College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Biological Anthropology


This page was created at 6:17 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


ANTHRBIO 467. Human Behavioral Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew F Richards (psupie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: A strong background in the natural sciences is assumed, including any two of the following courses: ANTHRBIO 161, 368; BIOLOGY 162; MCDB 404; EEB 494. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrbio/467/001.nsf

This lecture and lab course aims to presents a synthetic account of the evolution of human traits using an adaptationist approach. The large brains and powerful cognitive abilities of humans are viewed as adaptations to a co-evolving complex social environment, rather than as adaptations to a non-social environment (e.g., tool technology, hunting, extractive foraging), or side-effects of other "trends" (e.g., allometry), or the result solely of sexual selection for "good genes". In particular, humans have evolved to cooperate in complex ways — in order to compete with each other (as coalition against coalition) for resources, power, and ultimately reproduction. We also will cover the evolution of such associated physiological, psychological, and cultural phenomena as group living, concealed ovulation, sexuality and mate choice, male parental investment, infant altriciality, learning ability, emotional expression, reciprocity, "theory of mind", morality, war, business, science, and the demographic transition. We will read mostly from the primary scientific literature (in a course pack), both theoretical and empirical, in order to learn what evolutionary hypotheses have been applied to humans, how these hypotheses have been tested, and to think critically and scientifically about claims about humans. A weekly lab provides hands-on experience of selection, demography, life history, and games of cooperation. Evaluation will be via a midterm, several short essays, lab exercises, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRBIO 562. Human Nature.

Section 001 — Human Reproductive Ecology.

Instructor(s): Beverly I Strassmann (bis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ANTHRBIO 467 and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrbio/562/001.nsf

This is a graduate-level seminar on human reproductive ecology. We will read technical, scientific articles that assume a strong background in biology as well as evolutionary theory: Sample questions include: Why did menstruation and menopause evolve? Does menstrual synchrony exist? Does female sexuality change at the time of ovulation? What adaptations influence female fertility? What progress has been made in understanding male reproductive ecology? We will also explore diverse cultural practices that constrain female sexuality. Grading will be based on class participation and one paper. Permission of instructor is required for undergraduates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 564. Hominid Origins.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Milford H Wolpoff (wolpoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ANTHRBIO 351, 365 or 466, or an advanced course in evolution. Primarily for biological anthropology concentrators. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrbio/564/001.nsf

This course is about the origin of the human species and the life history of the earliest type of human — Australopithecus. It examines the ancestry of the hominids, the various theories of their origin, and aspects of australopithecine evolution such as their locomotion, behavior, adaptations, and taxonomy. Emphasis is placed on the application of evolutionary theory to species origins and mode of evolution, the biomechanical links of form to function, and the importance of the discovery of stone tools. The format includes lectures and a laboratory session. Evaluations are based on a paper, final exam, and laboratory tests and assignments. Prerequisite: ANTHRBIO 351, 365 or equivalent or more advanced course in evolution.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRBIO 566. Laboratory in Human Osteology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rachel Caspari (rcaspari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrbio/566/001.nsf

The course is concerned with the identification and interpretation of human skeletal remains. Emphasis is placed on both the individual and populational levels of interpretation. Topics include the basic biology of normal bone, pathology, and variation in form. Identification and reconstruction of fragmentary materials as well as reconstruction of populational characteristics (age, sex, life history data, metric description) are covered. It is specifically designed for archaeologists and biological anthropologists but also would be of use to pre-dental and pre-medical students who will take gross anatomy in the future. The course is limited to 20 students. Four scheduled hours, and additional laboratory time.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 570. Biological Anthropology: An Overview.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John C Mitani (mitani@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in anthropology. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrbio/570/001.nsf

This course will provide a survey of current research in biological anthropology. We will adopt evolutionary theory and the scientific method to investigate topics in human genetics, paleoanthropology, primate behavior, and human behavioral ecology. Whenever possible, links between the findings from research in biological anthropology and the other three subdisciplines of anthropology will be explored. The class will combine lectures by the instructor and discussion by students in a seminar format. The course will also feature occasional visits and lectures by leading biological anthropologists from other institutions. These lectures will furnish a means for students to learn what biological anthropologists do and highlight some of the major questions in the field today.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRBIO 665. Topics in Human Evolution.

Section 001 — The Creative Explosion and the Origin of Modernity.

Instructor(s): Milford H Wolpoff (wolpoff@umich.edu) , John D Speth (jdspeth@umich.edu), Stephen L Pastner (spastner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May be elected up to four times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrbio/665/001.nsf

This seminar is taught by a biological anthropologist, an archaeologist, and an ethnologist/artist. All these perspectives will be brought to bear on the issues around the florescence of creativity — artistic, technological, social-organizational, and cosmological — that occurred in some places with the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic. There will be an eclectic array of readings and active student participation. A previous course in any subfield of anthropology would be preferred.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 670. History of Biological Anthropology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles L Brace (clbrace@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Biological anthropology has a broad and diverse ancestry in the assumptions of a western European outlook concerning the nature of the peoples of the world. That outlook was particularly conditioned by the experiences and the traditions of interpretation of the European settlers of North America. America continues to support the bulk of the biological anthropologists of the world. For reasons that will be discussed, American perceptions were adopted and integrated into a systematic intellectual framework in France and not America. The circumstances of that integration precluded the incorporation of a Darwinian perspective. The Anglo-French entente during World War I brought a version of that framework back into the emerging ethos of professional anthropology in the English-speaking world. This fit comfortably with the continuing current of American assumptions concerning the reality and meaning of the concept of "race." It also bears on the fact that the outlook of evolutionary biology is largely missing from paleoanthropology. These manifestations of typological thinking continue to be applied to considerations of the fossil record and modern human biological variation in lieu of evolutionary expectations. The thinking of a sampling of biological anthropologists is examined to demonstrate the continuing absence of Darwinian expectations. Student evaluations will be based on a midterm, a final exam, and a term paper on a topic to be set in consultation with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 961. Research Practicum in Anthropology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: 18 hours or graduate standing; permission of instructor. (2-8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ANTHRBIO 962. Anthropological Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: 18 hours or graduate standing; permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ANTHRBIO 963. Survey of Literature on Selected Topics.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: 18 hours or graduate standing; permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ANTHRBIO 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate Standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ANTHRBIO 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Milford H Wolpoff (wolpoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate Standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRBIO 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


Undergraduate Course Listings for ANTHRBIO.


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This page was created at 6:17 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.


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