College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Cultural Anthropology


This page was created at 6:20 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


ANTHRCUL 409. Peoples and Cultures of the Near East and North Africa.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew J Shryock (ashryock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of anthropological approaches to the cultures of what is now called "the Middle East," a region extending from Morocco to Iran. Primary attention is given to Arabic-speaking, Muslim societies. We will examine enduring topics of interest, such as tribalism, kinship, gender, and Islam. We also will explore new problems (and styles of analysis) that call older interest into question. These include (trans)nationalism, mass culture, the political consequences of popular literacy, globalization, diasporas, and novel forms of ethnographic engagement with these topics. Finally, the course addresses the growing number of Middle Eastern communities that now live outside the region, with a special focus on Arabs in Detroit. Classes will include a mix of lecture and discussion, and readings will be drawn mostly from recent monographs. Grades will be based on two essays, with an additional short paper for graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 411 / CAAS 422. African Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

Prerequisites: Junior standing. CAAS 200 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Africa is considerably more important, more interesting, and certainly more complex than its popular image suggests. This course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of tropical (sub-Saharan) Africa. Topics covered include: the historical geography of Africa; pre-colonial and colonial roots of contemporary African state-societies; case studies of changing systems of kinship, marriage, family and gender relations; race, ethnicity, language, class and the dynamics of cultural, national and pan-African identity; religion, music, dance, and the arts in contemporary Africa; globalization and the challenge of African development. The course is open to both anthropology concentrators and non-concentrators. Grades are based on four 5-6 page, type-written, take-home papers, and contributions to class discussion. Film/videos shown in class when available.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 439. Economic Anthropology and Development.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to economic anthropology and development in rural, village-based, tribal, peasant, urbanizing and industrializing societies and cultures of the Third World: Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Middle East.

The FIRST PART reviews the nature of economic anthropology, its scope, objectives, basic concepts, theories, and methods of investigation. It discusses economic anthropology as it relates to conventional/development economics.

The SECOND PART examines anthropological (social science) perspectives on development and underdevelopment: progress, modernization, acculturation, socioeconomic growth.

The THIRD PART is concerned with specific case studies of problems of Third World development and underdevelopment: rural/urban poverty and inequality; women and development; international migration and globalization.

The course CONCLUDES with an overview of global issues in Third World development and underdevelopment in a post-cold war environment.

The course is recommended for anthropology concentrators and all students with serious interest in comparative cultures and Third World development and underdevelopment. Lecture/discussion format. Films and videos shown in class when available. Final grades based on three take-home papers and contributions to class discussion.

Basic texts: Lucy Mair, Anthropology and Development; and Polly Hill, Development Economics on Trial.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 455 / WOMENSTD 455. Feminist Theory and Gender Studies in Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/455/001.nsf

How are gender and power related? How do feminist theories affect the way reseach is carried out? This course analyzes gender as an integral dimension of social life in a variety of local, national, and global settings. It examines the conditions under which masculinity and femininity have been historically defined in differing cultures, and the institutional and discursive parameters within which men and women live and act. The class will combine lecture, discussion, and student presentations. It will draw on a variety of theoretical, ethnographic and visual materials relating to Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Students will make class presentations and write short commentaries, as well as a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 — Art and the Anthropological Imagination.

Instructor(s): Stephen L Pastner (spastner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Taught by an anthropologist/sculptor, this course focuses on the analysis and production of narrative visual art that derives from, and itself informs, more traditional anthropological and historical scholarship — an art genre commonly marginalized by both anthropologists and art-historians. The format of the course will combine lectures, group discussions, formal student presentations, and art practicum elements. Evaluation criteria will, for most students, include production of a work of art based on scholarly research, and a paper and presentation describing its genesis and development. However, for the resolutely "left brained" who may wish to forego the art project, additional writing assignments will be possible. There will also be participation in one of several collaborative class presentations and the possibility of one or more exams/quizzes. In addition to the required texts and "course pack", students electing to do an art project should anticipate some art-materials expenses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 — Indians and Anthropologists.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek (bameek@umich.edu), Lisa C Young (lcyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/458/003.nsf

"Indians and Anthropologists" explores the complex and at times contentious relationship between the indigenous peoples of North America and the anthropologists who study them. Our discussions begin with the very public and candid Native American critique of anthropology, which charges that anthropologists (called "anthros") are scientists whose perspectives are biased by colonial and often racist assumptions. This criticism originally took anthropologists by surprise because they saw themselves as preserving and promoting a greater understanding of Native American cultures. To contextualize this critique, we briefly review the history of anthropology in North America and examine changes in the field over the past three decades. Next, we examine topics that have recently sparked debate between Native communities and anthropologists, such as the legal controversy over the remains of "Kennewick Man," claims for cannibalism in the Ancient American Southwest, and representations of Native Americans in natural history museums. Finally, we will explore joint ventures and partnerships that have recently emerged between anthropologists and Native North America communities.

Students will learn about the on-going dialogue and debates between "Indians" and "Anthros" through lectures, student-led discussions, and articles by historians, Native authors, and anthropologists in all four subfields (cultural, biological, linguistic, and archaeology). Several guest speakers will provide their personal perspectives on working with Native American communities. Students will integrate information learned in the classroom to real-world experiences through three writing assignments, including attendance at the University of Michigan Pow Wow. The text for this course is Indians and Anthropologists: Vine Deloria, Jr. and the Critique of Anthropology edited by Biolsi and Zimmerman, which will be supplemented by articles in a course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 005 — Anthropology & North American Agriculture.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Fricke (tomf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Whether or not they've felt the scratch of straw under their collars at haying season or busted a combine's header against a fieldstone at harvest, many Americans shape a part of their identity in terms of an agricultural past. These stories may be personal and familial or part of a larger national narrative. This seems to be true even though fewer than two percent of Americans are engaged in farming today. This course will be an exploration of the connections among farming as a key cultural symbol for American self- and moral-construction, the political economy of agriculture, and such currents as rural radicalism and the new agrarianism. The course will include attention to anthropological approaches to agriculture, historical themes connecting American agriculture to the moral self, and their relevance to understanding contemporary farming life in the United States. Approaches will span the anthropology of work, of kinship, of place, and of moral systems. There will be an emphasis (but not a limitation) on ethnographic materials from the Midwest and Great Plains. The course is organized as a seminar incorporating a balance of lecture and discussion. Among the required texts are Wendell Berry's The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture (3rd edition, 1996, Sierra Club Books), Kathryn Dudley's Debt and Dispossession: Farm Loss in America's Heartland (2000, University of Chicago Press), and Catherine Stock's Rural Radicals: Righteous Rage in the American Grain (1996, Cornell University Press). In addition to these and other books, there will be readings available on a course web page and other readings handed out in class. Students will be graded on the basis of class participation and discussion, on two book review essays, and two essay tests for a total of about 25 pages of written work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 006 — Race and Displacement. Meets with CAAS 458.004.

Instructor(s): Damani Partridge (djpartri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In using autobiography, theoretical engagement, audio-visual representations and ethnographic accounts, this course will examine the meanings and modes of displacement by looking at racial formations in a global context. We will look at both the shifts of meanings and the everyday borrowings of "racial" categories, while examining discourses of difference and exclusion. What are the limits and possibilities of these discourses? What are the relationships between "race" and belonging? How does the politicization of racialized categories differ as one changes context, from post-socialism to post-colonialism to ethno-nationalism?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 502 / CCS 502 / HISTART 504. Humanistic Studies of Historical and Contemporary China.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (qning@umich.edu), Lydia Liu (lydialiu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/ccs/502/001.nsf

See CCS 502.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 527. Traditions of Ethnology II.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A continuation of Traditions in Ethnology I. It covers the period from about 1950 to the present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 545. Art, Culture and Visual Literacy.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Robertson (jennyrob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/545/001.nsf

Although anthropologists (but not just anthropologists) privilege the visual, their "visual literacy" is curiously undeveloped, in contradistinction to their well-developed verbal (and textual) literacy. Understanding images and visual, sensory phenomena and messages may seem to be an intuitive process but acquiring visual literacy is actually like learning a language with its own special alphabet, lexicon, and syntax. One might "know" a thing visually, but may not be able to "read" that same thing. IN addition to learning how to "read" visually, this seminar is also devoted to exploring anthropological and aesthetic theories of visual art, with a focus on art-making and art as a form of instrumental action (versus art as passive object). Among the salient issues explored are the psychology of patterns and perception; art and personhood; art and religious practices; style and culture; politics and art; gendering and sexing art; and artisanal economics. The seminar traverses the globe in exploring "case studies" from China (power and calligraphy); France and Italy (fascist visions); U.S.A. (gender politics of the WPA, class ideology and art); Mexico, Central America and South Asia (artisanal cooperatives); Japan (art and eugenics, and "cartoon" art); South Africa (apartheid, art and activism); and Australia (globalization of Aboriginal art), among others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 — Intersectionality and Women's Health: Ethnographic Approaches. Meets with HBEHED 656.001 & WOMENSTD 698.006.

Instructor(s): Marcia C Inhorn (minhorn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This interdisciplinary graduate seminar, open to students in public health, anthropology, and women's studies, is designed to explore in an in-depth fashion how the intersections of race/class/gender and other axes of "difference" (i.e., age, sexual orientation, disability status, immigrant status) affect women's health in the contemporary United States. In this course, recent feminist approaches to intersectionality and "multiplicity of oppressions" theories will be introduced. Weekly, student-led, feminist-oriented seminar discussions will revolve around twelve book-length ethnographic studies, which examine some aspect of intersectionality and women's health outcomes in the U.S. Through reading, thinking, talking, and writing about a series of ethnographic monographs, students in this course will gain broad exposure to a number of exigent women's health issues in the U.S., issues of ethnographic research design, and the interdisciplinary theorizing of feminist, (medical) anthropological, and public health scholars. Students will be graded on seminar participation, leadership of one seminar discussion, and a comparative written review of three books on women's health in the U.S.

This course is a meet-together, and HBHE (SPH) is the home department. Enrollment is limited, so students interested in taking the course must seek permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 — Sexological Theories: From Krafft-Ebing to Foucault. Meets with COMPLIT 750.001 and WOMENSTD 698.005.

Instructor(s): Gayle S Rubin (grubin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See COMPLIT 750.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 — Methods in the Ethnography Everyday Life.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Fricke (tomf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Most general discussions of method in cultural anthropology are awful. They tend toward a listing of techniques with no real sense of why you'd want to use them. This is a seminar intended to explore and practically discuss approaches to ethnographic work and representation that highlight those areas where documentary and ethnography converge. We will cover a range of materials circling around the notion of everyday life, the elements of story and narrative in ethnographic writing and their implications for what we do in the field, the ethics of fieldwork and representation, the implications of being a person studying persons, and more. This is partly a seminar in self-confidence but it won't ignore technique. Our common need to work in a concrete place, observe concrete things, and talk to real people implies a need to be familiar with the nuts and bolts of fieldwork along those shared lines (taking field notes, conducting open-ended interviews, and the like). But we'll justify our toolkit by discussion of prior themes that motivate, defend, and arise out of the whole enterprise of ethnographic fieldwork.

The reading and discussion materials are constructed along the lines of a sampler that moves back and forth between the general and the specific. Concrete examples from various ethnographies or ethnography-like writing will give us the proper grip on more general weekly themes. Seeing how a range of people have tried to convey the immediacy of human experience within more general discussions will help us to feel confident in our own experiments with experience.

Texts will include Robert Coles' Doing Documentary Work (Oxford University Press, 1997), James Agee and Walker Evans' Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (Houghton Mifflin, 1941), Howard Becker's Tricks of the Trade: How to Think About Your Research While You're Doing It (University of Chicago Press, 1998), John Van Maanen's Tales of the Field: On Writing Ethnography (University of Chicago Press, 1988), and 2-3 other books currently being selected — one of which will likely be John Berger's Keeping a Rendezvous (Pantheon, 1991). There will be a huge number of selections from longer works passed out in class. This is a discussion seminar. Be prepared to talk. Grades will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, very brief weekly 2-3 page reaction to readings essays, and a sequenced essay assignment involving ethnographic observation, vignette construction, and reelection.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 004 — Global Capitalism & Extractive Economies: Mining Ethnography.

Instructor(s): Stuart A Kirsch (skirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/558/004.nsf

This seminar considers the ethnography of mining from the classics of the African copper belt to more recent studies on capitalism, modernity, and globalization. The central concern is what economists call the "resource curse," the strong association of political regimes based on extractive economies with instability, violence, and poverty. We will also examine the related problems of labor, gender, migration, and environmental degradation. Criticism of the industry has generated new forms of "audit culture," the evolution of globalizing legal forms, analyses of the relationship between capital and science, and protests against the "state effects" of neoliberalism. Readings include Powdermaker's "Copper Town," Nash's "We Eat the Mines and the Mines Eat Us," Taussig's "The Devil and Commodity Fetishism," Ferguson's "Expectations of Modernity," Finn's "Tracing the Veins," Weiner & Rumsey's "Mining and Indigenous Lifeworlds," published articles, and select anthropological contributions to the vast "gray literature" on mining. Regular and informed participation, presentation, and independent research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 005 — Race as Power/Race as Mind.

Instructor(s): Lawrence A Hirschfeld (lhirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/558/005.nsf

Where does the notion of race come from? Do racial classifications differ fundamentally from other ways of cataloguing human population differences? Does the act of classifying people in itself necessarily produce prejudice and hierarchy? What does it mean to say that race is a social construction? What is the nature and scope of public and private representations of race? What are the best ways to interpreting these representations?

These are a few of the questions that this seminar will explore. Research on racial thinking generally has adopted one of two perspectives: A psychological perspective that focuses on the beliefs and attitudes that individual persons hold. Alternatively, race has been approached from an interpretive perspective that focuses on the social, cultural, and political dimensions of racial classification. These two perspectives reflect two distinct properties of racial thinking: race is both a category of mind and a category of power. As a category of mind race has been understood to be a function of general cognitive processes like perception, stereotyping, and category bias. Little effort has been invested in examination of specific nature of racial thinking or its social correlates. As a category of power, race has been understood in the context of the organization of inequitable distributions of resources and authority. This work typically focuses on the ways race functions within systems of power and authority and is articulated in specific systems of domination. Little effort has been invested in understanding the concept's psychological correlates, particularly their contribution to relations of power.

This seminar seeks to coordinate and integrate findings from both these perspectives, working to gain a more comprehensive understanding of race and racism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 006 — Semiotic Technologies.

Instructor(s): Matthew Hull (hullm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores semiotic technologies — ideational and material means for producing, interpreting, and regulating significance for particular ends. We will begin with readings of theoretical works central to the study of semiotic technologies drawn from anthropology, semiotics, science and technology studies, and history. The seminar will examine semiotic technologies as creations of new kinds of efficacy that change the conditions of possibility, especially for human subjects. We will consider theoretical issues with reference to a range of phenomena, including Sanskrit grammar, Chinese calligraphy, European manuscripts, books, modern government documents, ritual, and a variety of contemporary information and communication technologies. A major goal is to articulate the study of contemporary electronic technologies with the rich theoretical and empirical anthropological and historical literature on materiality, knowledge, and communication. Some background in semiotics or science and technology studies is helpful but not necessary. Requirements include brief weekly response papers, one presentation of readings, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 007 — Urban Anthropology.

Instructor(s): Janet Hart (janeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In 2000, RD Grillo wrote, expressing a not entirely idiosyncratic position: "Urban anthropology once had a bright future, but despite the valiant efforts (in different ways) of Leeds, Fox, Hannerz and Southhall, it is now moribund, if not defunct. I have no intention of resurrecting it! Indeed in the global context of the end of the millennium it is questionable whether the city remains an appropriate and unproblematic unit of social relations, if it ever was."

During the past decade, however, anthropologists from James Holston to Setha Low have presented strong arguments and effective models for the ethnographic study of cities, with Arjun Appadurai going so far as to claim that cities have trumped nations as the loci for the making of modern citizens. In this course, we will consider the shifting field of urban ethnography and its complicated lineage, which began in earnest with the work of the Chicago ethnographers at the turn of the 20th century. What characterizes life in an urban society? What are the common features and/or variations among cities situated in different cultural and historical contexts? The course is organized around two sets of concerns: first, the anthropology of cities — factors shaping the nature of urban life, the historical emergence of urban forms and forms of urbanism; and second, anthropology in cities, examining such themes as social networks, class, gender, idioms of identity and institutional configurations, with reference to specific ethnographic accounts. Evaluations will be based on insightful participation and a choice of take-home midterm and final, or a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 577. Language as Social Action.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ANTHRCUL 576. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/577/001.nsf

Develops a framework for viewing languages as a social, cultural, and political matrix, a form of action through which social relations, cultural forms, ideology, and consciousness are constituted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 632. Comparative Analysis of Kinship.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine current theoretical and methodological issues in the analysis of kinship, using case studies from Africa, Asia, Southeast Asia, Melanesia, Europe, and North America. This course will focus on the social processes through which people define, create, extend, limit, sever or transform their relatedness with others within and over generations. We will explore how people conceptualize who is, or is not, their own "kin" or "kind" and why; the moral imagination involved in working through the contradictory loyalties characterizing even the most intimate, small-scale relations; where, how and why people draw the lines between themselves and other forms of organic life; how generative relations are expressed in forms ranging from substances like blood, milk, or semen, to new reproductive technologies and genetic genealogies. In the Winter 2004 academic term, we will focus especially on the significance of places (houses, land, cities, etc.), and experiences of migrating and settling in and among them, in creating, shaping, containing, and transforming relationships over time.

Course requirements: This is a small, seminar-style course in which students can expect lots of reading for discussion in class and a major research paper, as well as one, perhaps more, oral presentation/s to the class based on the reading and on the research for the term paper. Grades will be based on the term paper, the presentation/s, and contributions to class discussions.

Readings: The required reading will include 8-10 books available at the Shaman Drum Bookstore (313 State St, tel: 662-7407) and a a course pack of articles available from Excel (1117 South University St, tel: 996-1500). The required books and course pack will also be on reserve in Shapiro Library.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 — Formatting Cultures: Modularity, Mainstreaming, and the Politics of Representation.

Instructor(s): Andrew J Shryock (ashryock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar deals with the business — with the art, craft, and politics — of rendering complex cultural materials in simplified forms that can be widely shared. In an age of mass mediation (and mass production), simplified renderings of this kind are necessary to the creation of "publics" and "public culture," domains in which identity formation and commodification merge and endlessly reconfigure each other. This process encourages "formatting culture," a practical discourse in which generic modules and formulas for representation are applied to diverse things — to peoples, places, belief systems, histories, ideologies, goods, and relationships — in ways that streamline them and allow them to be situated against shared (but often unacknowledged) backdrops. Formatting cultures produce inclusive systems of comparability in which difference can be recognized, managed, suppressed, and productively displayed.

Examples of "formatting culture" are everywhere. The nation-state, the citizen, the corporation, the community, private and public spheres: all are longstanding sites of modularity and disciplined simplifications. To create common points of reference, we will read influential studies that have attempted to historicize and contextualize these formatting sites. We will then shift our attention to contemporary efforts to format what is unformatted, what resists formatting, and what now demands it. We will study cases in which formatting, as a kind of work, is plainly visible, and we will try to understand how various formatting techniques are applied to materials, objects, ideas, and people who are not (yet) compatible. We will look closely at specific areas in which formatting work is done: museums and cultural programs, marketing firms and niches, NGOs, the interface of state policies and special communities (defined ethnically, racially, and by sexual preference), publics and counterpublics, and other settings in which identities are made to facilitate representation. We will examine the specialized knowledge that accumulates along the boundaries of the formatted and the unformattable, how this knowledge is essential to formatting, and why it can seldom become part of the public discourses and media of display formatting makes possible. This course of study will help us elucidate and think critically about the disciplinary power of the political, economic, and cultural mainstreams in relation to which formatting inevitably occurs.

Participants in the seminar will post weekly critiques of readings on a class listserv, lead class discussions, do research on a particular site of formatting culture, write a substantial essay based on this research, and present it to the class. Readings for the course include works by Jurgen Habermas, Benedict Anderson, Partha Chaterjee, Shelly Errington, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Annelise Riles, Michael Warner, Miranda Joseph, Julian Barnes, Arlene Davila, Elizabeth Povinelli, David Guss, Jean Baudrillard, Timothy Mitchell, David Whisnant, Charles Taylor, and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 — Evolutionary Epistemology. Meets with PSYCH 808.007 and NRE 639.117.

Instructor(s): Scott Atran (satran@umich.edu), Richard Nisbett

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See PSYCH 808.007.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 — Psychology and Anthropology of Terrorism. Meets with PSYCH 808.010.

Instructor(s): Scott Atran (satran@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See PSYCH 808.010.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 671. Workshop in Analytic Methods.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek (bameek@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ANTHRCUL 576 and Graduate Standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Workshop in ethnographic observation and analysis in linguistic anthropology. Designed to familiarize graduate students with the kinds of data used by linguistic anthropologists, and with the analytic approaches that are appropriate for specific problems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 675. Topics in Anthropological Linguistics.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001 — Multilingualism:Societies&Prac. Meets with ANTHRCUL 458.001 and LING 492.001/792.001.

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu) , Ann Lesley Milroy (amilroy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ANTHRCUL 576 or LING 411 and Graduate Standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/458/001.nsf

This seminar has two distinct components. The first involves a series of readings and discussions designed to introduce students to the study of societal multilingualism, including bilingualism. Although multilingualism is of interest to scholars working in many different disciplines and subfields, we shall approach the topic chiefly from the overlapping perspectives of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. A range of definitions and descriptions of bi- and multilingualism will be considered, and the associated phenomena of bidialectalism and diglossia discussed. Major topics covered will include language practices and patterns of language shift in migrant multilingual communities; language maintenance, language shift and language death. An important theme throughout will be language choice and language mixing practices of multilinguals, and the associated problematic distinction between code-switching and borrowing. We shall look particularly carefully at the pragmatic functions of code-switching, and assess some accounts of the ways in which speakers use the codes available to them as a conversational resource. We shall also consider how speakers conceive of the multilingual environment, the codes at their disposal, and the practices in which those codes are deployed.

The second part of the seminar is a research component. As a class project, we will conduct a pilot investigation of language use among Senegalese migrants in Southeast Michigan, with the aim of comparing migrants' linguistic repertoires with repertoires reported for Senegal itself. Students will be able to participate in a manner consistent with their intellectual goals and interests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 760 / PSYCH 689. Culture and Cognition.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001 — [2 credits].

Instructor(s): Lawrence A Hirschfeld (lhirsch@umich.edu), Shinobu Kitayama (kitayama@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology and permission of instructor. (2-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/689/001.nsf

This seminar is part of an interdisciplinary program initiated by the Departments of Anthropology and Psychology. The seminar includes both students and faculty. In it we will explore how the cultural environment influences, and is influenced by, reasoning and other psychological processes. The cognitive revolution has been based upon the tacit assumption that all humans have the same basic cognitive structures and functions, and that cultures and other social contexts contribute only peripherally important content differences. Anthropologists have long argued that both the content and function of knowledge may be strongly linked to the types of problems that a given culture or social group must habitually solve. The seminar will focus on ways in which cognition may be culturally mediated, socially situated, and contingent on historical forces. Recent research in the field will be presented and discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 777. Linguistic Anthropology Laboratory.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Anthropology or a Related Discipline. (1-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 825 / HISTORY 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTORY 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ANTHRCUL 957. Research Practicum in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ANTHRCUL 958. Anthropological Research.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ANTHRCUL 959. Survey of Literature on Selected Topics.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ANTHRCUL 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Advanced Doctoral student. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ANTHRCUL 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


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