College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in History of Art


This page was created at 8:13 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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HISTART 403 / ENVIRON 403 / NRE 403. History of Human Interaction with the Land.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth A Brabec (ebrabec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). Laboratory fee ($30) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/nre/403/001.nsf

See Environment 403.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 415 / WOMENSTD 415. Studies in Gender and the Arts.

Section 001 Gender & Visual Arts.

Instructor(s): Patricia Simons (patsimon@umich.edu), Celeste Brusati (cbrusati@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and one course in women's studies or history of art. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course looks at the conditions of production that enabled the emergence of European women as independent artists in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Our primary focus will be on the Netherlands and Italy, but comparative material will be drawn from England, Spain and elsewhere. We will be looking at spaces and modes of production, such as courts, convents, and cities, and the social networks of patronage, marketing, and gift exchange within which women made and viewed art. Our investigations will concentrate on areas in which women artists made notable achievements, such as still life, portraiture, and self-portraiture. The religious sphere was also a major venue for women's cultural production in such areas as theatre, music, visual imagery, and patronage. Other topics to be considered include the engagement of women in other areas of visual culture, e.g., needlework, calligraphy, anatomical wax models.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 434 / CLARCH 434. Archaic Greek Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa Nevett

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 434.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 439 / CLARCH 439. Greek Vase Painting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sharon C Herbert (sherbert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 439.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 461. "Clashes" and Cultures: The Interconnected Visual Worlds of Eurasia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin Powers (mpow@umich.edu), Sussan Babaie (sbabaie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of instructor.

HISTART 473. Twentieth-Century Architecture.

Section 001 Meets with Architecture 543.001.

Instructor(s): Anatole Senkevitch (senkanat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 102. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/arch/543/001.nsf

The course offers a critical examination of the transformations in architectural theory and practice from the late 19th through the 20th century, with emphasis on elucidating the leadership struggles for definition, meaning, and form in the architecture of this period. Also considered is the link between theory and practice; the relationship between conceptual and aesthetic as well as technical factors; and the cultural, economic, social, and political context out of which they evolved.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 481 / CLARCH 481. Art of Ancient Iran.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret C Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the visual arts of ancient Iran from late prehistory to the Islamic conquest. It offers a broad overview of Iranian cultural heritage including its relations to the larger world within its orbits of interaction. The special goal of the course will be to place seals and other portable luxury arts in a charged analytical dialogue with programmatic visions of cult and kingship that were played out on the extraordinary tradition of rock carvings that inflect the natural landscape of Iran and the complexly nuanced messages of its royally-commissioned palatial environments.

HISTART 481 is a slide-lecture course that also features in-class discussion of readings and group work around artifacts in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology.

There will be two in-class quizes; One term paper submitted in two stages as a project proposal and as a full-fledged original research endeavor of about 15 pages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 001 Gender and Viewing. [3 credits]. Meets with WS 483.002.

Instructor(s): Susan Siegfried (seigfrie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We take it for granted today that viewing is gendered. The theories for analysing this gendering in the visual arts were pioneered by feminist film theory and literary criticism, as well as psychoanalysis. The course will study those models and their elaboration in feminist critiques of the visual arts. It will also attend to the historical question they raise, of how present-day theories of gender can be enlisted in the study of earlier art. Drawing on material from the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries, we will examine the dynamics of gender in relation to the thematics of viewing and the social spaces of exhibition. The topics considered include the importance of female subjectivity in the production and consumption of paintings, the capacity of a work of art to gender the spectator's position, and the gendering of fantasies provoked by works of art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 002 Issues in Modern Sculpture and Theory. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Alexander Potts (adpotts@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sculpture has been an important focus of discussion about the nature of visual art throughout the modern period. It is the purpose of this course to examine these debates as well as several of the key works which provoked them. In a sculpture, even where it is a structure or environment rather than an object, materiality counts for a lot. A sculpture is difficult to conceive of simply as an image, even though some of the more idealist theories of art, from the Neo-Classicism of the late eighteenth century to the conceptualism of the late twentieth century, have tried to do this. We shall be exploring changing attitudes to the tension that works of sculpture highlight between the image-like quality of works of art and their brute materiality.

A sculpture is art, but also a bit of the everyday world. As such, works of sculpture are locked into that process of modern consumerism whereby actual things in the world are endowed with immaterial value. Sculptures are useless things, but also things that take up space, that a viewer can wander around and even, in theory, through rarely in practice, actually touch. However, as soon as we envision sculptures as works of art, they are no less unreal than paintings, no less caught up in fantasies, beliefs, and ideology. We shall be concerned then with the history of an ever more rampant consumerism and the efforts artists and their audience have made to envision symbolically charged things that would not immediately be appropriated as consumer commodities.

Publicness, the idea of art as monument, has been an important feature of the multiple destinies of sculpture over the past two centuries sculpture being closely bound up with modern conceptions of public space and public value. Public sculptures are like useless bits of architecture. Yet they are also interventions in space that, however abstract, present themselves as having a public significance even Oldenburg's incongruously giant clothespeg or Serra's blackened steel walls or Henry Moore's biomorphic blobs. Modern culture celebrates endless change, to the point that "all that is solid melts into air," and yet it also hankers after permanence and monumentality. Sculpture, particularly public sculpture, is there, right at the centre of this split an at times uncomfortable, at times reassuring presence, both throw-away gesture and stable thing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 003 Labcoats in the Studio: Flying Cars, Flying buildings, and Mid-Century American Architecture. [3 credits]. Meets with Architecture 409.103.

Instructor(s): Kent Kleinman (kleinman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"It may well be that we hitherto understood as architecture and what we are beginning to understand of technology are incompatible disciplines."

P.R. Banham, Thaory and Design in the First Machine Age

Near the end of Banham's scathing review of European modernism, he observed that in many ways the architects of the machine age had, in effect, missed the boat (or rather the car). Corbusier was busily praising Ford for the perfection of an object type at pretty much the same time that Ford, unable to retool his production lines, was losing market share to the more nimble GM; Gropius, Loos and others were busily designing handsome but completely anachronistic automobiles while Americans Fuller and Bel Geddes were proposing radical teardrop shaped rear engine transportation machines and mechanical houses. As architects were proposing carefully configured icons of the machine age in Europe, Americans were coming to terms with the fact that the common ground between mass production and design was fabricating consumer desire rather than timeless artifacts.

The American technological and economic context during the period between the wars fostered a particular design sensibility and agenda that profoundly affected American architecture and design. Not surprisingly, given the proximity to the automobile industry, much innovative and inventive work emerged from the Midwest, in particular Michigan, where a model of design practice "geared" to industrial modes found root that attempted to address and redress the increasingly divergent trajectories of design and technology observed by Banham.

This seminar will be structured in two parts. Part I will map the American technological and cultural design context leading up to WWII. Readings will include selections from Lewis Mumford, Terry Smith, Aldous Huxley, Norman Bel Gedded, Reynor Banham, Jeffrey Meikle, and others. We will study the extraordinary designs of Geddes and Fuller, the arguably unspectacular, albeit critically important, designs of Kahnm, the artwork of Charles Sheeler, and the marketing and product design of Ford and Sloan (General Motors).

Part II will involve research into the work of select Michigan-based architects such as Albert Kahn, George Brigham, C.W. Lane, T. Larson, W. Oberdick and E. Saarinen. This part will involve direct use of primarily materials held in area archives, in particular the Bentley Historical Archives. Students will be expected to produce a research paper on a relevant subject of their choice using primary materials from the archive.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 004 Becoming Modern Architecture: An American [Case] Study. [3 credits]. Meets with Architecture 409.102.

Instructor(s): Kent Kleinman

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Modern Architecture came to the United States in waves: In the early twenties, the Chicago Tribune Tower Competition not only introduced Saarinen's prototypical solution for the tall building but also didactic proposals of Europeans Hilbersheimer, Gropius and (even) Loos to an astonished American design community. In the mid twenties, the influence of the Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Moderne fueled the Art Deco movement and six years of exuberant building in New York City. In the early thirties, the Museum of Modern Art introduced four European "masters" and launched the Americanized version of modernism known since as the "International Style." By the end of the forties, émigrés Mies in Chicago and Gropius at Harvard were revamping the education of future American architects.

The introduction of architectural modernism to the United States and its transformation in a new social and economic context will be the subject of this seminar. Topics will include: The "telephone" game: early traffic in ideas from America to Europe and back again; the "other" modern: the 1925 Paris Exposition and the Art Deco movement in NYC; White-washed modernity: the Museum of Modern Art and the agenda of the "Modern Architecture: International Exhibition" show of 1932; The founding of the Museum of Non-objective Art (later the Guggenheim Museum); The Bauhaus spirit and the revolution in the American academy.

We will approach the evolution of American modernism from two distinct perspectives. The first part of the academic term will involve a broad review via secondary sources of the ideas, institutions, and individuals that shaped the reception and transformation of European architectural modernism in this country. The second part will take advantage of a unique opportunity to study this subject through the work of a single individual using primary sources (archived drawings, papers, and photographs) held at the University of Michigan's Bentley archive. Architect William Muschenheim (1902-1989) was influenced by, and contributed to, each of the topic areas listed above. Mucshenheim was a star student of the great German proto-modernist Peter Behrens. He worked with the theatrical Joseph Urban and the Art Deco master Ely Kahn in New York, participated in the "rejected architects" exhibition supported by Johnson of MoMA, was the architect of the first Guggenheim Gallery in New York, was an ardent supporter of educational reform in American schools of Architecture (and UM in particular), and built extraordinary projects (over 190!) exploring new materials and methods. The goal of this two-pronged approach will be to understand the general context in which modern architecture evolved in the United States and then to particularize this narrative with the work of one of its leading practitioners.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Martin Powers (mpow@umich.edu), Sussan Babaie (sbabaie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the wake of September 11, there is an urgent need to better understand just how interconnected are the peoples of Europe, Asia and the Middle East. In contrast to the tradition of nation-bounded historiography, this course explores what happens "when strangers meet." The problematic of cultural encounter is especially poignant in the history of art, which has long been allied to the rhetoric of nationalism. This course takes as its premise the polyvalency of cultural production and dialogue, and the fluidity of artistic movements across imaginary lines between "East" and "West." Utilizing specific instances of the partnership of politics, commerce and culture, the course navigates a range of options for understanding how peoples in one geographic region visualize themselves vis-à-vis others.

This course explores the interconnectedness of cultures across Eurasia through the prisms of visual culture and social practice. It questions historical assumptions about internally self-sufficient cultures, whether "Western" or "Asian." By focusing on transcultural practices, students will become familiar with alternatives to historically prominent paradigms of influence, cultural superiority, or colonial victimization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of instructor.

HISTART 584. Painting in Islamic Countries.

Section 001 Mughla India and the Coalescence of Visual Cultures.

Instructor(s): Sussan Babaie (sbabaie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 285. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From Rembrandt in the 17th century to Howard Hodgkin in the 20th, Mughal painting has inspired and enchanted artists, collectors, and scholars with its extraordinary pictorial richness and originality. This seminar seeks to understand the historical and social circumstances of the production and consumption of Mughal painting through close analysis of illustrated manuscripts, album pages, and primary source material. Students will explore the particularities of the visual idioms (Persian, Indic, European) that coalesced into this innovative representational language. Emphasis will be on artists and royal patrons, workshop and training practices, reception and aesthetic "grading," and rhetorical and ideological constructions that constituted the visual culture of Mughal India. Several recent exhibitions and seminal publications on Mughal painting enriched by retranslated or freshly translated royal memoirs, chronicles, and travel accounts make this an opportune moment to investigate the formation and trajectory of the Mughal style of painting. Active participation in class discussions, weekly readings and précis of assigned texts, two oral presentations, and a research paper constitute the grade. Visits to museums both near and far will be arranged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 600. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of graduate advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department of the History of Art faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3; permission of instructor only

HISTART 655. Studies in the History of the History of Art.

Section 001 Art History in the 1920s and 1930s.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth L Sears (esears@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The period between the two world wars saw remarkable developments in the discipline of art history. Figures of great intellectual stature Aby Warburg, Erwin Panofsky, Edgar Wind, Heinrich Wölfflin, Otto Pächt, Henri Focillon, Meyer Schapiro, and many others turned to the study of art. Writings they produced in this era, deemed classics in the field, are essential reading for art historians of any stripe, for these thinkers used their scholarly investigations to approach big issues: art for them was an index of a cultural change, a key to the discovery of deeper historical patterns. This seminar is conceived as an extended rumination on art historical method. We will read representative works by key figures, as well as important historiographical studies about their work, and seek to situate their thinking historically. It will be our purpose to reconstruct the settings of the vibrant intellectual exchange that characterized the period, to identify the large collaborative projects that gave shape to individual efforts, to follow the displacements of individuals resulting from the rise of Nazism, and to trace the consequences of the (forced) emigration for art historical and cultural historical study in Britain and America. Themes to be considered include the response of art historians to contemporary modernist trends in art making/art theory, and artistic response to the historical material that scholarship made available.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 666. Problems in 17th Century Art and Visual Culture.

Section 001 Picturing Art and Culture in Dutch Genre Painting.

Instructor(s): Celeste A Brusati (cbrusati@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores the discourse on art that emerged in the work of Johannes Vermeer and his contemporaries. The course will focus on the ways in which Vermeer's small corpus of pictures (roughly 34 paintings) distills and comments retrospectively on crucial aspects of Dutch art and visual culture. We will consider Vermeer's pictures first as part of a rich nexus of pictorial and textual commentaries on art produced by other native informants, including Samuel van Hoogstraten, Gerrit Dou, Gerard Ter Borch, and others. We will then explore how this vernacular discourse on art has been and might be brought to bear on recent efforts to theorize descriptive artistry and to understand the role of pictures in producing Dutch culture. Topics include the making, marketing, and viewing of Dutch art, the intersecting concerns of painting and optics, experimental inquiry, emblems, picturing domesticity, the poetics of seeing, and critiques of realism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 677. Studies in American Art.

Section 001 Realism and Realities. Meets with American Culture 699.005.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An informed understanding of how representation works is a building-block of any artistic or cultural analysis. This seminar interrogates the idea of "American Realism" by examining both realism and representation as rhetorical, power-laden practices. Ranging across fiction, documentary, and art, we will test the insights of literary and photographic theories of representation (Barthes, Lukacs, Tagg, etc.) on works that have made competing claims to represent American realities. After a comparative look at issues of representation and illusion in Netherlandish art, our study will begin with the rise of bourgeois reportage and the penny press in the early nineteenth century and conclude with Brecht's modernist challenge to the ideals of mimetic representation and narration in light of American culture of the 1930s. Along the way we will read some defining literary icons (including Dickens and Flaubert as well as Twain, James, Howells, and Agee) and reinterpret the art of Eakins, Riis, photographic and painterly depictions of Native Americans, the American Trompe-l'oeil painters, Sojourner Truth's self-representations, and thirties documentary.

Students will then apply the insights gained through readings and class discussion to research projects in their own fields of interest. The course will include a field trip to the exhibition "Deceptions and Illusions" at the National Gallery in Washington. Students from Comparative Literature, English, Film/Video, History, Art, and Architecture in addition to History of Art and American Culture are encouraged to participate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 694. Special Studies in the Art of China.

Section 001 Art and Society in Medieval Dunhuang.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (qning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the roles of religious practice, secular patronage, political propaganda, and historical memory in shaping medieval Chinese art. Focusing on the Dunhuang Caves and the silk and paper paintings discovered in the "library cave", this course aims to explore the issues concerning the visual form of power, interplay of ritual painting and ritual practice, gender transformation and women, fantasy and reality in painting of paradise, and the relationship between literary and pictorial descriptions. Special attention will be given to the new approaches and methods in studying Buddhist art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 700. Independent Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Approval of graduate advisor. Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for individualized student non-thesis research under under the supervision of History of Art faculty. Must be arranged with the faculty member and approved by the program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor only

HISTART 771. Problems in Art of the Nineteenth Century.

Section 001 Image, Ideology, Opposition: Form and Signification in Parisian Art and Culture, 1848-1894.

Instructor(s): Howard G Lay (hglay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is concerned with the development of strategies for interpretive readings of pictures within a specific historical context. The context is Paris during the second half of the nineteenth century; the visual materials include painting (Courbet, Manet, Degas, Seurat, Lautrec, Rousseau, et al.), caricature, political cartoons, photography, and publicity posters; the strategies are derived from art history, narratology, history, and a broad range of methods that loosely coalesce under the rubric "critical theory." The course is designed to assess recent theorizations of Modernism in relation to a wide variety of Parisian cultural phenomena from the somewhat narrow interests of professional artists, writers, and critics, to the broader consequences of industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of mass culture. It is also designed to encourage new methods of interpretation in order to account for the reconfiguration characteristic of Modernist painting of conventional relations between artist and spectator, between literal and figurative order of signification, between the presumed formal indices of authoriality and their performance as pictorial traces of a "constructed" authorial subject.

Requirements for the course are: an oral presentation (@20 minutes) and a research paper (@20 pages).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 773. Problems in Art of the Twentieth Century.

Section 001 El Lissitzky, from Suprematist to Stalinist.

Instructor(s): Maria Gough (mgough@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An exploration of the multi-faceted work of El Lissitzky (1890-1941), an exhibition designer, stage designer, book designer, typographer, photographer, photomonteur, painter, lithographer, illustrator, architect, and writer, who was perhaps the most influential and certainly the most mercurial member of the Russian and Soviet avant-garde. Timed to coincide with the January 2003 reopening of the world's largest collection of Lissitzky's work outside of Russia that of the Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum in The Netherlands the seminar will follow the trajectory of Lissitzky's international career, from the Jewish Renaissance through Malevich's Suprematism, German Dadaism, International Constructivism, the task of Soviet reconstruction, and, finally, Stalinism.

Particular attention will be given to the following problems:

  1. Lissitzky's mediation of Constructivism's various and contradictory positions in western Europe where he lived between 1921-1925;
  2. his invention after 1925 of new intermedia practices such as monumental or architectural photography; and
  3. his development of, and contribution to, Stalinist aesthetic practices in Moscow in the early 1930s.

The seminar will read many of the new publications on the Russian and Soviet avant-garde that have appeared over the course of the last decade or so, as well as draw upon, where possible, the extraordinary archival collections of Lissitzky and other Russian modernists recently acquired by the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles. Students will write one research paper. This course is open to graduate students in all disciplines.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 855 / CLARCH 855. Problems in Roman Archaeology.

Section 001 The Forum and the Roman City.

Instructor(s): Michael L Thomas

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 855.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTART 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for HISTART.


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