Frederick Huetwell Professor of History, and Professor of Law. Author of the book Slave Emancipation in Cuba, she is a specialist on the study of societies after slavery in the United States and Latin America.

All enrolled students will participate in the 2-hr seminar, Mondays 7-9 pm. LSA students will also participate in an extra one-hour discussion section, W 3-4, and will receive 3 credits for the course.

Copies of the draft syllabus will be available at Prof. Scott's office, 969 Legal Research.

Admission is by permission of the instructor only; open to law students, advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Please send your request, accompanied by a detailed (2 paragraph) statement of interest and background, to Prof. Rebecca Scott at rjscott@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Admission is by permission of the instructor, via email to rjscott@umich.edu.

HISTORY 477. Law, History, and the Dynamics of Social Change.

Section 002 Critical Race Theory: American Legal Culture & Construction. Meets with CAAS 495.002.

Instructor(s): Martha Jones (msjonz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/495/002.nsf

See CAAS 495.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 477. Law, History, and the Dynamics of Social Change.

Section 003 American Legal Hist Workshop. Meets with Law 851.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas A Green (tagreen@umich.edu), Susanna Blumenthal

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 Latin America, National Period. Meets with History 348.001.

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the history of Latin America from the early nineteenth century until the present. The approach is chronological and thematic. A temporal narrative will be organized around these themes:

  1. state formation, including forms of political rule and the construction of collective identities at local, national, and continental levels;
  2. elite and popular relations, including cases of rebellion, revolution, and state repression; and
  3. forms of capitalist development and transformations in class relations, ideologies of economic development, and center-periphery linkages.

The discussion of individual countries and of specific topics will be intertwined throughout the course. Classes will combine lecture and discussions. Students are required to read the assigned materials BEFORE each class and are encouraged to participate in class discussions. Written work will involve a short essay, a longer paper, a midterm, and a final. Readings will include relevant sections from a textbook, and articles, monographs, novels, short stories, newspapers and films, some of which will be selected in response to class discussion and students' interests.

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HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 The Caucasus Since the Fall of the Soviet Union.

Instructor(s): Gerard J Libaridian (glibarid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the role of ethnicity in the rise of conflicts in the Caucasus during the last century. It will examine militarized conflicts (such as in Nagorno Karabagh, Abkhazia, and Chechnya) as well as latent ones (such as Javakheti, Ajaria, and Daghestan). The evolution of ethnicity and nationalism will be studied in conjunction with the role of religion, class, Russian and Soviet nationalities policies, and more recently, of state-building in independent Armenia, Azerbaijjan, and Georgia.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 487 / ENGLISH 416 / WOMENSTD 416. Women in Victorian England.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/english/416/001.nsf

See English 416.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 495. Medieval Inner Asia.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudi P Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of Inner Asian history and its connections with the wider world. Inner Asian affairs have impinged and imposed upon the histories of the Near East, East Asia, and Russia. Besides the present importance of this vast area, the past importance of nomads in the history of Eurasia justifies a course focusing on the history of nomadism from the nomad's point of view. Among the topics to be covered are: the rise of nomadism and the nature of nomadic politics; the great nomadic enterprises: Scythians, Hsuing-Nu, Huns, Turks, and Mongols; the conflict of religions in Inner Asia; the spread of Tibetan Buddhism and the decline of nomadism; the expansion of the Russian and Ching empires; the "Great Game" and the erection of buffer states in Asia; the communist impact on Inner Asia; the problems and promise of independence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 001 Caribbean Diasporas. Meets with American Culture 505.001

Instructor(s): Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof (jessehg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 505.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 531 / AAPTIS 587. Studies in Pahlavi and Middle Persian.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot L Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 587.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 591. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 France and Its Empires. Meets with History 391.001.

Instructor(s): Maya Jasanoff

Prerequisites: Upper-class standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From 1800 to the 1960s, France ruled an empire encompassing, at its peak, 100 million people and over 10 million square kilomters, from Algiers to Timbuktu to Tahiti, and Martinique to Madagascar. How did French colonial rule transform the societies it encountered? And how did the possession of the vast and varied empire affect France itself? This seminar will look at the relationship of France and its colonies across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from "First Empire" formed by Napoleon in and beyond Europe, through the apogee of French imperial power during the Third Republic (1871-1940), up to the colonial independence movements of the mid-twentieth century and post-colonial predicaments of France today. With readings such as C.L.R. James, The Black Jacobins, Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth, and films such as the Battle of Algiers and La Haine, we will endeavor to understand the aspirations and anxieties of "greater France," and think about problems of race, identity, cross-cultural encounter, and power. Students will be able to develop a long paper (10-12pp.) on a theme and region of their choice. All readings are in English. Knowledge of French is NOT required, and no prior knowledge of French history is expected.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 593. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 Black Nationalism in Comparative Context.

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upper-class standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

As a politics of self-determination, Black nationalism shares much in common with other nationalist movements: certain forms of Black nationalism share characteristics with post-colonial nationalisms, for example. In terms of academic scholarship, however, Black nationalism is typically analyzed apart from other forms of nationalism. More precisely, it is often viewed as a distinct or even aberrant form of nationalism, one that is contingent upon "race" rather than "nation" or nation-state.

A major goal of this course, then, is to theorize nationalism and to do so by making Black nationalism the core of our analysis. We shall survey a number of definitions of nationalism and Black nationalism by scholars as well as activists; we shall review how Black nationalism has been portrayed and assessed in the historiography. One of the main components of this course is theoretical and we will be concerned with assumptions which undergird concepts of both race and nation. As recent scholarship has demonstrated, concepts of race are intimately connected to nationalist ideologies; moreover, recent literature has prodded us to think about ways in which both "race" and "nation" are and have been constructed.

The mission of this course is two-fold: it juxtaposes nineteenth- and twentieth-century African-American nationalisms with other nationalisms as it considers the very construction of nationalism. We will survey nationalist movements across the globe in order to establish an analytical framework and we shall assess ways in which various collectivities ethnic, racial, religious, economic, cultural constitute a "nation" given certain circumstances. Finally, this seminar foregrounds gender and sexuality since reproduction of the collective is integral to many nationalist endeavors.

Requirements: Given that we convene but once a week, regular attendance is nothing less than critical. Assignments include one analytical essay (5 pp.), one historiographical essay (5 pp.), and a final paper (10 pp. minimum).

Required texts include the following:

  • Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism, Revised Edition (Verso, 1991);
  • John Hutchinson & Anthony D. Smith, Nationalism (Oxford, 1994);
  • Partha Chatterjee, The Nation and Its Fragments: Colonial and Post Colonial Histories (Princeton, 1993);
  • Dean Robinson, Black Nationalism in American Politics and Thought (Cambridge, 2001).

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HISTORY 595 / CAAS 595. Topics in African History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Rise & Fall of Apartheid State. Meets with History 357.001.

Instructor(s): Keith Breckenbridge

Prerequisites: CAAS 200 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/595/001.nsf

The white supremacist state that emerged in South Africa in the 20th century was the last and the most systematically racist society on the Atlantic Basin. The history of this society is deeply interesting, partly because of the intensity of the conflicts that have shaped it for three centuries and partly because the astonishing effort to defeat racism and violence has finally succeeded. This lecture and discussion course will survey the political and economic history of South Africa from the mid-19th century to the present. We will examine the history of imperialism, the particular form of capitalist development, the relationship between South Africa and the USA, the origins and character of Apartheid, and the global effort bring about its defeat. The course will also focus throughout on developments in South Africa today. This history reflects economic and cultural processes at work in all the societies of the Atlantic Basin, and students will be encouraged to make these comparisons wherever possible. While the sequence of problems shaping the course are all taken from political and economic history, students will be encouraged to explore problems of their own in the design of a final research paper.

Readings:

  • Nelson Mandela. Long Walk to Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela
  • Dan O'Meara. Forty Lost Years
  • Deborah Posel. The Making of Apartheid, 1948-1961
  • Mamphela Ramphele and Francis Wilson. Uprooting Poverty: The South African Challenge

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HISTORY 595 / CAAS 595. Topics in African History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 Law & Society in the Colonial World. Meets with History 357.002.

Instructor(s): Catherine Burns

Prerequisites: CAAS 200 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/357/002.nsf

The great themes of the course are these: The emergence and significance of private landed property and the social relationships intertwined with the processes of land dispossession and privatization in England; concomitant ideas about human liberty and the rule of law; the use of state violence and capital punishment; the codification of wage labour relationships; the cementing of gender and racial distinctions into law; the transportation of convicts; the enslavement of human beings; the indenturing of contracted labour; the seizure of people and their labour, of land and natural resources through colonial conquest; and the many contradictions and dynamics of these in their inter-relation with the laws and societies of the dispossessed and the conquered. Many of these themes are tackled in courses on Law and Society in the Americas or Europe. In this course the complex intertwining of social change and the making and practice of law over the last 300 years will be tackled from the point of view of Africans, and South Africans in particular.

This course is based on a series of five debates, taking up key areas of law and its movement through space and time in the period of European colonization of North America, Asia and Africa. The course culminates in a detailed study of law and society in South Africa. Starting on territory familiar to many students of USA history, Western philosophy and Western legal systems, the course charts the movement of ideas and practices concerning private property and ownership (including ownership of people) outwards from 18th-century Europe to Australia, North America, India and finally to the West and then the Southern coasts of Africa.

  1. The first debate centers around crime and punishment in the late 1700s and early 1800s in England where crimes against capital were considered so egregious that capital punishment was meted out for forgery and yet this was also an age in which utilitarianism took root and Bethamite systems of rehabilitation were implemented. Students will raise issues here that carry across the Atlantic and Indian oceans: what were the constraints upon a radical interpretation of the ideas and practices of the Enlightenment in the context of England itself, let alone the societies colonized by it in the succeeding centuries?
  2. The second debate centers on the violent settlement of Australia by ships filled with transported and convicted felons banished from English metropolitan centers in the midst of a perceived crime epidemic. What ideas of ideas of reform and of the rights of people were rooted in these acts and practices?
  3. The third debate introduces the complex issue of local and indigenous versus English law: as "customary law" became codified alongside English law in colonies as diverse as India and Natal, what were the consequences for law and society in these regions? The contested history of widow immolation in India forms the case study that forms the basis of the Indian debate that draws these threads together.
  4. In the fourth debate we move to Africa and contemplate the impact of English legal ideas and practices percolated through the beans of the American, Australian, and Indian experiences in the English conquest of West and then East and Southern Africa. What were the roots of policies of indirect rule and segregation? Can they be traced back to the English social and economic transformations of the middle 1700s? How did they shift, reform, give way in the face of local contexts and responses?
  5. Finally, the course culminates with a detailed examination of law and society in 19th- and 20th-century South Africa: again violence, freedom, land dispossession, labour relationships, racially codified laws; gender distinction; the legal framing of private property; and debates about freedom and the rule of law frame the readings.
.

We conclude the course with a course-wide debate on a topic from the final theme, chosen by students in collaboration with the instructor for its roots in the past, but with a burning relevance to contemporary debates around law and society in a post colonial society, such as post-1994 South Africa.

Students write two short papers, prepare two small group debates and one large class-wide debate and write one longer paper on a theme arising from the course which they develop in collaboration with the instructor.

Representative readings include extracts from the works of: Hay, Linebaugh, Foucault, Lani, Chatterjee, Spivak, Mamdani, Chanock, Cooper, Prakash, Hughes, Stoler, Northrup, Beinart, and Davenport.

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HISTORY 596. Directed Area Studies.

Section 001 Information, Technology, and the Transformation of Work. Meets with SI 510.001.

Instructor(s): Keith Breckenbridge

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/596/001.nsf

The rapid development of information technologies has had powerful effects on the organisation of work. This process may have been happening for a long time, but it is definitely happening with unprecedented intensity now. In the wealthy industrial societies in North America, Europe, and Asia workers have moved out of life-long careers in factories and offices into a variety of jobs, associations, and venues. In these places the problem of work is often a problem of too much work  of too many tasks requiring too much learning. Outside of what used to be called the First World, the problem is different. Here the problem is often the disappearance of work. In both types of society, the industrial workforce seems almost to have vanished as a political and social phenomenon. And in both places the changes seem to have been wrought by the relentlessly expanding powers of information technology.

In this seminar course, we will examine the contemporary problem of the effects of information and technology on work using two related lenses. We will study the ways in which science and technology changed industrial work in the twentieth century, and explicitly compare these earlier scientific transformations with more contemporary changes in the development of networked and computer-based workplaces. And we will examine how these processes have played out globally, exploring the ways in which science and technology have shaped the organisation of work in societies outside of the West.

Representative readings:

  • Michael Adas. Machines As the Measure of Men: Science, Technology, and Ideologies of Western Dominance.
  • International Labour Organisation. World Employment Report 2001: Life at Work in the Information Economy. (CDRom).
  • A Nation Transformed by Information: How Information has shaped the United States from Colonial Times to the Present. Edited by Alfred D Chandler and James W Cortada.
  • Chris Benner. Work in the New Economy: Flexible Labour Markets in Silicon Valley.
  • Peter Evans. Embedded Autonomy: States and Industrial Transformation.
  • Gill Hart. Disabling Globalization: Places of Power in Post-Apartheid South Africa.
  • David Noble. Forces of Production: a social history of industrial automation.
  • Anson Rabinbach. The Human Motor: Energy, fatigue and the origins of modernity.
  • Shoshana Zuboff. Work in the Age of the Smart Machine.

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HISTORY 603 / ANTHRCUL 640. Seminar in Anthropology and History.

Section 001 Nature and Modernity. Meets with Anthropology 658.001

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu), Sharad Chari (schari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 640.001.

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HISTORY 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

Section 001 Technology, Colonialism, and Development.

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Hecht (hechtg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Technological artifacts, processes, knowleges, and ideologies have played a major role in shaping relationships between conquerors and native peoples, metropoles and colonies, and the First and Third Worlds. In the 17th and 18th centuries, guns, bows and arrows, and ships were vital in the European conquest of Africa and the Americas, as well as in resistance and response to that conquest. In the 19th and 20th centuries, infrastructural technologies, such as railroads, irrigation, or urban planning, were important instruments of colonial rule. Power and social relationships were often negotiated through knowlege and practices concerning land, water, and people. The ideologies of technological progess that helped drive and legitimate colonial rule continued on into the post-World War II period, serving as underpinnings for efforts to develop the Third World. Today, technological systems form the infrastructures for what many refer to as globalization.

This course takes a historical and anthropological approach to exploring the role of technology in colonialism, development, and globalization. We will pay close attention to the diversity of the historical actors involved in these processes, and focus on the ways in which politically and culturally constructed technologies are involved in the formation of power relationships.

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HISTORY 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

Section 003 Methods Seminar: Anthropology, History and the Politics of Comparison.

Instructor(s): Ann Stoler (astoler@umich.edu), Nancy Rose Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 640.001.

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HISTORY 611. The Literature of American History.

Section 001 Literature of American History.

Instructor(s): Maria E Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu), Mary C Kelley

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Juniors or seniors with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/611/001.nsf

The purpose of this graduate seminar is to introduce first-year graduate students to certain important topics within the monographic literature of American history. It will by no means attempt to be exhaustive, either in terms of chronological or topical coverage. Rather the goal is to concentrate on a few areas that have been and/or now seem of importance within the field and to examine critically a central text helping to define major issues and avenues of research. The format will be as follows: one common text (normally an entire book) per week plus reports by two seminar members each on a different supplemental text. Writing requirements include two short book reviews plus a final substantial bibliographic essay.

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HISTORY 612 / AMCULT 616. Native American History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): GREGORY E DOWD

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 616.001.

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HISTORY 621 / WOMENSTD 621. Studies in Women's History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Upper classmen with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to explore the issues, controversies, theory, and paradigms developed in U.S. women's and gender history in the last thirty years. Emphasis will be placed on an introduction to the historiography, methodology, content and theory of this rich field, and how it can further our knowledge and understanding of the past and the present.

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HISTORY 623 / ECON 664. Problems in American Economic History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren C Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401, 402, and 405 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Economics 664.001.

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HISTORY 625. Studies in Balkan History.

Section 001 Balkan History.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 626. Studies in Byzantine History.

Section 001 Byzantine History.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 632 / GREEK 631. Studies in Greek History.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): David S Potter

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 638. Studies in Medieval History.

Section 001 Rome After Empire.

Instructor(s): Paolo Squatriti (pasqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Rome after Empire" investigates the history of the city of Rome in the centuries after the collapse of the Roman empire, between roughly 300 and 1200. To do so the course mixes archaeological and textual approaches to postclassical Rome. The course presents the Romans as active agents in the reformulation of the city as an ideological construct (symbol of legitimacy and longevity and excellence in government), and also as participants in a social and physical context in which historical vestiges were an unavoidable element. It shows the ongoing debate with the burdens of the past among those who bore them, and the creative adaptations with which successive generations of Romans articulated their sense of what mattered about their special location in the world.

This course may be taken to satisfy the history department's research seminar requirement, by arrangement with the instructor.

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HISTORY 641. Studies in 20th Century European History.

Section 001 STUDIES IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY GERMAN HISTORY.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey H Eley (ghe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended primarily for students planning to specialize in Modern German History for their dissertation work. Students who anticipate preparing a field in German History should also take this course. It will usually be offered once a year, with alternating emphases on the 19th and 20th centuries. It aims to provide grounding in the contemporary and classical literatures of the German field by inducting students into an intensive familiarity with the contexts, interpretations, research, and debates concerning the Weimar Republic, Third Reich, and post-1945 eras. The primary readings each week will be in English, but students should also expect to develop a close knowledge of the literatures in German too. Non German historians are certainly welcome in this course, providing they acknowledge the primary orientations mentioned above.

The requirements are to keep up with the reading; participate in discussion; work up detailed bibliographies to accompany each of the weekly sessions; and produce a substantial historiographical paper by the term's end. The paper should be a critical treatment of the literature surrounding some manageable topic arising from the term's work, and should be around 20-30 typed double-spaced pages in length. Those aiming for a major field in German history should use the paper as an aid to specifying the nature of their potential dissertation interests. The range of potential paper topics may be extremely flexible, but particular topics will need to be developed in direct and close consultation with me. The paper should be finalized in the form of a short prospectus (a problem statement plus bibliography) to be handed in by Monday, March 10. Copies of the prospectus should be made available to all members of the class. Final submission of the paper will be by Friday, April 25. THERE WILL BE NO INCOMPLETES.

I will also be asking everyone to introduce several class discussions by precirculating brief agendas of questions arising from the weekly reading. Finally, everyone will be responsible for working up a bibliography appropriate to the reading and topic of each weekly session, copies to be handed to me when the relevant class meets. The purpose of this requirement is to formalize the bibliographical work associated with the schedule of weekly readings, which is an essential part of your grounding in the literatures of the field. Books for the course will be available at Shaman Drum Bookshop.

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HISTORY 660. Studies in 16th and 17th Century England.

Section 001 Topics in Sixteenth-, Seventeenth- and (if there is a demand) Eighteenth-Century English History.

Instructor(s): Michael P MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will be organized as a weekly discussion of a topic chosen from within a very broad theme we shall stick with for all or most of the term. Each topic will address a significant and controverted historical problem, and the readings will introduce students to the problem and some of the most important historical scholarship concerning it. The instructor and the class members will construct reading lists for each topic to be covered that include the key works about it. These will always exceed in number and length the amount that could be assigned for weekly reading, and therefore each student in the course will select two problems early on in the term and will be responsible for:

  1. helping to draw up the bibliography of essential readings,
  2. selecting a reasonable and representative amount to be read by the class as a whole for discussion and
  3. leading the discussion (to the extent that you can shut Michael up).

Each student will also choose one of his/her topics as the subject of a review essay of 15-20 pages that could be used (and will be used) by other students in mastering the field for prelims, dissertation background, etc. At the end of the course students should have a good grasp of the sort of scholarship being done in early modern English history, some of the key players and the ways to identify scholarship relevant to topics in the field. He or she should also know the literature on one or two key and important subjects in depth. The overall theme of the course and hence the range of allowable topics for the term will be decided partly by the needs and interests of the students enrolled and partly by the instructor's sense of the most essential fields.

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HISTORY 676. Studies in Modern Japanese History.

Section 001 Modern Japan.

Instructor(s): Leslie Pincus

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

History 676 is an introductory graduate course for students planning to write a dissertation in modern Japanese studies or take a field in the same area. The course is designed to familiarize students with thematic topics as well as historiographical and theoretical issues in the field of modern Japanese history. While readings are primarily in English language sources, students are encouraged to read specific sources in Japanese. This term the course will trace a complex and often troubled discourse on the "modern" through its late nineteenth and twentieth century vicissitudes. Beginning with the Tokugawa-to-Meiji transition and the endeavor to assimilate new forms of western-derived knowledge, we will turn to later Meiji reflections on the effects of this (self)imposed modernization on social and cultural life. We then move to the critical interrogations of the modern, both reactionary and progressive, of the interwar years and end with postwar attempts to complete or revise the "unfinished project" of modernity. Along with primary and secondary works in Japanese history, we will broaden the inquiry with select readings of a comparative and theoretical nature.

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HISTORY 678. Studies in the History of Modern South Asia.

Section 001 Imagination, Pain, Anger, and Love.

Instructor(s): Nita Kumar (nitak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: HISTORY 457 or 458. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the 19th and 20th centuries, especially 1850s to 1940s, and on selected topics revolving around class, gender, and methodology. It is in four unequal parts. The first, Imagination, includes a study of the intelligentsia, intellectual systems, emerging disciplines, languages and styles. The second part, Pain, deals with social difference and colonial constraints. The third part, Anger, focuses on reform movements, particularly as targeting women, and women's own roles. The fourth part, Love, looks at the arts, especially at everyday life, humour, and love. Additionally, in the course we will constantly discuss methodology, including our own imagination, pain, anger, and love for and towards South Asia. The aim of the course is to read carefully the most influential of the recent literature on South Asia and, while working on different research topics, make an original case about the very original modernity(ies) of South Asia.

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HISTORY 680. Studies in Early American History I.

Section 001 Religion & Culture in the Atlantic World 1500-1800.

Instructor(s): Susan M Juster (sjuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/680/001.nsf

Religion was the very foundation of early modern culture and thought in both the Old and the New Worlds. Its reach extended from the high culture of the great cathedrals to the pictures and Bibles which adorned the homes of peasants to the burial rites of slave communities. In this course, we will examine early modern Euro-American religious beliefs and practices, with the emphasis on religion as lived experience rather than formal doctrine. Beginning with the Reformation and Counter-Reformation battles of the 16th century, we will explore the place of religion in the economic, political, social, and cultural life of British Americans and their Caribbean counterparts. By the "Atlantic World," I mean largely the geopolitical sphere of Anglo-America in the Age of Exploration, though we will also consider the place of African and Native American spirituality in North America and the British Caribbean. Some of the specific topics to be covered include: the role of women and gender in religious life, the origins of revivalism and the creation of an evangelical temperament, religion as sacred theater, the African roots of slave religion and the role of religion in slave rebellions, the conversion of Amerindians and the nativist revivals of the late eighteenth century, and the relationship of religion to print culture and the market economy. The readings will be a blend of old classics and new works, and students will be expected to supplement the required texts with additional readings on topics in which they have a special interest.

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HISTORY 691. Studies in Latin American and Caribbean History.

Section 001 Fam/Gender/Ethnicity LatinAmer. Meets with Women's Studies 698.004.

Instructor(s): Sueann Caulfield (scaul@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; undergraduates with permission of instructor. Reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is highly desirable. HISTORY 348 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 001 Bodies: Discourses/Corporeal. Meets with AMCULT 699.008 and WOMENSTD 698.001.

Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sexuality pervades the modern world. It is central to our definitions of pleasure and pain, central to our self-image, central as well to the production and deployment of power and knowledge. It dominates both popular culture and high theory. In its more violent forms, rape, for example, or castration, sexuality plays a critical role in the creation of modern nation states and national identities. (The bodies of raped women guard the borders of modern India and Pakistan, Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia.) Sexualized rhetoric legitimated Europe's domination of the world. The sexual exploitation of Native American and African women has characterized European/African/American relations from the 15th to the 20th century. On the domestic front, for the past 30 years, sexual issues have dominated Congressional debates, Supreme Court decisions, national and local elections. They have cloaked the New Right and extended governmental power into the most private spheres.

This course explores the modern construction of sexuality, beginning with the Renaissance. We will explore examples drawn from Europe, the Americas, and South Asia. We will examine the central role sexuality plays in the production of modern knowledge/power grids, the embodiment of modern republican states, nationalist and colonizing projects. Our focus will be multidisciplinary and cross cultural. We will work to locate sexual beliefs and practices within specific cultures, times, and social groups. The impact of class, race, and gender will be central to our analyses. The course will begin with Sigmund Freud and Michel Foucault, move on to an exploration of French psychoanalytic feminism with works by Julia Kristeva, Luce Irigaray, and Rosi Braidotti, explore the suggestions of symbolic anthropologist Mary Douglas, critical legal theorist Drucilla Cornell, feminist poststructuralists Sue Ellen Case and Judith Butler, political scientist Carole Pateman. We will read novels and short stories, watch movies, read histories. We will examine aspects of homosexuality and heterosexuality, incest, slavery, abortion, prostitution, pornography, transvestism and still other aspects of everyday sexuality.

This course is a colloquium not a research seminar. Focus will be on the weekly readings and on class discussions. Consequently, there will be no research paper. Rather, class members will be responsible for writing a 1-2 page paper each week analyzing the week's readings. These papers must be handed in at the beginning of each class meeting. If you have not read the assignments and do not have a paper, please do not come to class. Class discussions only work if all members of the class are fully prepared and ready to enter into analysis and debate. Remember there are never any right or wrong answers. The only error is silence.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 002 Engendering Nation/Citizenship. Meets w/ WOMENSTD 698.002 and AMCULT 699.009.

Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu), Sonya O Rose (sorose@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The late eighteenth century saw the emergence of two radical new political forms the republican state and the republican citizen. Both were products of the Age of Revolution, of the American, French and Haitian Revolutions. Both posed a series of republicans: of what did republican citizenship consist? What were the republican citizens rights and responsibilities? His (and then it was always his) relation to the state, to the common good and most especially to his political representative. What specific rights did popular sovereignty entail? As republics became liberial republican nations, how were the brave promises of America's Declaration of Independence, France's Rights of Man and Haiti's insistance on the rights of Africans to full citizenship compromised and contained? This course will explore the foundational political discourses concerning the right of the republican citizen; the way the eighteenth-century's three great revolutions exposed the contradictions imbedded in republican and liberial concepts of citizenship, the way these rights have always been engendered and colored by Western racism and misogyny. The seminar will also explore criticisms of present definitions of citizenship, primarily from post-colonial, race studies, and feminist perspectives. We will explore questions around slavery and emancipation in the West Indies and the United States. The seminar will end by exploring present feminist criticism of liberalism, especially entailed issues around pornography, abortion, and affirmative action. If our timing is right, we will literally end with an examination of the Supreme Court decision relating to affirmative action at the University if Michigan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 003 Feminism, Gender and the Chinese Modernity. Meets with Women's Studies 698.003.

Instructor(s): Zheng Wang

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 698.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 700. Independent Research Seminar.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows faculty to offer required seminar work to graduate students on an individual basis during terms when their regular seminars are not scheduled to be offered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 744. Seminar in Russian History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: See Bulletin. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This graduate seminar is oriented toward students in the East European area, broadly defined, but others are welcome. Although there is some common introductory work on methodological issues and the nature of "scholarly article", the primary task of seminar participants is a research project in their own area of specialization with a goal toward publication. The seminar typically includes graduate students from several departments. Students are expected to critique each other's work as well as present their own in its different moments of development.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 786 / CAAS 786. Seminar in African History.

Section 001 Colonial/PostColonial Africa.

Instructor(s): Mamadou Diouf (mdiouf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores two related questions:

  1. the constitution of a body of representations, texts, and images which "invented Africa" (V.Y. Mudimbe) during the colonial era; and
  2. the ways in which Africa and African societies were both conceptualized and imagined, intellectually and emotionally by Africans and people of African descent.

The seminar will use B. Schwartz definition of intellectual history that is

"by no means exclusively concerned with the intellectual life as self-subsistent realm as the so-called history of ideas but with human consciousness as related to historical situations in which we found ourselves".

We will investigate both depictions and representations of Africa in contrast with African "traditions" as exposition of self-knowledge and practices.

The objectives of this seminar are the development and completion of a research paper. Class sessions will provide the factual, theoretical, and conceptual tools to undertake your own research and posit your own analysis paying attention to the intellectual/emotional context of the topic selected. Along the way, you will undertake close readings of different texts, engage in archival research, produce a bibliography of materials relevant to your project, and present your work.

Each week, two students will be responsible for leading a vibrant discussion of readings. S/he should feel free to bring other texts not listed on the syllabus into his/her discussion.

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HISTORY 795 / REES 795 / POLSCI 795 / ECON 795 / GEOG 795 / RUSSIAN 795. Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 795.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 796. Topics in History.

Section 001 Colonial Postcolonial/IndigenousHistory: Pacific Island Region. Meets with AMCULT 699.006.

Instructor(s): Damon I Salesa (salesa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The discipline of history, and historical discourse more broadly, has often been significant in colonial practice. This course takes these moments as a starting point, and focusing on the Pacific island region, examines such colonial and postcolonial encounters through the histories they produced.

Given such a broad topic, attention will be focused both regionally and thematically. Islands such as Samoa, Marquesas, Hawai'i and New Zealand will be of particular concern, as will colonial administrators, anthropologists, collectors, missionaries, scientists, and academics. This, however, is not simply a traditional historiographical course. In class we will explore different indigenous modes, styles, and genres of history. These will include genres such as the nationalist written histories produced after formal decolonization, as well as forms less familiar outside of the islands, including oral literatures, poetry, music, and film. Particular attention will be given to indigenous historical discourse in the form of genealogies, the predominant form of island history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 796. Topics in History.

Section 002 History & Making of Knowledge.

Instructor(s): John S Carson (jscarson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this graduate research seminar is to prepare participants to produce a substantial research paper based principally on published, electronic, and/or unpublished primary sources on topics related to the making and meanings of knowledge broadly construed. To that end, we will examine selected topics in the field of intellectual/cultural history that are currently the focus of significant theoretical or empirical discussion including the ways in which knowledge is made, used, interpreted, and disseminated. We also will investigate sources and methods for doing intellectual/cultural historical research, as well as discuss the possibilities and limitations that various types of primary sources present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 804. Reading for the General Examination.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/history/grad/PreliminaryExamFields.html

The preliminary examinations ensure that students have acquired the necessary background for teaching and scholarship in history. Field requirements for the prelim encourage a combination of breadth and depth. Normally, students will prepare at least one geographical/temporal field, usually the major field, and at least one distribution field different in area and/or time from the major field. Students will customize another field to the specific needs, in consultation with their advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies. This field can be geographical, temporal, topical, or methodological. Students are also required to offer a cognate field in another discipline or interdisciplinary program on a subject that will enrich their preparation for teaching and research in history. Other programs may be pursued with the approval of the Graduate Committee.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 824. Seminar in Late Imperial China.

Section 001 Late Imperial China.

Instructor(s): James Lee, Mark C Elliott

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of Chinese. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Prequisite: Graduate standing. Reading knowledge of modern and classical Chinese. Knowledge of Japanese and/or Manchu desirable.
This is a course in research methodologies for late imperial Chinese history. Students will be introduced to the range of sources available for research in Min-Qing history, including official histories, institutional compendia, gazetteers,collectanea, biographical materials, "jottings" literature, maps, archives, and so on. The course also provides training in the use of dictionaries, encyclopedias, and finding aids. Weekly meetings will combine discussions of particular types of materials with practice in reading and interpreting Qing documents. Requirements include weekly presentations, preparation of documents readings, and a final research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 825 / CHIN 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The essay is a substantial research paper reflecting interdisciplinary training and the ability to use the Western language literature and Chinese language sources. It is normally written in the three-credit interdepartmental research seminars (825 or 802) and registered for under the department most closely aligned with the thesis topic and readers. The essay must be read and approved by two Center for Chinese Studies faculty members from different disciplines, both of whom will grade it. Preliminary work on the Master's Essay could begin in any of the advanced research/writing courses. Students may petition to use two seminar papers that have received grades of "A" as a substitute for the Master's Essay. All such petitions should be submitted to the China Center as formal letters of request and accompanied by complete copies of both of the graded papers. These petitions will be forwarded for review by a committee selected by the CCS Director and consisting of at least two faculty members.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 898. Dissertation Colloquium Candidacy.

Instructor(s): Martha Jones (msjones@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the Dissertation Colloquium for doctoral students nearing the job market stage is required, although official enrollment for one credit is optional.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 900. Preparation for Preliminary Examinations.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Normally to be taken only in the term in which a student plans to take his general preliminary examinations. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an ungraded course of one to six credits which students nearing their preliminary examination elect. It may be taken in the term before or during which the student plans to take the examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


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