College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Linguistics


This page was created at 8:14 PM on Wed, Feb 5, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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LING 406 / ENGLISH 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 406.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

LING 408 / ENGLISH 408. Varieties of English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 408.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

LING 429. Discourse Analysis and Language Teaching.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Malcolm Swales (jmswales@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 313, 316, or 315. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What are the connections between language, linguistics, and language teaching materials? In particular, how can the recent advances in discourse analysis and corpus linguistics be built into tasks and exercises? This practical course is designed to give participants training in the processes of collecting authentic language data, analyzing that data, and converting it into appropriate pedagogical formats.

Although the main focus of illustration will be ESL, every effort will be made to accommodate other interests. There will be one or two guest speakers, and use will be made of the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English (MICASE).

The course text is Guy Cook "Discourse Analysis", available at Shaman Drum. Other materials will be on reserve at the Linguistics/ELI Library.

Assessed work will consist of a number of shorter exercises and a final major project (group or individual). Graduate students will also produce a short academic paper.

Toward the end of the academic term, we will round off the course with a mini-conference in the English Language Institute, where the final projects will reappear in either presentation or poster format!

Inquiries to jmswales@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 461 / ANTHRCUL 461 / AMCULT 461. Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/461/001.nsf

See Cultural Anthropology 461.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 009 Interdisciplinary Approaches: Language and Mind. Meets with Ling 792.009 & Psych 808.006.

Instructor(s): Julie E Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 505. Rhetoric.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey G Heath (jheath@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; qualitified undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course's objective is to understand how "rhetors" such as political leaders use language and imagery to impress, influence, and persuade a general public. Primary objects of analysis are speeches and debates. We show how successful rhetorical events tap into collective memories of prior events (literary and historical). We begin with the ancient world (the Iliad, Cicero), jump to Shakespeare and Milton, then consider a chronological sequence of American speeches from Washington to the present. Orations by Lincoln and M. L. King Jr. are closely studied in cultural and political context. Debates from Lincoln-Douglas to Gore-Perot are then analysed. Satire and standup comedy are briefly considered as rhetorical forms. Theoretical readings include treatises of Aristotle and Cicero, along with modern writers such as Robert Hariman ("Political Styles") and Kenneth Burke. However, the emphasis is on open-ended textual analysis rather than on philosophical reflection. Open to undergraduates with instructor's permission.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 510. Computer Programming for Linguistics and Language Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven Abney (abney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for linguists and others in humanities and social sciences with interest in the computational study of language, this course provides essential programming skills for language processing, including corpus procession (sociolinguistics, language preservation, authorship studies), and computational modeling of parsing (psycholinguistics, computational linguistics). Students electing this course are well prepared for LING 541.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 513. Phonology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): San Duanmu (duanmu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 313. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/ling/513/001.nsf

Phonology studies the sound system of human languages. This course introduces the fundamental concepts in phonology. Topics include distinctive features, phonological rules, prosodic structure (syllable, stress, tone, intonation), multi-tiered phonology, feature geometry, underspecification, and Optimality Theory. Both theory and problem-solving ability will be emphasized. Besides readings for class, weekly exercises constitute an important part of the course. In addition, there is a final project on a selected topic.

Prerequisite: LING 313 or 512, or permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 514. Semantics and Pragmatics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter J Hallman (hallman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 316. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces four tools for semantic analysis, their relation to current issues in semantic theory, and their relation to an overall picture of what meaning is and how it is encoded in natural language. The four tools are: (intensional) predicate and propositional logic, discourse representation theory, situation theory, and generalized quantifier theory. These tools are couched in the truth-functional approach to what meaning is, according to which language is basically classificational linguistic expressions (words, predicates, sentences) serve to classify reality into what is the case and what isn't the case. With these tools, we will explore current issues in semantics relating to the syntax-semantics interface, quantification, scope and anaphora, information packaging and the various ways in which meaning and context interact.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 518. Linguistic Typology.

Section 001 Meets with Linguistics 318.001.

Instructor(s): Peter E Hook (pehook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; undergraduates with permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in LING 318. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~pehook/lingw97.html

Human languages, especially those spoken by members of unfamiliar and distant cultures, appear on the surface to be very different from one another. But closer examination reveals that languages differ in systematic ways and that more than half of them can be divided into a relatively small number of basic types. In this course we will identify and study some of these basic patterns and explore possible reasons for their existence, seeking explanations where possible in the communicative function of language as well as in the historical evolution of languages.

The course will introduce students to basic grammatical structure and function by (1) having them investigate unfamiliar languages through study of published descriptive grammars and (2) relating this direct experience to the principle findings of contemporary typological research.

Coursework will consist of:

  1. readings and lectures on the major categories and parameters which are used to define language types,
  2. the completion of a number of short assignments or reports on given phenomena as they are manifested in the languages that students will adopt,
  3. discussion and comparison of these individual findings in class,
  4. a midterm exam, and
  5. a course paper examining a particular typological parameter in one or more languages.

Toward the end of the course students will make a ten minute oral presentation to the class of a pre-final version of their term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 519. Discourse Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Deborah Keller-Cohen (dkc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/ling/519/001.nsf

This course offers a graduate level introduction to the analysis of discourse, both spoken and written. Major approaches to the analysis of texts will be examined both for their historical underpinnings as well as their major assumptions. Although it has no prerequisites, it is desirable for students to have some prior knowledge of the language of linguistics. Because this is a seminar format, a high level of student participation is expected. Course assignments include regular conversation papers, analysis of some data sets, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 547 / PSYCH 547. Experimental Methods in Language Processing Research.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie E Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 547.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

LING 551. Second Language Acquisition.

Section 001 Meets with Linguistic 351.001.

Instructor(s): Judy A Dyer (jdyer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/ling/351/001.nsf

This introductory course will focus on theories of second language acquisition and how they relate to second language development and teaching. The course will cover some of the major topics within second language acquisition research and will provide students with experience in data analysis and interpretation. While much of the literature focuses on the acquisition of English, examples and analysis of other language data will be discussed. The course is intended for all students interested in understanding and evaluating proposed models of second language acquisition.

Undergraduates should register for LING 351 and graduates for LING 551. Both courses will meet together with additional work for LING 551 credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 615. Advanced Syntax.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Samuel D Epstein (sepstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 515 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A second term graduate-level course in Syntactic theory. The intent is to move beyond the introductory-text level, begin reading primary literature critically, undertake research, and extend knowledge of the Government-Binding theory sufficient to initiate an informed preliminary investigation of the motivations for and overall design features of the Minimalist Program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 002 Text-to-Speech Synthesis. Prerequisite: knowledge of linguistics or a programming language. [3 Credits]. Meets with Linguistics 492.001.

Instructor(s): San Duanmu (duanmu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/ling/792/002.nsf

This course introduces basic techniques in text-to-speech synthesis. We will use the di-phone approach and the PSOLA technique, with a focus on the implementation of prosody and hands-on skills.

Prerequisite: Some knowledge of phonetics and phonology, and some knowledge of (or willingness to learn) programming.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 005 Language & Socialization. [3 Credits]. Meets with Anthro 458.002, Psych 551.244, Psych 457.001, Ling 492.005.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek, Marilyn J Shatz

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 458.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 006 Tense and Time. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Peter Ludlow (ludlow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Philosophy 550.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 008 Qualifying Research Paper Writing Course. [Credits?]

Instructor(s): Beddor

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 009 Interdisciplinary Approaches: Language and Mind. [2 credits]. Meets with Ling 492.009 & Psych 808.006

Instructor(s): Julie E Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 801. Seminar on Graduate Study.

Section 001 History of the Modern Field of Linguistics. [1 credit].

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar has three goals. The first is to introduce students to the history of the modern field of linguistics. In the Fall Term we will focus on readings and discussions that will take us from 19th-century linguistics through the Chomskyan revolution of the 1960s. In the Winter Term we will concentrate on the past 30 years of (mostly American) linguistics. The second goal is to begin to develop an understanding of the diverse approaches to the study of linguistics and an appreciation for the relations among these different approaches. Thus the course also serves as a forum where students can discuss how the various aspects of their coursework fit together. These two goals converge in helping us to build an integrated view of the discipline. The third goal is specific to the first-year students in the Department of Linguistics: the seminar will orient these students to graduate study in linguistics in the Department, and at the university, and to consider first-year students' long-term goals relative to the course of study they are embarking on. Throughout the year, many of our discussions will be led by linguistics faculty with expertise in specific topics to be covered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 812. Seminar: Phonetics.

Section 001 Experimental Speech Perception.

Instructor(s): Patrice Speeter Beddor (beddor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Previous course in phonetics. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Experimental speech perception, which spans a period of some 50 years, investigates how listeners extract a linguistic message from the input acoustic signal. From the field's earliest years, researchers recognized that the acoustic signal is highly variable, and that the extraction process is not a simple one-to-one mapping between acoustic property and linguistic percept. Thus, much of the research in speech perception has been guided by the fundamental question: How do listeners "cope" with acoustic variability? Attempts to relate the non-discrete, variable acoustic signal with more discrete, invariant percepts has led to the development of several competing theories of speech perception. While aspects of these theories (some would say, theoretical approaches) are not empirically testable, they have the advantage of being grounded in relatively simple assumptions about perception. These assumptions, in turn, have motivated further questions, including:

  • What is the relation of speech perception to production?
  • What are the units of speech perception?
  • Can we identify invariants in auditory (as opposed to acoustic) representations?
  • What is the role of auditory processing in speech perception, and can we identify which perceptual processes are purely auditory and which are speech-specific?
  • How do non-human animals perceive speech?
  • How do infants perceive speech and what are the developmental stages of perceptual reorganization?
  • What are the influences of experience with a particular phonological system on speech perception?
  • What are the influences of perception on phonological systems?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 817(802). Seminar: Historical Linguistics.

Section 001 Current problems and controversies in historical linguistics.

Instructor(s): William H Baxter III (wbaxter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 517. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/ling/817/001.nsf

This seminar will examine current problems and controversies in historical linguistics, and seek methods for resolving them. The threat that many human languages will become extinct in the next few generations adds urgency to these issues; much of the information required to reconstruct linguistic history may be lost. (I take it for granted that the facts of human language history are worth studying, not only for what they reveal about the human language faculty, but also for what they reveal about the history of human societies.).

We will focus on the following questions:

  • Can and should the traditional toolkit of historical linguistics be improved and updated?
  • What is the relevance of historical linguistics to linguistic theory, and vice versa?
  • Is it realistic to group languages according to a genetic family-tree model? To what extent do linguistic variation and language contact complicate this task?
  • Is it useful to try to identify more ancient language families than those currently recognized (e.g. Nostratic, Dene-Caucasian, Amerind), and if so, how can such hypotheses be evaluated empirically?
  • Can linguistic history be combined with the findings of genetics and archaeology to clarify human prehistory, and if so, how?

Seminar participants will be expected to make regular written and oral contributions to the seminar, and to prepare a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 997. Special Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a graduate-level independent research course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


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