College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Spanish


This page was created at 8:41 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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SPANISH 405. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Teresa L Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276. Taught in Spanish. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/spanish/405/001.nsf

This course is an introduction to the main concepts and methods of analysis of linguistics, focusing on Spanish. The central part of the course introduces concepts and techniques of the analysis of word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics), and sounds (phonology). The last third of the course examines subfields of linguistics such as pyscholinguistics (study of language acquisition) and sociolinguistics (the study of language variation).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 410 / ROMLING 410. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego De Blibeche (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer participants a theoretical foundation in Spanish phonetics and phonology. It includes the study of articulatory phonetics, phological theory, distinctive feature analysis, practice in transcription, lab practice, contrastive analysis of English and Spanish sounds, with special attention to those sounds of Spanish that are most difficult for English speakers to acquire. The grade will be based on a midterm and a final exam, four quizzes, various homework assignments, and a final paper. Course is conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 430. Advanced Studies in Hispanic Culture and Society.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Historical Narratives of Latin America.

Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). For Grad credit, must do regular course work which is assigned, as well as write a 20 page research paper.May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Latin American "historical novelists" of the second half of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century sought to construct their nations by offering models in fiction which are more projective than retrospective, more erotic than data-driven. This course will study the three stages of these "historical narratives" through the "postivist" El Zarco (Mexico, 1888), written by Ignacio Altamirano; the "popular" La sangre y la esperanza (Chile, 1920), by Nicomedes Guzmán; and the "populist" Doña Bárbara (Venezuela, 1929), by Rómulo Gallegos.

Course requirements include oral presentations and three take-home exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 435. Independent Study.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of department. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office.) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 442. Testimonial Narrative.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Terror, Memory, and Human Rights.

Instructor(s): Lucia M Suarez (suarez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276 and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this class is to analyze the historical and political production and use of testimonio literature in Latin America. In the last twenty years testimonio literature has been the topic of heated debate ranging from scholars claiming its importance as a political tool presenting the voice and circumstances of marginalized and oppressed peoples to critics deriding it as lies.

We will explore the forms in which literature is testimonial, as well as the ways testimonial exposure has succeeded in, or failed to, enact political change and social awareness. Some of the many questions to be addressed include: What are the distinctions between testimonial literature and legal testimony? Can testimony be equivalent to truth? What role do memory and political agendas play in the production of testimonial literature? What do we expect from testimonial literature? How did the Rigoberta controversy affect the way other testimonial literature is read? Can fiction be testimonial?

Through journal writing, class presentations, film viewing, and debates, we will be able to arrive at our own conclusions. All classes and most readings will be conducted in Spanish. Students are expected to be active participants in this seminar style class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 458. The Picaresque Novel.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique Garcia Santo-Tomas (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

El propósito de este curso panorámico es introducir al estudiante en un terreno fascinante de la literatura del Siglo de oro: la representación de lo marginal en la narrativa del Renacimiento y del Barroco desde el fenómeno de la llamada "novela picaresca". A través de textos capitales, estudiaremos diversos arquetipos de personajes 'alternativos' desde puntos de vista de importancia primordial en el pensamiento contemporáneo, para construir así una 'poética de lo marginal' que nos devuelva a la idea primigenia de que toda obra maestra lleva consigo la creación de personajes imperecederos. Los textos estudiados serán el anónimo Lazarillo de Tormes, la novela corta Rinconete y Cortadillo de Cervantes, El Buscón de Quevedo, La hija de Celestina de Salas Barbadillo, Aventuras del Bachiller Trapaza de Castillo Solórzano, y selecciones del Guzmán de Alfarache de Mateo Alemán. La clase será en español.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 468. Modern Spanish Theater.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank P Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Twentieth-century Spanish theater presents us with many literary and social issues that reflect the troublesome history of the country. The plays we will read go from the beginning of the century to the post-Franco period and include authors such as Miguel Mihura, Federico Garcia Lorca, and Antonio Buero Vallejo.

Students are required to participate actively in class discussion and to write a series of papers on the plays we read.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 475. Latin-American Narrative.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Modernismo.

Instructor(s): Jossianna Arroyo (jarroyo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Conducted in Spanish. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Modernismo": Literatures & Cultures in Turn of the Century Spanish America

What were the social and cultural conditions of Spanish America's "Modernismo"? And which were the main conceptualizations in Modernista's views of art and politics? As a cultural and literary style original from Spanish America, "Modernismo" has been described by some critics as an "ivory tower" movement . Faced with the challenges between technique, science, and spirituality, Modernismo's political and social commitment was present in their theoretical views of art, religion, and language, but also in allegorical symbols such as the swan, "azul," and the modernist "retablo." In this course we will shed light on the complexities of discourses that shaped Nineteenth century Spanish America to focus on the political, cultural, and controversial nature of languages and cultures in "Modernismo." Through the analysis of the works of figures such as José Martí, Rubén Darío, and Julián del Casal, as well as some women authors such as Ana Roqué and Mercedes Cabello de Carbonera, we will discuss themes such as the relationship between art and technique; women, gender, and the language of poetry; "raros" queerness and writing; and religion and sprituality, among others. Class will be conducted in Spanish. An oral report and a 15 page final paper are required.

Simón Rodríguez, Obras (Selections)
José Martí, Ismaelillo, Crónicas (Selections)
Rubén Darío Azul, Los raros (Selections)
Julián del Casal, Poemas (Selections)
Ana Roqué, Luz y Sombra (Novela)
Mercedes Cabello de Carbonera, Blanca Sol (Novela)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 476. Latin-American Poetry.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 El sueño y la meditación poética.

Instructor(s): Hugo E Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Conducted in Spanish. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Qué son los sueños? Qué misterio guardan? Qué revelan sobre nuestro ser, sobre el mundo que habitamos; sobre la vida, la existencia, la realidad, el tiempo, el más allá, la muerte? Estas y similares preguntas se han planteado filósofos, poetas y místicos de todas las épocas y latitudes. En este curso estudiaremos las respuestas que cuatro autores hispánicos del siglo veinte han ofrecido a estas interrogantes de raigambre metafísica: María Zambrano (España), Humberto Díaz Casanueva (Chile), Alejandra Pizarnik (Argentina) y Jaime Sáenz (Bolivia). Apoyándonos en la lectura cuidadosa de los textos seleccionados de estos autures, conversaremos no sólo sobre las cuestiones y los planteamientos que éstos nos ofrecen respecto al valor congnoscitivo de los sueños, sino que también reflexionaremos sobre los puntos de convergencia y divergencia que hay entre el discurso filosófico y el poético.

MATERIALES PARA EL CURSO:
Los sueños y el tiempo de María Zambrano.
Obras completas de Alejandra Pizarnik.
Paquete de fotocopias.

DISTRIBUCIÓN DE LA CALIFICACIÓN DEL CURSO:
Dos exámenes parciales (15 % c/u)...........30%
Dos trabajos escritos (20% c/u)................40%
Participation .......................................25%
Asistencia y puntualidad .........................5%

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 What can you make of Julio Cortázar?

Instructor(s): Santiago Colas (scolas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will explore the fiction (and some of the poetry) of the Argentine writer Julio Cortázar (1914-1984). Through slow readings of some of his short fiction, his challenging, experimental novel Rayuela, and a handful of poems, we will study the various contexts out of which this writing emerged, and, still more importantly, explore what, if anything, this writing tells us today. All readings and regular weekly writing in Spanish. Discussion primarily in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002 Borges.

Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Este curso se centra en un estudio de los ensayos, narrativas breves, poesía, e invenciones literarias creadas por Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1988). Estudiaremos el uso de citas y personajes históricos apócrifos en sus obras, su fijación por las bibliotecas, los laberintos, los relojes de arena, los espacios y tiempos indefinidos, y los universos por descrubir. Dada la extensa producción de y sobre Borges, este curso explora la consolidación de Borges como un género literario "en sí" durante la primera etapa del escritor. Las lecturas del curso se dedicarán a explorar cómo se consolida "el género Borges" en las siguientes obras del insigne autor argentino: Fervor de Buenos Aires, Luna de enfrente, Cuaderno San Martín, Discusión, Historia universal de la infamia, Historia de la eternidad, Ficciones, Artificios y El Aleph.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 635. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 650. Study of Spanish Medieval Literature.

Section 001 Loved Philology. Meets with ROMLANG 680.001 and FRENCH 681.

Instructor(s): Catherine Brown

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/romlang/680/001.nsf

See Romance Language Teaching Methods 680.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 855. Special Topics Seminar.

Section 001 Razón histórica, razón poética, razón poscolonial: APROXIMACIONES TEÓRICAS A LA LITERATURA MEXICANA DEL SIGLO VEINTE.

Instructor(s): Sergio Hugo Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/spanish/855/001.nsf

En este seminario estudiaremos tres formas distintas de conceptuar y de aproximarse a la actividad teorética (el pensar) y literaria (la escritura): la razón histórica, la razón poética y la razón poscolonial. Las preguntas fundamentales que guiarán nuestras reflexiones y conversaciones a lo largo del semestre serán las siguientes: cómo teorizar, interpretar y escribir textos? Cuál es la función de la teoría, de la crítica y de la literatura? Cómo y por qué se diferencian estos quehaceres? Para responder a estas preguntas recurriremos a las teorías y/o las críticas de la razón histórica, poética y poscolonial desarrolladas por diversos autores americanos y europeos a lo largo del siglo veinte y las compararemos o relacionaremos con algunos textos literarios (poemas, novelas y ensayos) de autores mexicanos contemporáneos. Entre los autores que leeremos figuran: Roger Bartra, Donna Brody, Michel de Certeau, Wilhelm Dilthey, Roberto Fernández Retamar, Carlos Fuentes, Hans-Georg Gadamer, José Gorostiza, Luce Irigaray, Claire Elise Katz, Neil Larsen, Emmanuel Levinas, José Ortega y Gasset, Octavio Paz, Diane Perpich, Richard Rorty, Adolfo Sánchez Vázquez, María Zambrano, Leopoldo Zea, Ewa Plonowska Ziarek y Xavier Zubiri (Para aquellos que deseen saber cuáles textos leeremos específicamente, favor de enviar un mensaje a la siguiente dirección: shmoreno@umich.edu). La nota final para la clase estará basada en la escritura de un ensayo semanal de quinientas palabras cada uno y en la participación en la clase.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 870. Seminar in Hispanic Literature of the 19th and 20th Centuries.

Section 002 Terror, Memory, and Human Rights in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Meets with Complit 751.001.

Instructor(s): Lucia M Suarez (suarez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Recent literature from Haitian and Dominican authors living in the United States, signals post-traumatic stress syndrome in families that have escaped political repression, violence, and/or torture. A large number of diaspora literature from the Caribbean demonstrates the numerous ways people in violated communities lose a sense of dignity when it is trampled by different factors, including dictatorships, cold war policies, and extreme poverty. Diaspora literature also points to how Caribbean enclaves in the United States experience and/or reproduce the systemic dysfunctional conditions they have escaped, such as racism, sexism, and violence. With new technologies, we are all witnesses to violations of human rights on our own television sets in the privacy of our own homes. If the images on the screen take us back to our land of origin, it is not unheard of that these images, these experiences we have been removed from, could have profound psychological effects on us. We are left with many questions, and a need to do something to set things right. We experience psychological distress. We must research other people's stories, understand their experiences and their pains, and give a new meaning to personhood, a state of being in the world with dignity. In this seminar we will study the history of Human Rights (i.e. The Declaration of Human Rights, Le Droit de L'Homme, the Code Noir, policies during slavery, and political inconsistencies during the Cold War) and contrast it to the memory of individual and community exposed in recent diaspora literature. We will interrogate the uses of psychological and physical terror in disabling communities and persons by dictators such as Duvalier and Trujillo, respectively, explore what it means to be a person, and consider what role literature plays in positing memory, exposing human cruelty, and recuperating people from the grips of trauma. We will also take into consideration the complexities of citizenship and national sovereignty with respect to international human rights. Readings will include: International Human Rights by Jack Donnelly; The Category of the Person, Anthropology, Philosophy and History edited by Michael Carrithers, Steven Collins, and Steven Lukes; The Body in Pain by Elaine Scarry; Trauma and Recovery by Judith Herman; Selections from Nunca Más, on torture in Latin America, Restavec by Jean-Robert Cadet; The Farming of Bones and Breath, Eyes, Memory by Edwidge Danticat; El Massacre se pasa a pie by Freddy Prestol Castillo; Los que falsificaron la firma de dios by Viriato Sención; General Sun, My Brother by Jacques Stephen Alexis; excerpts from Trujillo y Haiti (available in Spanish, French, and English) by Bernardo Vega; Papa Doc, The Truth About Haiti Today edited by Bernard Diederich and Al Burt; and excerpts from Peter Elsass' Strategies for Survival and Treating Victims of Torture and Violence. Films will be available in reserves, i.e., Raoul Peck's The Man By the Shore (L'homme sur le Quai). Class will be conducted in English, but reading in Spanish is necessary. Some films will be in French with English subtitles. Oral presentations and a final class paper will be expected.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 873. Seminar in the Modern Spanish Novel.

Section 001 Culture, History, Psychoanalysis: Spain from 1898 to 1992.

Instructor(s): Cristina Moreiras-Menor (moreiras@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class will focus on the way culture (literature, film, and thought) addresses the relation between modernity and its crises. We will analyze historical, social, and cultural crises, and how 20th century writers and directors deal with, for example, war and its aftermath, the construction of the Nation, immigration, subjectivity, transformations in citizenship, and women's issues. The course will center on the work of some of the most significant Spanish authors (Unamuno, Ortega y Gasset, Zambrano, Umbral, Goytisolo, Trías, Pérez Reverte, Marsé, Savater, Marías, Gopegui, among others) and directors (Saura, Villaronga, Almodóvar, Miró, de la Iglesia, etc.), as well as on influential theoretical readings (Freud, Lacan, Benjamin, Irigaray, Kristeva, etc.) on issues that underline the questions of modernity and postmodernism. Taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 895. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a Doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


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