College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Russian


This page was created at 8:40 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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RUSSIAN 402. Fourth-Year Russian.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vitalij V Shevoroshkin (vvs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 401. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 403. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continued work on vocabulary combined with the mastery of oral fluency and freedom of self-expression in speech and writing. Readings taken from Russian short stories and the press.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 474. Late 20th-Century Russian Literature.

Literature

Section 001 – Meets with Russian 856.001.

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/russian/474/001.nsf

Late Twentieth-Century Russian Literature surveys the work of major Russian authors in the last decades of the century. It examines the complex maps of a literature initially divided by ideology, place of production, and cultural orientation, and then re-integrated, but with major qualifications, by historical transformation. The re-making of Russian literature during and after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the emergence of new literary discourses and institutions in the 1990s, and the savage polemics about the nature and function of literature and of writers which have characterized that period will be among the major themes. Knowledge of Russian not required. This course may be used to fulfill one of the requirements for the undergraduate degree in Russian. Three hours per week, with informal lectures and discussion providing the teaching structure. Two papers and three in-class exams will be required of undergraduates, graduate students may write one long paper instead.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 479. Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years.

Literature

Section 001 – Meets with English 482.003.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Knowledge of Russian not required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course is the second part of the survey of Nabokov's life work. It will be devoted entirely to the American period of Nabokov's writing and cover his novels Bend Sinister, Lolita, Pnin, Pale Fire, Ada, Transparent Things, and Look at the Harlequins, as well as most of his English-language short stories and poems. Special attention will be paid to his activities as a translator, literary scholar, and educator. Students will be expected to read a wide selection of scholarly and critical works on Nabokov. Undergraduates concentrators in any field, including natural sciences, especially biology; graduate students of Slavic, English, Romance, German, and comparative literature, linguistics, and visual arts.

Three hours, lecture. Intensive reading; participation in class discussion; midterm report on secondary reading; final take-home examination or a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 482. Ten Masterpieces of Russian Literature.

Literature

Section 001 – Love Stories in Russian Short Stories.

Instructor(s): Boris Kats

Prerequisites: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An infinite variety of happy/unhappy lovers, multiform stages and nuances of male/female falling in love, the difference between the positions of men and women in love and marriage, attitudes of different generations toward love, conflicts, and rivalry in love triangles of many kinds as well as manifold emotions and situations provoked by love (from admiration to hatred, from awesome self-denying to fatal jealousy, from struggling with sexual temptations to plunging in reckless love adventures, etc.) - all this and more will be discussed as the life material for highly individual (serious or ironic) versions of sentimental, classical, romantic, realistic or pre(post)modernist short stories composed by famous Russian storytellers such as Karamzin, Pushkin, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekov, Bunin, and Nabokov. The stress will be made on certain artistic means by which Russian writers turned love stories into literary ones. Knowledge of Russian not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 499. Advanced Seminar in Russian.

Literature

Section 001 – Images of the "Provincial" in 19th- and 20th-Century Russian Culture.

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 302 or 303, and 351. Taught in Russian. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/russian/499/001.nsf

In Russia the "provinces" begin at the edges of Moscow and St Petersburg – everything beyond the two "capitals" is "provincial" in the world's largest country. Thus the vast majority of Russians live in the "provinces", although the country's culture (as its economy and politics) is dominated by the two capitals. The geographical extent of Russia, the inaccessibility of even major centers of population, a very centralized institutional structure, obvious economic imbalances, and many other factors go into sustaining the sense that "provincial" Russia is remote, backward, and homogeneous. At the same time, opposite claims are often heard: that here is the "real" Russia, uncontaminated by non-native influences, unchanged by time, pure, and beautiful – a model from which the capitals have deviated to their own detriment.

This course will examine a series of images of the "provincial" in nineteenth and twentieth-century Russian culture, using readings not only from fiction, poetry, and travel narratives, but also from beyond the realm of belles lettres (there will be significant use of Internet resources, for example).

In a series of course modules we will explore how the Russian provinces have been imagined, presented, and distorted by those who inhabit them, by those who mythologize them, by those who dread them, and by those who love them. Three short papers, a final presentation, and a term paper. The course is taught in Russian, with participation in discussions required. All assignments are in Russian.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 551. Old Russian Literature.

Russian Literature in Russian

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

As usual, there is a problem with terminology. What I am calling Old Russian is frequently called Kievan, Kievan Rus', Old Ukrainian and other things. Also, it is common to take Old Russian up to 1700, so that our textbooks will extend beyond the usual term of 1500. Readings in the course will begin with Church Slavonic monuments that were part of a literary inheritance common to all Slavs. When we begin reading Old Russian monuments – Kievan, early Muscovite, late Muscovite – we will examine both content and historical context. We will also track the emergence of East Slavic linguistic features in the different (Byzantine) literary genres and in 17th-century religious and secular writings which mark Muscovy's cultural turn to the West.

Origins and development of literary trends and genres – chronicles, historical tales, lives – 10th–17th century. Through the reading of selected texts, special attention is devoted to religious and ideological movements as well as to the problems of language and style.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 563. Russian Literary Movements and Genres.

Russian Literature in Russian

Section 001 – Musical Compositions in Russian Literature. Taught in Russian.

Instructor(s): Boris Kats

Prerequisites: A reading knowledge of Russian is required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This interdisciplinary course aims at elucidating some aspects of the problem of musical influence upon Russian poetry and prose. The discussion of the problem, limited to two (of many) senses of the term "a musical composition" (or "a musical form" or "a musical piece"), will combine two directions of the musicological approach to a literary text. In the first the main questions will include: Is it possible to find out in poems or novels the compositional structures more typical for music than for literature (i.e., fugue or sonata form)? If yes, what does it mean – a pure coincidence, or the result of explicit/implicit interaction between two different kinds of art? Does it give us a new opportunity to delve into the literary text in its structural and/or semantic dimensions? In the second direction the questions include: In what way does this or that musical piece influence the literary text? For example, what does Beethoven's "The Kreutzer Sonata" have in common with the famous Tolstoy novel of the same name, or Bizet's "Carmen" with Blok's lyric cycle? What role does the description of a musical piece play in the literary context? Do certain musical pieces serve as obvious or hidden subtexts for certain literary works? Why do some writers give their works the names of musical genres? To what degree, for example, may we say Andrey Bely's "Symphonies" are symphonies? At the crossroad of two these directions the real influence of music upon Russian literature from Pushkin to Nabokov will be shown (quite apart from some widely accepted myths) in its coordination with definite genres and stylistic movements.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 652. Directed Reading in Russian Literature.

Russian Literature in Russian

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of Chairman. Graduate standing. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

RUSSIAN 795 / REES 795 / HISTORY 795 / POLSCI 795 / ECON 795 / GEOG 795. Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies.

Section 001 – Topic?

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 795.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RUSSIAN 856. Seminar in Russian Literature.

Russian Literature in Russian

Section 001 – Late 20th-Century Russian Literature. Meets with Russian 474.001.

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Late Twentieth-Century Russian Literature surveys the work of major Russian authors in the last decades of the century. It examines the complex maps of a literature initially divided by ideology, place of production, and cultural orientation, and then re-integrated, but with major qualifications, by historical transformation. The re-making of Russian literature during and after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the emergence of new literary discourses and institutions in the 1990s, and the savage polemics about the nature and function of literature and of writers which have characterized that period will be among the major themes. Knowledge of Russian not required. This course may be used to fulfill one of the requirements for the undergraduate degree in Russian. Three hours per week, with informal lectures and discussion providing the teaching structure. Two papers and three in-class exams will be required of undergraduates, graduate students may write one long paper instead.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor.

RUSSIAN 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

RUSSIAN 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for RUSSIAN.


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This page was created at 8:40 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.


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