College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies


This page was created at 6:29 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


AAPTIS 404. Advanced Modern Standard Arabic II.

Arabic: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Oleg Redkin (olred@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 403. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/aaptis/404/001.nsf

This course exposes student to a variety of reading and speaking activities, listening comprehension passages, and controlled and free writing exercises. Through this exposure, students learn to analyze and use the Arabic language in step with the linguistic realities of contemporary Arab societies. This course equally emphasizes the four primary language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening). Students are expected to work independently, with a classmate, or in a group on projects (depending on the nature of the task at hand). Grammar and vocabulary receive their due share in this course. Targeted language in this course is Standard Arabic, not colloquial.

In class, students will hold discussions, participate in role-playing activities, read and analyze texts, and communicate using the target language regularly. Outside of class, students are provided with regular homework exercises, expected to write journals, prepare for the following class, and listen to passages. To reinforce what is learned from the textbook, the instructor will supplement the required text with reading materials that relate to the topics covered in the book.

This is the second course of Modern Standard Arabic at the intermediate level. Therefore, students registered for this course are expected to have completed at least two years of Modern Standard Arabic at the elementary and intermediate levels and one term at the advanced level (or their equivalent) prior to their enrollment.

Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to read and write several paragraphs on familiar and less-familiar topics. Also, they are expected to describe and narrate in different time frames, provide a short presentation (perhaps two, depending on the size the class) on a topic of interest, and be able to listen and comprehend news reports that include factual information, narrations, descriptions, and short lectures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 411. Classical Arabic Grammar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Oleg Redkin (olred@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Three years of Standard Arabic language study. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The main objective of this course is to create a clear systematic picture of classical Arabic grammar. In addition to presenting the basic methodology of classical Arabic grammar, students will be introduced to methods applied to the study of classsical Arabic grammar by Western grammarians. Namely W.Wright's book "A Grammar of the Arabic Language", which summarized almost all Arabic grammatical rules. Along with the basic grammatical rules we will examine various grammatical definitions such as the forms of the triliteral verb, the strong verb, the weak verb, nouns (masdars, adjectives, participles, etc.), the declension of nouns, demonstrative pronouns suffixes, and prepositions. Special attention will be paid to Arabic syntax.

Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to know and understand the basic grammatical rules of the Classical Arabic Language.

Evaluation: Attendance at lectures and participation in class discussion; periodic quizzes, midterm and final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 459. Ottoman Turkish Culture.

Turkish Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gottfried Hagen (ghagen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Taught in English. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the Turko-Islamic élite and popular culture of the Ottoman Empire. The course approaches its subject within the broader context of Islamic culture on the one hand, and the specific geographical and social conditions of the Ottoman world on the other. After a theoretical unit on the significance of cultural history, the course will give a brief framework of political and institutional history. One major unit will be devoted to the social spaces in which this culture unfolds, and to human networks which sustain it: The court, the religious institutions, economic activities, the family. The second major part will discuss expressions of this culture, beginning with the Ottoman manifestations of Islam as the primary point of reference of an Ottoman identity, and then moving to literature, arts, and material culture. The final part is designed to emphasize the diachronic dynamics in order to avoid an "orientalist" static picture. Therefore the internal and external notions of a "classical age" and its implications will be discussed critically, while a last unit will be devoted to westernization as a specific and important strain of modernization in the Near East. Textbook: Suraiya Faroqhi: Subjects of the Sultans, London; New York: I.B. Tauris, 2000.

Requirements: Regular classroom participation and contribution to discussions (20%); for graduate students a term paper no less than 3000 words; for undergraduates a book report no less than 2000 words (40%); midterm & final (40%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

468. Islamic Law.

Islamic Studies and Near Eastern History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sherman A Jackson

Prerequisites: Taught in English. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 475. Rumi and the Great Persian Mystical Poets.

Persian-Iranian Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Gernot L Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Taught in English. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The 13th-century Persian poet Jalaloddin Rumi was the leading figure in Persian mystical poetry, who fundamentally influenced Persian writing poets and authors from the regions of the Ottoman Empire to the Indian subcontinent and Central Asia, and through literary and mystic circles thoroughly shaped and continues to shape the spiritual aspects of the Persiantate world, and the Islamic world at large, to this day. While Rumi was always well known in western spiritual circles, recent translations and studies of Rumi and his fellow mystical poets, particularly in English, have led to a phenomenal increase in public interest in them, to a degree that Rumi has become a top seller in America, which includes not only books but also a large variety of other mediums, and spiritual workshops. This course is an introduction to the Classical Persian mystical poets through translations. We will read selections from Rumi, Rabe'e, Mahsati, Sana'i, Attar, Hafez, and Jami, and place each of them in the context of their own time and place. Through close readings and explication, we will learn to appreciate their poetic art and imagery. Students with knowledge of Persian will study the texts in the original. At the same time, students will be introduced to major tenets of Sufism as reflected in the visions of these Persian poets, and their role in society. The course will include regular brief writing assignments, four quizzes, and a term project explicating an individual poem, or poet, or topic (10 pp. limit), to be presented in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 488. History of Arabic Literature in English.

Arabic Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Trevor Legassick (tleg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Taught in English. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The texts for this course will be materials in English translation. Introductory lectures will briefly describe the essential features of the Arabic language and the cultural and geographic area to which it gives expression. Readings and discussions will progress in chronological order from pre-Islamic to modern times. The odes of the poets of pre-Islamic Arabia and their roles in their society will be discussed. The fables of Bidpai, translated from Persian by Ibn al-Muqaffa and encompassing moralistic tales of Kalila and Dimna, will be seen to mark the introduction of prose in Arabic. The Qur'an and the biographical literature relating to the life and personality of the Prophet will be examined in detail. Excerpts from both the poetry and the prose of the classical period, including reference to the early Arab geographers and scientists will illustrate the values and concerns of Arab-Islamic civilization. The Arabian Nights, although introduced into popular Arabic culture towards the end of the Baghdad caliphate from eastern origins, will be seen to exemplify many aspects of Arab culture over extended periods of time and place. The contact and clash between Arab and Western cultures since the early 19th century will be seen to have given rise to new forms of literary expression in contemporary Arabic literature.

Regular class attendance and participation in discussions. Presentation of essays to the class. Five essays will be required and will give evidence of close readings of the assigned texts and the use of supplementary materials.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AAPTIS 491. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 — Travel Literature in Central Asia.

Instructor(s): Ron Sela

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course charts the discovery and exploration of Central Asia by its many visitors-adventures, pilgrims, geographers, missionaries, merchants in disguise, and diplomats and prisoners of wars-from the eighth through the nineteenth centuries. The numerous testimonies left by those visitors will serve as a point of departure for our own exploration of the history of this fascinating but under-studies region.

The course focuses on reading primary sources (in the original English or translated from Chinese, Arabic, Persian, Hebrew, Turkish, Latin, German and Russian) which, in addition to underscoring Central Asia's pivotal role as a crossroads of civilizations, will also allow us to evaluate travel logs, diaries, memoirs, and mission reports as sources for the study of (Central Asian) history. We will wonder about the common grounds that modern-day historians and medieval tourists may share, and also introduce the potential unanimity and contrast between inside and outside sources. No pre-requisites. The course grade will be based upon contribution to class discussion (20%), a course assignment (20%), and two major examinations [a midterm (30%) and a final (30%)]. We will use a course packet as the required text.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 491. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 002 — Islamic Movement in a Comparative Perspective. Meets with MENAS 491.001, REES 405.001 and ASIAN 492.001.

Instructor(s): Alexander D Knysh (alknysh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See MENAS 491.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 492 / HISTORY 492 / GEOG 492. Shaping the Globe: Geography and Cartography in the Premodern Middle East & Europe.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gottfried Hagen (ghagen@umich.edu), Michael David Bonner

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the ways in which the world was understood and represented by different cultures, especially Muslim and Christian, over a long period of dramatic change that began with the reordering of the world by two new religions (Christianity and Islam) and culminated in the discovery of two continents (the Americas) and the displacement of the earth by the sun at the center of the cosmos (the Copernican Revolution). Some subjects to be investigated are: (1) how Christianity and Islam reshaped the ancient cosmology and geography of the ancient Greeks; (2) how each culture represented its own physical and moral environment through geographic writing and cartographic representation; (3) how geographic knowledge was developed and transmitted within and across cultures. A primary goal of the course is to show the ways in which geography, which shapes both political and mental boundaries, can provide a key to cultural understanding. We hope to bridge boundaries between disciplines (humanistic vs. "hard" science), media (image vs. text), cultures (Christian vs. Muslim/ European vs. Middle Eastern); and historical periods (Late Antiquity, Middle Ages, Early Modern Era). Readings of primary sources in translation and secondary literature will be made available through a course website. Regular attendance, participation in discussions, short bi-weekly assignments, and a final research paper will determine students' success in this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 495 / WOMENSTD 471 / HISTORY 546 / RELIGION 496. Gender and Politics in Early Modern Islam.

Islamic Studies and Near Eastern History

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Students should preferably have had one course in Islamic Studies. Taught in English. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The general aim of the course is to understand gender roles in Islam, both from a legal and religious perspective, as well as from behind the veil and the walls of royal harems. An introduction to Muslim understandings of gender and sex, first, through a survey of those sacred texts (Quran & Hadith) that came to define gender as well as the roles and mores of women and men in their relationships. Sexuality and the erotic will then be studied through other forms of popular Islamic literature such as "belles lettres" and mystical poetry. Finally, gender participation in the political and cultural life of the Safavi, Ottoman and Mughal courts shall be explored to view the interplay between theory and practice in early modern Islamdom. Weekly readings and preparation for class discussions. A midterm and final exam. One final research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 502. Advanced Arabic Readings in Special Subjects.

Language Courses

Section 001 — Taught in Arabic.

Instructor(s): Raji M Rammuny (raram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 501. Taught in Arabic. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is open for advanced students who plan to use Arabic for academic and research purposes. It follows content-based, learner-centered methodology. Students select the topics in which they are interested, read 15-20 pages every week before class, and then prepare written summary reports to be presented in class followed by discussion. This course aims to develop analytical study skills, including critical reading and listening, as well as effective writing and oral presentation. Grades will be based on weekly written reports, class attendance and participation, a final group project, and an oral interview. Special features: Course taught entirely in Arabic, ocassional lectures delivered by guest speakers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 531. Reading Modern Arab Authors in Arabic.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anton Shammas (antons@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 501. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course (offered alternately with AAPTIS 569, Modern Arabic Poetry, every Winter) is meant to introduce students of modern Arabic literature to the sheer pleasure of reading, discussing, and writing about a text in the original language. A special emphasis will be put on styles, strategies, and modes of narration, and on the literary and cultural contextualizations of a specific genre. The selected texts, in the course pack, will include novels, short stories, personal narratives, and critical essays, written by modern Arab authors in the Levant and North Africa in the last decade. Recent theories of narrative, and issues of gender and post-colonialism, also will be addressed. The selected texts will be assigned for reading and analysis, at an individual as well as a group level. At the individual level, each student will be asked to focus on a specific text of her or his choice, and present it in class. A substantial term-paper, in Arabic, is due toward the end of the term.

Prerequisite: AAPTIS 501 (if not a native speaker).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 553. Modern Turkish Readings.

Turkish: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gerdines Johannes van Schaaik

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 252 or 255. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Since this course is part of the departmental sequence in modern Turkish, admission to it is dependent on satisfactory completion of AAPTIS 252 or its equivalent as determined by the instructor. It is designed to further develop reading and comprehension competence in a variety of modern Turkish styles; newspaper and learned articles, political tracts, government publications, etc. The method of instruction is through recitation including preparation, reading, and oral or written translation of texts in class or at home with discussion of grammar, style, and content. Students are evaluated on their class preparation, a midterm, and a final examination. Among the texts used are A. Tietze's Advanced Turkish Reading and a collection of photocopied materials.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 561. Modern Arabic Fiction.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Trevor Legassick (tleg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 403 or reading knowledge of Arabic. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Selected examples of contemporary imaginative prose writing, such as short and long fiction and drama, will be studied. Readings will be in Arabic, and class discussions will be in English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 580 / HISTART 581. Islamic Architecture: Continuity and Innovation.

General AAPTIS

Section 001 — Safavid Iran (1501 to 1722).

Instructor(s): Sussan Babaie (sbabaie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 285. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTART 581.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

AAPTIS 584. Persianate History Through Political and Cultural Texts.

Persian-Iranian Literature and Culture in Persian

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Advanced reading knowledge of Persian. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The object of the course is to familiarize students of Iranian and Turkic history with a variety of genres of writings emanating from their shared Persianate cultural spheres. Geographically, it shall scrutinize "texts" from Anatolia, Iraq, Iran, Central Asia and India, those very lands in which Persian became the hegemonic language of politics and literature in the medieval and early modern ages (11-17th centuries). It analyses mediums through which the Persian language became the vehicle for continuity of Pre-Islamic Indo-Iranian conceptions of history, cosmos, kingship, spirituality, and social stratification. The choice demonstrates how the Islamic synthesis between Arab, Persian, and Turko-Mongol traditions are objectified in these particular genres. The following genres shall be studied: court chronicles, "Mirrors of princes," biographies of poets, hagiographies, local histories, religious poetry, disputations and epics, chancellery documents, such as land grants, firmans and diplomatic correspondence. Some readings shall be from manuscripts to introduce the student to paleography. Secondary scholarship will be assigned to place the texts within their wider historical contexts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 587 / HISTORY 531. Studies in Pahlavi and Middle Persian.

Persian-Iranian: Pre-Islamic Iran

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot L Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a language course that offers a hands-on introduction to Middle Persian, the literary language of two world religions, Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism, and of the small corpus of the Middle Persian inscriptions of the Sasanian dynasty (224-651 CE). The course has no prerequisites, and is open for interested students in Iranian and Near Eastern Studies, linguistics, history, comparative religion, and literature. From early on in the course, the study of grammar and of the writing systems will be accompanied by the study and discussion of selected text passages in Zoroastrian Middle Persian, known as Pahlavi, and in Manichaean Middle Persian. There will be regular assignment, a midterm, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 591. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 — Classical Persian Poetry and literary texts.

Instructor(s): Yashar Afshar (afshar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an advanced reading course in Persian classical poetry and literary texts. We will read selections from the early Persian-Dari poets such as Rodaki, Abu Sakor-e, Manocehri-ye, Farroki-ye Siistani and Ferdo si (Fardausi) Tusi. We will also read selections from old "literary-history" types, such as Cahar Maqale-ye Nezami-ye Arozi. The aim is not only becoming familiar with the early Persian poets with more of "worldy" content of their poetry and the grand epic of Sah-naneh of Ferdo si, but their language, stylistics, and world view. This indeed is the first part (A) of this reading and study course. The second part (B) will concentrate on mainly Sufi Poets. Recommended for graduates with three years Persian or heritage students with at least High School education. One after-midterm presentation and one final paper is required. The topics of presentations and papers will be discussed and decided in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 592. Seminar in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 — Constructions of Collective Memory and Identity: Readings in Theory and Practice.

Instructor(s): Carol B Bardenstein (cbardens@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/aaptis/592/001.nsf

In this course, we examine a selection of theoretical works on the construction of collective memory, cultural memory, and collective identification and affiliation. Some of our focus will be on the collective configurations associated with the "nation" and nationalism, with accompanying constructions, interrogations, and subversions of national myths. Considerable emphasis will also be placed on modes of collective memory and identity formation other than the national, including but not limited to those emerging in contexts of collective displacement, diaspora, exile, trauma, catastrophe, as well as hybridization, minority configurations, second generation and "post-memory" formation, and collective memory formations around food, music, landscape, etc. (Halbwachs, Nora, Casey, Lowenthal, Connerton, Kirmayer, Hirsch, Schama, Kirmayer, Spitzer, Huyssen, and others).

Against the backdrop of the body of theoretical literature on this topic, we will examine a selection of primary works (novels, short stories, memoirs, films, a range of popular cultural material) and secondary works that articulate and analyze collective memory and identity in very specific historical and cultural contexts. Approximately half of the particular contexts or "examples" analyzed, selected by the professor, will focus on discourses of collective memory and identity from a range of Middle Eastern, Mediterranean and Jewish collective contexts, including but not limited to those articulated in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust. The other half will be drawn from the specific research interests of the students in the seminar (based on texts selected from their area of research in consultation with the instructor).

The seminar meets once a week for three hours in seminar/discussion format. Students will be required to write one in-depth research paper for this course, and to give 1-2 in-class seminar presentations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 653 / POLSCI 653. Proseminar in Middle East Politics.

Islamic Studies and Near Eastern History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Tessler (tessler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See POLSCI 653.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 798. Directed Graduate Readings.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

AAPTIS 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate Standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AAPTIS 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for AAPTIS.


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