College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Institute for the Humanities


This page was created at 8:13 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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INSTHUM 511. Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies.

Section 001 Cultural Legitimations of Premodern Elites. [3 Credits]. Meets with ACABS 592.001.

Instructor(s): Piotr A Michalowski (piotrm@umich.edu), John R Baines

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/insthum/511/001.nsf

Elites in all civilizations exploit complex cultural means to establish, enact, and reinforce their internal positions and to communicate with other societies outside. To do this they often directly control and manipulate communicative channels, public display, and access to historical memory. Many domains of legitimation leave permanent material imprints that constitute the major legacies of these cultures for modern scholarship. Other, often equally important domains are more difficult to recover because they were registered on perishable materials or because they were vested primarily in action and movement rather than in artifacts. Many styles of elite legitmation constitute what are now called "art forms." Rulers and elites work together to sustain legitimacy, but its domains are also arenas of competition and dissent. In principle elites often address their legitimation strategies to a broad public, but in reality the forms in which they are cast generally relate to the elites themselves and hardly to wider groups.

This seminar treats elite legitimations of premodern societies from a comparative perspective. The organizers, who are specialists in ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt, welcome participation from students of other civilizations, principally before about 1600 ce. The intention is to use case studies to explore the legitimizing character of a broad range of artistic modes, be they verbal, visual, or performed, and to analyze the function of vehicles such as writing that are essential to the organization of complex societies but are often viewed from an overly pragmatic point of view. Domains that are suitable for case studies include historiography and literary texts, religious buildings and uses of plastic and pictorial art, or complex institutions such as the hunt, as well as the manipulation of the landscape as cultural statement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

INSTHUM 511. Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies.

Section 002 Motion in Sound. [3 Credits]. Meets with Composition 506.

Instructor(s): Evan K Chambers

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This interdisciplinary seminar will examine our thinking about the deep and often overlooked connections between movement, metaphor, and sound. Throughout the course, we will reconsider sound in music and language as it relates to our bodies, to movement, and to the human effort of its creation. The course will take a look at the ways in which movement is encoded into sound (and vice versa) in music, dance, poetry, song, and speech.

The first half of the course will consist of readings from a variety of fields (philosophy, music, criticism, etc.) with class discussion of individual works of music, poetry, performance, and dance; it will culminate in the writing of a brief manifesto or position paper. The second half of the term will consist of a self-directed artistic, musical, or scholarly project that may be collaborative. This will be presented to the class in a final presentation, exhibition, or performance. Students of all disciplines and all thoughtful people are invited to enroll, including but not limited to: writers, dancers, musicians, artists, performers, scholars of literature, scientists, artists, biologists, kinesiologists, as well as students of social work, psychology, and natural resources.

No prerequisites. Undergraduate and graduate students welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

INSTHUM 713. Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies.

Section 001 Histories of Homosexuality. Meets with Women's Studies 702.001.

Instructor(s): David M Halperin, Valerie J Traub

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Lesbian and gay identity is, as historians have come to recognize, a largely post-Enlightenment phenomenon. How does one then write the history of homosexuality? In their daily practice, scholars inevitably confront the tension between their respect for the alterity of the past and their commitments to the political and cultural needs of the present. Rather than attempt a chronological survey in this seminar, we hope to open up the project of writing histories of homosexuality beyond the disciplinarity of history itself. Given the many possible ways of approaching the historicity of homosexuality (identification, disidentification, desire, appropriation, projection, revision, among others), the seminar will be organized around a series of questions, issues, topics, and problems that have informed recent scholarship. Moving back and forth between historiographic, theoretical, and political issues, on the one hand, and pre-modern, early modern, and modern archives of sexuality, on the other, students will gain a more precise knowledge both of erotic experience in the past and the methods by which it is apprehended and imagined. Our hope is to move scholarship beyond homophobic denial and gay affirmation to achieve a richer appreciation of the queerness of history, past and present.

Enrollment by permission of instructors; contact halperin@umich.edu or traubv@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Contact halperin@umich.edu or traubv@umich.edu.


Undergraduate Course Listings for INSTHUM.


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