College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Political Science


This page was created at 8:39 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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POLSCI 409. Twentieth Century Political Thought.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Manuel

Prerequisites: POLSCI 101 or 302. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vincent L Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One course in political science. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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POLSCI 488. Political Dynamics.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher H Achen (achen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing; one prior course in political science is recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/488/001.nsf

Will a single presidential candidate emerge from the primaries or will we have a brokered convention? Do arms races lead to war? Why do popular movements get started, grow, and then often subside without accomplishing their goals? Is the earth growing warmer and what should be done about it politically? Questions of this kind are not easily answered with unaided intuition. Social systems grow organically, and their parts interact in different ways at different times.

Feedback loops cause many reforms to have the opposite of the intended effect. The purpose of this course is to bring systems thinking to bear on political dynamics. A few simple but powerful mathematical ideas will be taught and applied to a variety of political issues. Students will learn to experiment with dynamics and forecasting on personal computers, using primarily graphical methods. The course is meant to be experimental and applied rather than theoretical. A prerequisite of one prior course in political science is suggested.

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POLSCI 500. First Year Colloquium.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edie Goldenberg

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended to provide graduate students interested in academic careers with an introduction to our profession. We will alternate between sessions with invited members of our department that focus on major subfields (e.g., political theory, world politics, comparative politics, etc.) and sessions that focus on topics often untouched in traditional graduate programs (e.g., faculty roles, ethics, governance, etc.). This course is highly recommended for first-year PhD students but is also suitable for others who anticipate faculty careers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor.

POLSCI 585 / PUBPOL 585. Political Environment of Policy Analysis.

Public Policy

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Van Houweling

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/585/001.nsf

See Public Policy 585.001.

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POLSCI 603. Modern Political Thought.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mika Tapani Lavaque-Manty (mmanty@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/603/001.nsf

This seminar is a chronological survey of early modern and modern political thought. The seminar will cover Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche and will include additional contemporary writings as well as secondary literature.

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POLSCI 619 / CAAS 519. African Americans and the Politics of Race.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vincent Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 619.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 635. Proseminar in Public Administration and Public Policy.

Public Policy

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ann Chih Lin (annlin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/635/001.nsf

In political science, public policy is often seen as a byproduct of the political process. But public policy can also be thought of as a set of resources for the creation of politics. In this model, policy as created by lawmakers is but a starting point for revision, reinterpretation, and (often uneven) application. This course will investigate the politics of public policy by looking at how how institutional and intergovernmental coordination, bureaucracy and bureaucratic culture, and interactions with the judiciary, with citizens, and with the market affect the implementation and administration of policies. Students will write several research memos over the term, and develop a research design or review article for the final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 638 / PUBPOL 638. Field Training.

Public Policy

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marina V N Whitman

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/pubpol/638/001.nsf

See Public Policy 638.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 644. Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman IV (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A proseminar primarily concerned with analyzing the prospects for democratic and /or market transformations in post-Soviet Russia emphasizing the impact of change and continuity in Soviet and post-Soviet political culture and institutions. Students will be strongly encouraged to utilize mass and elite data sets in Zimmerman's possession in writing their term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 655. Proseminar in Japanese Politics.

Comparative

Section 001 Japan from the Viewpoint of Comparative Politics.

Instructor(s): John C Campbell

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. No prior knowledge of Japan is assumed. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Provides an overview of Japanese political behavior, processes and institutions; focuses on such areas as the government role in the economy, the alleged immobilism of decision-making, cultural vs. both institutional and rational-choice explanations of political phenomena, how Japan fits into the development of welfare states, and conflict-management in U.S.-Japan relations.

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POLSCI 668. War in World Politics.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul Huth (phuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/668/001.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 677. Proseminar in Southeast Asian Politics.

World

Section 001 Politics and Political Economy of Southeast Asia.

Instructor(s): Allen D Hicken (ahicken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/677/001.nsf

This course looks at the politics and political economy of Southeast Asia focusing on seven countries: Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. The course also looks at comparative themes such as economic development, democratization, governance, and regional cooperation.

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POLSCI 681. Proseminar in Empirical Theory and Method.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arthur Lupia (lupia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/681/001.nsf

This course provides skills sufficient for reading most formal theoretic research in political science. At the outset, we discuss the role of logical reasoning in scientific argument. We then explore the structural and substantive foundations of cooperative and non-cooperative game theory. We conclude by surveying recent applications. Grades are based on a series or problem sets, class presentations and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 683. Proseminar in Parties and Group Political Behavior.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert W Mickey (rmickey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/683/001.nsf

This course explores traditional and cutting-edge research on political parties. While emphasizing American politics, a substantial portion of readings and topics in the course are drawn from comparative politics. The course is designed to assist graduate students in developing or furthering their research projects as these involve parties and political competition.

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POLSCI 684. Comparative Democratic Process.

Comparative

Section 001 Comparative Democratic Institutions.

Instructor(s): Christophe Crombez

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. POLSCI 681and 699 are highly recommended, but not required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course studies a variety of aspects of parliamentary government. It analyzes institutions and their impact on politics and policies. The focus is primarily, but not exclusively, on European politics. We will study elections, parties, cabinet government, and legislative decision-making. The readings will include research papers that present mathematical models of democratic institutions and procedures. Therefore, I will assume that students have an understanding of the basic concepts of game theory. Students will be asked to present formal models and to develop their own models.

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POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 001 Gender, Race, & Politics.

Instructor(s): Nancy E Burns (nburns@umich.edu) , Donald R Kinder (drkinder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we build a bridge between the study of gender and the study of race. For conceptual tools, we will draw upon these two literatures within political science, and we will incorporate approaches to gender and race from history, philosophy, psychology, sociology. We take these two topics up together because the comparison between the two pushes us to see questions that have been asked in one field that have simply never come up in the other and allows us to borrow theoretical tools developed to understand one hierarchy to think about the other. We will draw heavily, but not exclusively, from the literatures on American politics, public opinion, and political action.

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POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 002 Asian Security Issues.

Instructor(s): Kenneth G Lieberthal

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/688/002.nsf

This seminar will examine recent developments and prospects regarding Asian security. The seminar will address the underlying forces that are shaping the overall security environment in Asia, the political frameworks through which security issues are filtered in each of the major countries, and pertinent resulting policy matters. It will take fully into account both American and Asian perspectives on these issues. A portion of the seminar meetings will feature guests who are or were key security players in the region. Students, therefore, will have an opportunity not only to study major security trends and issues but also, on some matters, to discuss these problems with people who hold or have held direct responsibility for dealing with them. The seminar is open to graduate students in LS&A and in the Ford School of Public Policy.

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POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 003 Politics of Industrial Sectors.

Instructor(s): Meredith Woo-Cumings (mwoc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 004 Governance: Experts & Advisors.

Instructor(s): Martin W Thunert

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Traditionally, government bureaucracies have been the primary source of public policy initiatives and recommendations, but today the growing challenges to governance more complex issues, the demands of civil society, and the changing nature of representative government, in particular have made nongovernmental external sources of policy advice increasingly important if not essential.

This course is both empirical and theoretical in orientation: it offers a comparative empirical cross-national assessment of the role of policy advice from such external sources as individual experts, scholars, and intellectuals, blue-ribbon commissions, think tanks, legislative support agencies, and research-oriented advocacy groups. Our theoretical investigation focuses on two questions; first, are some types of democratic political systems more open to external advice than others and what may be the reason for this; second, how do modern theories of democracy as well as theories of the policy-making process account for the role of these knowledged-based actors.

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POLSCI 694. Qualitative Research Methods.

Methods

Section 001 Proseminar in Qualitative Methods: Ann Arbor Reads.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/694/001.nsf

This proseminar is an introduction to the use of qualitative methods in political science with a particular focus on techniques. You will gain hands-on experience in participant observation, interviewing and the use of archival material. Analytical techniques, theory building and the written presentation of qualitative research will be discussed and practiced. In addition, we will consider ethics, epistemology and research design.

This course has been designed to teach a range of approaches to qualitative research including both positivist and interpretive work. Epistemological discussion is welcome, necessary and unavoidable. The course begins with a consideration of different epistemological approaches to research and you will be asked to think about these approaches throughout the course. You should not, however, consider our discussions to be a substitute for a full-fledged treatment of the philosophy of science.

There is a great deal to be covered in a short time in this course. As a result some topics will not be covered and no topic will be treated exhaustively. We do not cover techniques, such as content analysis, for the quantitative treatment of qualitative data. Students who are interested in these methods are encouraged to take the courses offered through the Survey Research Center at ISR. You also will not have the opportunity to develop dissertation proposals or other individual projects as part of the class assignments. Students who wish to do so might consider more advanced qualitative methods courses offered in this or other departments.

I expect and welcome students who are interested in qualitative methods in any subfield of political science or fields in other disciplines. While constraints of time and money prevent us from visiting other parts of the world to practice fieldwork techniques, many of the examples of qualitative work used in the course are drawn from subfields other than American Politics. I encourage you to discuss differences you perceive in the use of qualitative methods across subfields and disciplines, and to bring concerns about doing research in different settings to the class discussions.

Our research topic for this term will be Ann Arbor Reads. This is a community event sponsored by several local organizations that encourages all of the people living in Ann Arbor to read the same book and discuss it during a specific period of time. We will look at press coverage and other kinds of written, visual, or audio documents; conduct interviews and attend public events. The aim is not to produce comprehensive group or individual projects, but to allow the class to reference the same ideas and issues in their hands-on exploration of the class material.

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POLSCI 699. Statistical Methods in Political Research II.

Methods

Section 001 Introduction to the Quantitative Methodology of the Social Sciences.

Instructor(s): Christopher H Achen (achen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: POLSCI 599 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the quantitative methodology of the social sciences. A thorough introduction to linear-regression analysis is complemented by a more preliminary introduction to the analysis of non-linear functional relationships (especially those associated with binary dependent variables). Teaches students how to construct, estimate, and interpret empirical models which match their theoretical counterparts and maximize leverage from available data for the empirical evaluation of those theoretical propositions. Classic linear regression model, extensions thereof, specifications and data issues therein (such as omitted variables, multicolinearity, and multiplicative interactions), criticism of such models, and some introduction to time-series and binary-dependent-variable models.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 701. Selected Concepts in Political Theory.

Theory

Section 001 Modern Political Theorists.

Instructor(s): Andreas Kalyvas (akal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Modern political theorists have for the most part assumed the nation-state as their object of inquiry. Increasingly, however, this assumption is belied by such phenomena as migrations, diasporas, transnational economic processes, information flows, new development in international law, and transformations in warfare. As a result, many theorists today are reconsidering what precisely the unit of theorizing should be. This seminar examines political theories of imperialism, internationalism, cosmopolitanism, and the world-state as alternatives to the taken-for-granted presumption of the nation-state. Emphasis will be given on the issue of sovereign power and its presumed decline, the possibilities for representation, accountability, and the fate of democracy in a global order, the search for global justice, and theories of resistance against neo-liberal globalization that explore alternative paths. Selected readings include works by Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Hegel, Karl Marx and Vladimir Lenin, Hans Kelsen, Carl Schmitt, Jürgen Habermas, John Rawls, Paul Virilio, Danilo Zolo, Antonio Negri and Michael Hardt, and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 703. Selected Approaches to Political Theory.

Theory

Section 001 Cunning: Ration, Roles, Moral.

Instructor(s): Herzog

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 734 / PUBPOL 732 / EDUC 764. Public Policy in Postsecondary Education.

Public Policy

Section 001.

Instructor(s): DesJardins

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy 732.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 741. Seminar in Comparative Politics.

Comparative

Section 001 Post-Communism: Transformations from Communism in Comparative Perspective. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Mary E Gallagher

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3-6). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Since the 1980s socialist countries worldwide have been in the throes of rapid and often destabilizing transitions away from the planned economy and one party rule. There has been wide variation in the results of these transitions: some countries have moved quickly towards democratization and economic liberalization; others have languished in a state of institutional decay and partial reform; while China has maintained one party rule amid rapid economic growth and social change.

This seminar will examine these transformations from communism in comparative perspective. We will explore how the countries evolved under socialism, the breakdown of socialism in Eastern Europe and the USSR, and the differing paths used to reform their planned economies and authoritarian politics in the 1980s and 1990s. Due to the limited time we have for discussion, we will focus our analysis on specific issues that offer comparative insights on socialist transformation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 760. Research in World Politics.

World

Section 001 International Conflict.

Instructor(s): James D Morrow (jdmorrow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar covers the application of game-theoretic models to international politics. The object is to develop the ability to solve a range of such models and understand how they represent different problems in world politics. Each seminar will cover one paper in detail. Students will be expected to do brief weekly assignments and write a research paper using an original model. Completion or concurrent enrollment in POLSCI 681 is a prerequisite for the course.

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POLSCI 785. Seminar in Comparative Political Behavior.

Comparative

Section 001 Comparative Political Behavior.

Instructor(s): Ronald F Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu) , Ted Brader (tbrader@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/785/001.nsf

This seminar examines studies of political behavior beyond the United States, with particular attention to cross-national comparisons. Recent waves of democratization have made it possible to carry out empirical research on political behavior in a far wider range of countries than ever before. Comparative studies not only reveal how political behavior varies across contexts but also provide leverage on answering theoretical questions limited by single country studies. We will assess this work and identify avenues ripe for further exploration. Students are encouraged to use this an opportunity to develop, present, and receive feedback on a dissertation prospectus or chapter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 793. Methods Seminar.

Methods

Section 001 Complexity Theory in the Social Sciences. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Robert Axelrod (axe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~axe/complexity_syllabus.htm

Complexity theory is an interdisciplinary approach to understanding dynamic processes involving the interaction of many actors. This course focuses on agent-based modeling that is one of the primary methods of analyzing complex adaptive systems. Agent-based modeling involves specifying how individual agents (such as people, nations, or organizations) interact with each other and with their environment. Computer simulation is then used to discover the emergent properties of the model, and thereby gain insights into dynamic processes that would be too difficult to model with standard mathematical techniques.

The course will consider a wide variety of applications of agent-based models to the social sciences, including residential segregation, cultural change, social influence, war, alliances, nation formation, organizational change, elections, and markets. There will be four small exercises, and one major project selected by the student. Knowledge of a programming language is required. The course is intended for graduate students in a wide variety of fields, not just political science.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 795 / REES 795 / HISTORY 795 / ECON 795 / GEOG 795 / RUSSIAN 795. Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies.

Comparative

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 795.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 825 / HISTORY 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Comparative

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

POLSCI 892. Directed Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed research on a topic of the student's choice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

POLSCI 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for POLSCI.


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