College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Communication Studies


This page was created at 6:18 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


COMM 441. Independent Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of department. (3-4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for credit. COMM 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits. A maximum of three credits of COMM 441 and 442 may be included in a communications studies concentration. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. Must be arranged with a Communication Studies faculty member and approved by the Department. A maximum of 3 credits from COMM 441 or 442 may apply to the concentration requirements (additional credit may be applied to the general bachelor's degree requirements). COMM 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined maximum of 8 credits. An application form is available in the Department or online.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

COMM 442. Independent Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of department. (3-4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for credit. COMM 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits. A maximum of three credits of COMM 441 and 442 may be included in a communications studies concentration. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. It is a course of study designed for original, individualized student research under the direction of faculty supervisor. Must be arranged with a Communication Studies faculty member and approved by the Department. A maximum of 3 credits from COMM 441 or 442 may apply to the concentration requirements (additional credit may be applied to the general bachelor's degree requirements). An application form is available in the Department or online.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

COMM 453. The Media in U.S. History.

Section 001 — Communication Studies concentrators only. Meets with COMM 453.002.

Instructor(s): Derek W Vaillant (dvail@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/comm/453/001.nsf

See COMM 453.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 453. The Media in U.S. History.

Section 002 — Meets with COMM 453.001.

Instructor(s): Derek W Vaillant (dvail@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/comm/453/001.nsf

This course places the development of American mass media in historical perspective. It surveys the evolution of the mass media from colonial times to the present, focusing on the development of contemporary forms: the newspaper, magazine, broadcasting, and motion picture. Changes in the structure of the media are examined in connection with historical and economic trends in American society. While there are no specific prerequisites, a general grounding in American history is recommended.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 454. Media Economics.

Section 001 — Communication Studies concentrators only. Meets with COMM 454.002.

Instructor(s): Zhaoxu Yan (zyan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/comm/454/001.nsf

See COMM 454.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 454. Media Economics.

Section 002 — Meets with COMM 454.001.

Instructor(s): Zhaoxu Yan (zyan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/comm/454/001.nsf

This course examines economic theory and its applications to media systems. Focuses on problems in the economics of the information industry, including market structure, concentration of ownership, pricing policies, product differentiation, advertising behavior, and economic performance. Attention given to the interaction of economics, media practices, and technologies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 699. First-Year Research Project.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, Instructor permission. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are required to begin a research project during their first year with the goal of completing it by the end of the fall term their second year. The project must be written up in the form of an article suitable for submission to a journal although publications is not an explicit part of the requirement. During the second year, the student will present the results of the project to the program proseminar.

First-year students are assigned an initial advisor with whom to work. The first-year project may be conducted collaboratively with that faculty member and such collaborative research is strongly encouraged. However, students may conduct more independent projects or collaborate with other faculty members if they wish.
Students will begin discussing the First-Year Research Project with their advisor in the fall term of their first year. They will register for the First-Year Research Project (CS 699) with the faculty member with whom they are collaborating during both the winter academic term of their first year and the fall academic term of their second year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

COMM 774. Media Institutions.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): W Russell Neuman (rneuman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Understanding the economics of mass media industries is the first important step toward comprehending how media institutions operate and how they are affected by ever changing economic trends, technological advances and the public policies enacted towards them. This course introduces students to a range of economic principles and concepts used in explaining the market structure, behavior and performance of mass media industries. The course is organized around a selective list of media industries — newspaper, film/home video, broadcast television, cable television and the Internet. Within each industry, we study relevant economic models; examine how consumer demand, technology and government policies interact to affect market structure and industry behavior. Finally, we will discuss the economic, technological and political forces changing the industry. After completing this course, students will be able to apply basic economic concepts and analytical tools to explain media industry behaviors, evaluate business strategies of media firms and assess the merits of public policies toward the media industries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 783. Research Methods II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan J Douglas

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/comm/810/002.nsf

This seminar is the second part of the two-part research methods and design series. This course involves a comprehensive review of the argument for good measurement. Students will survey several practical measurement techniques that are common among communications researchers. In addition, existing datasets will be explored in order to get hands-on training in quantitative data analysis including internal reliability, scaling, factor analysis, and other measurement techniques. The course focuses on the relationship between conceptualization and measurement, giving students the opportunity to begin thinking about the measurement techniques that are relevant to concepts of interest to them.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 799. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

COMM 810. Seminar in Communication.

Section 001 — Policies for Changing Economics of Knowledge. [3 credits]. Meets with PUBPOL 750.002 and SI 512.001.

Instructor(s): Brian George Kahin (kahin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-4). May be elected up to five times for credit.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/comm/810/001.nsf

The transfer of knowledge to the world at large is an essential university function. Traditionally this has been done through teaching, publication, and a variety of technology transfer mechanisms, including the licensing of patents. Developments in information technology, especially the growth of the Internet and the World Wide Web, are creating new models for generating, ordering, and disseminating knowledge. These new options raise expectations for enhanced transfer of knowledge across barriers of space and time. Some developments, such as open source licensing, seem to depart radically from traditional practice. This unsettled environment challenges academic policies and strategies for managing knowledge under rules and licenses, just as it has challenged intellectual property law and policy at national and international levels. How aggressively should the academy investigate new and emerging options? Answering this question may require a deeper understanding of economics of knowledge, including the expanding reach and capabilities of codified knowledge. Can better exploitation of codified knowledge leverage the university as a source of human and social capital and as a regional driver of economic development? What can universities do, directly or indirectly, to accelerate and broaden the transfer and use of knowledge? What tradeoffs do they face? Traditional models may remain adequate in many cases, while new tools and techniques should make it easier to tailor practice to changing conditions and circumstances. What factors and principles should inform and motivate the practice of transfer and dissemination? How can faculty and researchers be engaged effectively in determining and implementing strategy and policy? How can experience and insight contribute to public understanding of the nature of knowledge, to the shared norms and rules that encourage production, distribution, and use of knowledge, and to the academy's sense of stewardship?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor

COMM 810. Seminar in Communication.

Section 002 — Studying Mass Media, 1970-2000. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Susan J Douglas (sdoug@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-4). May be elected up to five times for credit.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/comm/810/002.nsf

The purpose of this seminar is to review the theoretical and methodological developments in qualitative media studies since the 1970s, and to link those developments to your own analysis of a particular medium, its content and/or its audiences. We will learn about the historical method in media studies, how neo-Marxist approaches can inform media studies, examine new work in visual analysis, study textual analysis, and review recent work and debates in audience ethnographies. In several of these areas we will read recent exemplars of different approaches. Students will learn how to frame research questions, and will be expected to develop their own archive suitable for researching and addressing a topic of your own choosing. Students may formulate their own topic/question, or choose among those offered below. For Communication Studies students, this class can serve as your advanced methodology seminar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor

COMM 810. Seminar in Communication.

Section 003 — The Meta-Analytic Review. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Brad J Bushman (bbushman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-4). May be elected up to five times for credit.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/comm/810/003.nsf

A research review is conceptualized as a scientific inquiry involving five stages that parallel those of primary research. The five stages are: (a) problem formulation, (b) data collection, (c) data evaluation, (d) analysis and interpretation, and (e) public presentation. Hands on experience in conducting a research review including the use of meta-analytic procedures to analyze the data.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor

COMM 810. Seminar in Communication.

Section 004 — Black Publics, Black Audiences. [3 credits]. Meets with CAAS 558.005.

Instructor(s): Squires

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-4). May be elected up to five times for credit.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 558.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

COMM 810. Seminar in Communication.

Section 005 — Networked Society. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Harmeet Sawhney

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-4). May be elected up to five times for credit.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar we will examine the rise of the networked society and the physical infrastructure that undergirds it. We will start by discussing the social, economic, and cultural forces that set into motion the movement towards the networked society. We will then analyze how large-scale networks, the physical infrastructure of a networked society, are conceptualized and created. How metaphors shape our thoughts? How are investment decisions made when there is so much uncertainty about future demand? Why are the hierarchical networks getting transformed into flatter structures? After examining the infrastructure development process, we will discuss the new modes of social organization made possible by large-scale networks. Why are we seeing the advent of networked organizations and other networked configurations? How are these configurations different from the earlier ones? What is their impact on our everyday lives? We will approach these issues via readings from diverse disciplines -- economics, political science, public affairs, cultural geography, regional planning, cultural studies, history, information science, education, and communications. You are most welcome to make your own contribution to the brew!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

COMM 900. Preliminary Examination Preparation.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Pre-doctoral standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

When all course requirements have been met and the First Year Research Project has been satisfactorily completed, the student may begin preparation for the three preliminary written examinations. Students can register for an individual study course, CS 900: Preliminary Examination Preparation, for up to six credit hours. This course is taken under the supervision of the faculty advisor and is meant to give the student an opportunity to review the readings that will be covered on the exams. Students are expected to complete their preliminary exams by the end of their third year. NOTE: Students must be registered during the term they take a preliminary exam. If an exam is completed while a student is not registered, the graduate school will NOT advance the student to candidacy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

COMM 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

COMM 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for COMM.


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This page was created at 6:18 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.


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