College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Sociology


This page was created at 8:41 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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SOC 425 / GERMAN 432. The German Model: Business, Labor, and the State in the 20th Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeremy Brooke Straughn

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 432.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 435. Urban Inequality and Conflict.

Section 001 Meets with AMCULT 410.001.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline Olvera

Prerequisites: Credit is granted for only one course from SOC 435 and 535. (3). Does not meet Soc. doctoral requirements. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An examination of the social and spatial factors affecting the location, social organization, structure and functioning of American cities. Although both the internal arrangements and external connections of cities are analyzed, heaviest emphasis is placed on the examination of the internal arrangements of cities within the context of contemporary urban problems found in the American city will be utilized as example and the basis for discussion.

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SOC 440. Sociology of Work.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ching Kwan Lee (chinglee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers a general overview on core issues in the sociology of work. After reviewing major sociological perspectives on work and occupations, we will focus on labor market and inequality, work organizations, ethnographies of the workplace, globalization of production, diversity of workers, labor and social movements, intersection of work and family, unemployment and voluntary work, labor systems under capitalism and socialism, etc. Course materials will draw from different theoretical perspectives and from different societies. Format: each class meeting involves 40 minutes of lecture, followed by group discussions. From time to time, we will show labor-related films. Requirement: written assignments and a final take-home examination.

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SOC 450. Political Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to political sociology with a particular emphasis on the relationship between economics and politics. Basic concepts such as power, state, nation, and class will be introduced and applied to the analysis of the development and change of political systems in historical and comparative perspective. The course examines (a) the historical origins of democracy, fascism, and communism as political systems, (b) imperialism, development, and revolution in the Third World, and (c) class, class coalitions, and the state in post New-Deal U.S. politics. Introductory courses in sociology or political science desirable but not required. Lecture/discussion; midterm and final.

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SOC 454. Law and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel H Sharphorn

Prerequisites: One sociology introduction. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to examine the organization of law in society and the relationships between law and society. The approach will be primarily from a sociological perspective; however, we will also explore the views of legal scholars, anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, and others. While the course will be a survey of "law and social organization" in general, we will focus on current topics of special interest as a device for our study: the death penalty, rape laws, affirmative action and anti-discrimination laws, university rules and regulations, and others. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of the extent of the study of law and social organization and the leading theories and ideas about it, and will be asked to think critically and independently about legal systems and the role of law in society.

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SOC 455 / RELIGION 455. Religion and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terence James McGinn

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Since 9/11/01, religion has moved center-stage in the American consciousness. From the "War on Terrorism" to the "Pledge of Allegiance" case, religion is centrally involved in many of the social conflicts and movements that fill today's headlines: as a social identity, as a core set of beliefs, as a basis for social judgment, as a motivation for action.

This course uses sociological methods to explore the interplay of sacred and secular in modern society. What is religion and the religious? How is the sense of the sacred affected by the social? In what ways does religion, in turn, affect other areas of social life?

The class employs a variety of learning formats, including discussions, study groups, lectures, videos, and student research presentations. Required readings are primarily in course pack form and include the writings of both classic and contemporary sociologists ranging from Weber and Durkheim to Berger and Bellah.

Renowned sociologist of religion Robert Wuthnow (Princeton) will be a guest this term. Classroom phone interviews with "living cases" will include atheist Michael Newdow (California "Pledge" plaintiff).

Students' understanding and integration of the material is demonstrated through a series of quizzes, three short papers, and a group presentation project.

Junior status or above is required. Upper-level sociology or religion concentrators may request overrides if the course is fully subscribed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 460. Social Change.

Section 001 Labor and Global Social Change.

Instructor(s): Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/soc/460/001.nsf

Economic globalization is one of the most powerful drivers of social change in the contemporary world. This course asks what economic globalization is, why it takes the form that it does, and how it affects the lives and livelihoods of working people in the poor countries of the global South and the rich countries of the global North. We survey the extraordinary range of economic realities faced by men and women who must labor for their income, and the major structural changes in those realities in the last quarter century. We consider social science approaches to understanding these dynamics, including neoclassical economic theory, world systems theory, and regulation theory, as well as the analysis of NGO critics of the current model of economic globalization. Our focus is on how these theories explain recent trends, and what these explanations suggest about the best strategies for improving the situation of workers in the global economy.

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SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 001 Sociology of Aging. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/soc/495/001.nsf

The objective of this course is to increase students' understanding of the aging process from a sociological/social gerontological perspective. Topics covered include demographic trends; stereotypical misconceptions of aging; theories of aging; longevity enhancement techniques; beauty; sexuality in late life; housing issues; physical and mental health; work and retirement; women and aging; death and dying, and more. Students will explore the meaning of aging throughout the life course and acquire a deeper understanding of what it means to grow old in American society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 002 Women and Work. [3 credits]. Meets with WOMENSTD 483.001.

Instructor(s): Laurie A Morgan

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/womenstd/483/001.nsf

This course will draw on empirical research and theory to address a wide range of issues regarding gender and work. We will study the construction of gender through work, effects of changing technology, structures of opportunity, emotion work, globalization of women's work (both through capital and labor mobility), sexual harassment, work and family, housework, gender segregation of jobs, pay inequality, and trends in paid labor force participation and attachment. My objective is that you come away from the course able to engage scholarship as well as popular debates on women and work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 004 Detroit: Its History & Future. Meets 3/4-3/13 with field trip on Sat. 3/8/03. [1 credit]. [Drop/Add deadline=March 5].

Instructor(s): W Reynolds Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~socdept/courses/soc495/

*A One-Credit Mini Course to be Taught Three Times in the Winter Semester of 2003 (Sociology 495, sections 001, 002, 003)

Detroit was the world's most important metropolis during the Twentieth Century. The world's most popular means of transportation was developed there a means of mobility that produced social change and revolutionized economies on all populated continents. The system of modern industrial production was perfected in Detroit and then spread around the world, giving us low-priced, high quality consumer goods. The modern American blue-collar middle class developed first in Detroit thanks to the emergence of effective unions. More so than in other US cities, the wealth of Detroit's families in the 1920s led to a magnificent array of breath-taking buildings, homes and monuments. The Allies defeated the German and Japanese dictators in World War II because of the engineers and production line workers in Detroit the world's true Arsenal of Democracy. Yet, more so than any other U.S. city, economic conflict was vividly played out in Detroit. Equally devastating has been racial conflict. Detroit is the only U.S. city in which the federal military has been called to the streets four times to stop whites and blacks from killing each other. Detroit, once the symbol of U.S. industrial prowess became, following World War II, the symbol of racial, economic and geographic polarization.

This mini course will examine social, economic and racial trends in metropolitan Detroit, looking both at their history and implications for the future. The course will consist of four classroom meetings and an all-day bus tour of metropolitan Detroit on a Saturday.

The first section class code # 28179 in the UM Time schedule, will meet on Tuesday afternoon, March 4 and Thursday afternoon, March 6 at 4 PM in 3416 Mason Hall. Saturday March 8 will be spent touring metropolitan Detroit. Then this course will meet on the following Tuesday March 11 and Thursday March 13 afternoons.

The second section class code # 28180 will meet on Tuesday, March 18, Thursday, March 20; Saturday, March 22, Tuesday, March 25 and Thursday, March 27.

The third section class code #28181 will meet on Tuesday, April 1, Thursday, April 3, Saturday, April 5, Tuesday, April 8 and Tuesday, April 10.

I strongly encourage the enrollment of both undergraduate and graduate students but a person may enroll in only one section.

Classroom sessions will be devoted to a presentation and discussion of materials about Detroit linked to the readings. A portion of the final class will be devoted to a quiz about materials covered in the course. Assigned readings include the following:

  • Devil's Night and Other True Tales of Detroit by Ze've Chafets (New York:Random House, 1990). Copies may be borrowed from the instructor but must be returned to him. This book should be read before the first meeting of the course.
  • Detroit Divided by Reynolds Farley, Sheldon Danziger and Harry Holzer. (New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2000)
  • The Origins of the Urban Crisis, Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit, (Princeton,: Princeton University Press, 1996). Available in paperback for about $15.16.
  • One section of Someone Else's House: American's Unfinished Struggle for Integration by Tamar Jacoby, (New York: The Free Press, 1998). Available in paperback for about $ 14.40.

Requirements for this one-credit course include attending the four classroom sessions, the Saturday tour of metropolitan Detroit, the assigned readings and satisfactory completion of the quiz.

For additional information or for a copy of the tentative syllabus, please send a message to the instructor: renf@umich.edu.

This will be an interesting and valuable course with a special appeal to those who are interested in metropolitan planning, in the history of cities or in those social, economic and racial trends that have shaped metropolitan America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 005 Detroit: Its History & Future. Meets 3/18-3/27 with field trip on Sat. 3/22/03. [1 credit]. [Drop/Add deadline=March 19].

Instructor(s): W Reynolds Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~socdept/courses/soc495/

See Sociology 495.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 006 Detroit: Its History & Future. Meets 4/1-4/10 with field trip on Sat. 4/5/03. [1 credit]. [Drop/Add deadline=April 2].

Instructor(s): W Reynolds Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~socdept/courses/soc495/

See Sociology 495.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 496. Special Course.

Section 001 Race, Ethnicity, Health. Meets with Soc 596.001.

Instructor(s): David R Williams (wildavid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course critically examines the health status of the poor, and of major racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States. Attention will be focused on the patterned ways in which the health of these groups is embedded in the social, cultural, and political, and economic contexts and arrangements of U.S. society. Topics covered include the meaning and measurement of race, the ways in which racism affects health, the historic uses of minorities in medical research, how acculturation and migration affects health, and an examination of the specific health problems that disproportionately affect the minority group members.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 500. Orientation Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): F. Müge Göçek

Prerequisites: Must be enrolled in the doctoral program of the Sociology Department. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 504 / AMCULT 504. American Immigration: Sociological Perspectives.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; seniors with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Both the study of immigration and the questions that study raises are at the very root of social science. In this course we survey the literature that gives evidence of the major concepts, questions, and approaches which sociologists have used to study immigration, as well as the interface between immigration, race, and ethnicity in America. In this seminar, we will seek to focus each session on a different topic, such as the origin of ethnic stratification, race, and racism; the contrasting theoretical explanations of assimilation and internal colonialism for the reality of group differences in social outcomes in America; the different levels of analysis, micro vs. macro approaches to immigration; the causes and consequences of the differential incorporation of immigrants in American society; political vs. economic immigrants as different social types; middleman minorities vs. the ethnic enclave vs. the ethnic economy as models of immigrant adaptation; women and migration; and social networks and gender as the link between micro and macro levels of analysis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 506. Theory and Practice.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark S Mizruchi (mizruchi@umich.edu) , Renee Anspach (ranspach@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the second of a two-term theory sequence required of all sociology department graduate students. We begin by exploring how classical and contemporary sociologists, representing a variety of perspectives and intellectual orientations, have theorized about several core issues: the nature of society and the social, the individual-society relationship, identity and the self, culture, and social structure. In the second part of the course we examine how sociological theories can illuminate several substantive areas in the discipline, including organizations and the economy, the professions, development, and various forms of social inequality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 512. Practicum in Survey Research.

Section 001 Survey Methods for 2002 DAS. Meets with NRE 501.042.

Instructor(s): Martha Hill

Prerequisites: Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/soc/512/001.nsf

This course focuses on learning survey techniques through classroom lectures and workshops by experts in survey methods, and by actively participating in the design and implementation of a full-scale survey. It is the first in the pair of courses constituting the Detroit Area Study (DAS) practicum and the second in the full series of DAS courses. The aim of this practicum is to provide working knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of the survey method and its application to real-world issues. An optional proseminar (SOC 501) in the prior fall academic term has focused the issues the survey will cover and developed a draft questionnaire. The present course will carry that initial draft questionnaire through important survey design steps, including questionnaire-refinement, and on through data-collection stages, with accompanying instruction from experienced survey methodologists on the underpinnings of survey techniques and current research on survey methods. Those wishing to complete the practicum, and analyze survey data to produce an original research paper on a topic of their choice, can then take the final course in the DAS sequence (SOC 513) in the following fall.

The present course (512) concentrates on survey methods development and testing of questionnaire, sample design and selection, pretesting, and interviewing and produces a full-scale personal interview survey of residents in the metropolitan Detroit area. The course includes lecture/discussion sessions and workshops. During the workshops, students receive practical instruction in survey methods. The skills taught in the work groups are preparation for out of class fieldwork that culminates in students interviewing a scientifically selected sample of residents in the greater Detroit metropolitan area.

The topic of this winter 2003 survey concerns social transformation and the new world created by the information technology revolution. The focus is on transformations in social networks, social identity, social values, and work and consumer participation. The ethnic diversity of the greater Detroit area is of particular interest in this research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 520. Sociology of Knowledge.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret R Somers (peggs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/soc/520/001.nsf

The sociology of knowledge is the study of the complex relationship between the practical world of social organization and the cognitive maps called "knowledge" with which we engage that world. It is a sociological approach to the questions of how we think, why we think the things we do, why certain claims to truth win the privilege of being called knowledge, whereas others are discarded as mere fantasy, mysticism, or just plain falsehoods.

Sociology, like all the social sciences, shares with the natural sciences the claim to knowledge that has survived the rigorous of all possible means to determine objective truth. But how does this fit with the changing definitions of truth we know to be essential parts of our history? And how can it help us to make sense of the cultural and narrative dimensions of knowledge that have become increasingly recognized? These are some of the questions and issues that this graduate seminar will explore.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 521 / CAAS 521. African American Intellectual Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alford A Young Jr (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior standing. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 521.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 522. Practicum in Qualitative Research Methods.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ching Kwan Lee (chinglee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the first part of a two-term course on ethnography and the "ethnographic imagination". It explores the world of ethnographic research through critical reading of exemplary works in sociology, as well as explicit methodological formulations of the logic, the practice, and theoretical potentials of ethnography. The focus of the course is on the intersection of ethnography, theory and sociology. Readings will cover classics and contemporary works in different ethnographic traditions (e.g., the Chicago School, grounded theory, the extended case method, feminist ethnography) and their applications to diverse settings and topics. Half way through the first academic term, students begin to develop an ethnographic project of their choice, conduct fieldwork and comment on each others' field notes and analysis. The practicum sequel in the following academic term is a hands-on exercise of the craft of ethnography. We will concentrate on each others' projects and engage with issues emerging from actual field experiences, with reference to those covered in canonical texts in the first academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

SOC 533. Practicum in Comparative Historical Sociology II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Howard A Kimeldorf (hkimel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This two course sequence (Soc 532, 533) is intended as an introduction to the methods of historical and comparative research in sociology. The first academic term will be devoted to intensive reading and discussion of work that explores some of the key problems and approaches within this tradition. We will conclude by reading several exemplary works of historical and comparative sociology, which will guide students in drafting individual research proposals. The second academic term will focus on producing an original research paper utilizing historical and/or comparative approaches.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 544. Sociology of Family and Kinship.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Pamela J Smock (pjsmock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course considers a broad range of issues central to family and household studies. Special attention is given to exploring the life course perspective emphasizing the ways in which individuals and their families change over the life course and the ways social change modifies individual life course processes. Particular concern will be given to conceptual and methodological issues involved with the study of family and transitions. Examines theoretical approaches useful for understanding kin networks, childbearing, and marital formation and dissolution.

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SOC 547. Gender and Sexuality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karin A Martin (kamartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/soc/547/001.nsf

This core course is intended to help students prepare for the prelim in gender and sexuality. We will ask what does the field of gender and sexuality look like? How did this field take shape? What are the substantive areas? What are the debates? We will read both empirical and theoretical work and will concentrate mostly on scholarship by sociologists and social scientists.

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SOC 560. Power, History, and Social Change.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 595. Special Courses.

Section 001 Sociology of Human Fertility.

Instructor(s): Bill Axinn (baxinn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable; Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/soc/595/001.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 595. Special Courses.

Section 002 Science, Technology, and Society.

Instructor(s): Jason D Owen-Smith

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable; Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/soc/595/002.nsf

Science and technology are fundamental components of contemporary life. Science and technology studies represent a growing and increasingly important component of research across social science and humanities fields. This Ph.D. level seminar offers students a broad overview of economic, sociological, and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of science and technology with a particular focus on reciprocal relationships across socio-cultural, economic, and technical systems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 596. Special Courses.

Section 001 Race, Ethnicity, Health. Meets with Soc 496.001.

Instructor(s): David R Williams (wildavid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable; Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/soc/596/001.nsf

This course critically examines the health status of the poor, and of major racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States. Attention will be focused on the patterned ways in which the health of these groups is embedded in the social, cultural, and political, and economic contexts and arrangements of U.S. society. Topics covered include the meaning and measurement of race, the ways in which racism affects health, the historic uses of minorities in medical research, how acculturation and migration affects health, and an examination of the specific health problems that disproportionately affect the minority group members.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 597. Special Courses.

Section 001 Survey Management.

Instructor(s): Steven G Heeringa

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable; Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course describes modern practices in the administration of large-scale surveys. It reviews alternative management structures for large field organizations, supervisory and training regimens, handling of turnover, and multiple surveys with the same staff. Practical issues in budgeting of surveys are reviewed with examples from actual surveys. Scheduling of sequential activities in the design, data collection, and processing of data is described.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 597. Special Courses.

Section 002 Total Survey Error.

Instructor(s): Robert M Groves

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable; Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course reviews the total error structure of sample survey data, reviewing current research findings on the magnitudes of different error sources, design features that affect their magnitudes, and interrelationships among the errors. Coverage, nonresponse, sampling, measurement errors, interviewer effects, questionnaire effects, and mode of data collection effects are reviewed. Statistical and social science approaches to the error sources are compared. Cost models related to the error sources are reviewed with the perspective of assessing balance between cost of error reduction and error impact on the survey's success. Prerequisite: Sociology/Psychology 612, Psych 988.003/Soc 597.001

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 597. Special Courses.

Section 003 Cognition, Communication, and Survey Measurement. Meets with Psych 988.002.

Instructor(s): Frederick G Conrad

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable; Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Survey data are only as meaningful as the answers that respondents provide. Hence, the processes that underlie respondents' answers are of crucial importance. This course draws on current theorizing in cognitive and social psychology pertaining to issues like language comprehension, information storage and retrieval, autobiographical memory, social judgment, and the communicative dynamics of survey interviewing to understand how respondents deal with the questions asked and arrive at an answer. Of particular interest are the implications of cognitive and communicative processes for data quality and questionnaire construction. The applied topics covered include question wording and comprehension; the impact of response alternatives on respondents' answers; the emergence of question order and context effects in attitude measurement; and the communicative and retrieval processes that affect the validity of retrospective behavioral reports. Throughout, factors are explored that may potentially bias reports, as well as factors that are likely to improve data quality. Prerequisite: Some background in psychology is helpful, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 610. Statistical Methods.

Section 001 Multivariate Techniques.

Instructor(s): Mark S Mizruchi (mizruchi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SOC 510 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/soc/610/001.nsf

This course is the second portion of the two-term sequence (Sociology 510, 610) required of all graduate students in the department of Sociology.. It consists of two weekly class sessions plus a lab-discussion. This term focuses on multivariate techniques, especially multiple linear regression. The lab sessions will be used to discuss problems encountered in the lectures and written assignments and to refine students' statistical computing skills. The course assumes knowledge of the material covered in Sociology 510. It assumes no mathematical knowledge beyond high school algebra, but students will have an opportunity to develop elementary skills in more advanced mathematical techniques.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 612 / PSYCH 687. Methods of Survey Sampling.

Section 001 Methods of Survey Sampling.

Instructor(s): Trivellore E Raghunathan

Prerequisites: Two graduate-level courses in statistical methods. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Methods of Survey Sampling is a moderately advanced course in applied statistics with an emphasis on the practical problems of sample design. Topics covered are probability sampling (including stratified, clustered, and multi-stage designs), unequal probabilities and probabilities proportional to size, area sampling, ratio means, sampling errors, frame problems, cost factors, and practical designs and procedures. Emphasis is placed on practical considerations rather than on theoretical derivations. The course includes an exercise that integrates the different techniques into a comprehensive sample design. (Video Course) Prerequisite: Two graduate-level courses in statistical methods.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 630. Research Methods in Population and Human Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara A Anderson (barba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SOC 530. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/soc/630/001.nsf

The demographic perspective has become increasingly important in the social sciences. Demographically-based life table measures of employment, marriage, and other socially important areas have become prominent. This course aims for the student to understand the philosophy, the strengths, and the weaknesses of demographically-based measures. An important issue is: What measure is appropriate for addressing what question? This course aims to enable students to apply demographic methods in areas such as education, marriage and marital dissolution, labor force analysis, and study of health status, as well as in the classic demographic areas of mortality, fertility, and migration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 695. Directed Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed research on a topic of the student's choice. An individual instructor must agree to direct such research, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SOC 696. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SOC 717 / STATS 580 / BIOSTAT 617. Methods and Theory of Sample Design.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Three or more courses in statistics and preferably a course in methods of survey sampling. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/biostat/617/001.nsf

Theory underlying sample designs and estimation procedures commonly used in survey practice. Simple random sampling, stratification systematic sampling, cluster sampling, multi-stage sampling, sampling with probability proportional to size, replicated sampling, multi-phase sampling. Post-stratification, ratio, regression and difference estimation. Variance estimation with complex sample designs: Taylor series method, repeated replications, jackknife repeated replications. Nonresponse weighting adjustments and imputation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 785 / PSYCH 785. Group Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eugene Burnstein (geneburn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 785.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 803. Research Seminar in Race and Ethnicity.

Section 001 [Credits?]

Instructor(s): David R Harris (drharris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://mywebpages.comcast.net/drharris/soc803.html

This course engages major issues in the study of race and ethnicity through a combination of readings, group discussions, and presentations. Every effort will be made to integrate perspectives from disciplines other than sociology, and to address racial and ethnic issues outside the traditional Black-white paradigm.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 810 / STATS 817 / PSYCH 817 / EDUC 817. Interdisciplinary Seminar in Quantitative Social Science Methodology.

Section 001 MEETS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY, BEGINNING JANUARY 8, 2002. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, and graduate-level course in STATS at the level of STAT 500 and 501. (1). This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U." May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Statistics 817.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 825 / HISTORY 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SOC 830. Research Seminar in Social Demography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Pamela J Smock (pjsmock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Population Background. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is offered every term. Students in the Social Demography Program are expected to attend it continuously when in residence for 1-3 credits per term. Its objectives are to socialize students to be professional researchers and help students write research papers. It consists of the PSC Brownbag Seminar, the Student Research Forum, and group and individualized meetings with the instructor. Although students are enrolled for only 1 or 2 credits most of the time, they are required to register for full (3) credits at least once, in the term they complete and present a research paper. It is expected that students who use Sociology 830 to fulfill their research seminar requirement in the Department of Sociology be enrolled in Sociology 830 for at least two terms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

SOC 850 / PSYCH 890 / EPID 850. Psychosocial Factors in Mental Health I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David R Williams (wildavid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Selected advanced topics including problems of diagnosing psychopathology through community surveys, psychosocial predictors of mental illness, primary prevention and coping with undesirable life events. This seminar brings together a multidisciplinary set of faculty and students from sociology, psychology, health behavior and health education, psychiatry, and epidemiology to present and discuss recent research on the social and psychological sources of mental and physical health. Substantively, the seminar will focus on the role of psychosocial and social structural factors in the etiology and course of health and illness, including the study of life events, chronic role strains, resources for adapting to potential stressors, and the actual process of coping and adaptation. The application of social epidemiology to problems of service utilization may also be considered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 895. Special Seminars.

Section 001 Women and Work. [3 Credits]. Meets with WS 801.001.

Instructor(s): Laurie A Morgan

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/soc/895/001.nsf

This course will draw on empirical research and theory, primarily from sociology, to address a wide range of issues regarding gender and work. Through qualitative case studies of individual occupations (e.g. marines, clerical workers, managers, engineers, flight attendants, lawyers, nurses, doctors, manufacturing workers, domestic workers, interactive service workers, contingent workers), along with quantitative studies of the overall labor force, we will examine the construction of gender through work, effects of changing technology, structures of opportunity, emotion work, globalization of women's work (through both capital and labor mobility), sexual harassment, work and family, housework, gender segregation of jobs, pay inequality, and trends in paid labor force participation and attachment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 895. Special Seminars.

Section 002 Research Methods for Evaluating Social Programs and Human Service Organizations. [3 credits]. Meets with Psych 773.001 and SW 817.001.

Instructor(s): Daphna R Oyserman (daphna@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 773.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 895. Special Seminars.

Section 003 Black Church and Faith-Based Human Development, Economic Empowerment, Community Revitalization. [3 credits]. Meets with DOC 828.001/CAAS 828.001.

Instructor(s): Wallace Jr

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 828.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 988 / PSYCH 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 001 Topic? [2 Credits].

Instructor(s): Richard E Nisbett (nisbett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 988.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 988 / PSYCH 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 002 Cognition, Communication, and Survey Measurement . [ 3 credits]. Meets with Soc 597.003.

Instructor(s): Frederick G Conrad

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 988.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 988 / PSYCH 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 003 Prevention Research. Promoting Well-Being: Poverty, Race-ethnicity, & Mental Health. [3 credits]. Meets with DOC 817.

Instructor(s): Oyserman, Mowbray

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/988/003.nsf

See Psychology 988.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SOC 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alford A Young Jr (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Witner Academic Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for SOC.


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