College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Comparative Literature


This page was created at 6:24 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


COMPLIT 436. Comparative Studies in Drama.

Section 001 — Jealousy.

Instructor(s): Anne Carson

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will examine the structures, uses and representations of this most operatic of emotions — jealousy real and metaphorical, erotic and religious, in the body and beyond the body, in humans and in gods — and will culminate in a staged reading (by the class) of an opera libretto called Decreation. Authors to be read include Sappho, Homer, Marguerite Porete, and Simone Weil.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 490. Comparative Cultural Studies.

Section 001 — Buddhism & Romanticism. Meets with ENGLISH 482.002.

Instructor(s): Santiago Colas (scolas@umich.edu), Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We envisage this course as an exploration of the overlap between Romanticism's critique of (Enlightenment) rationality (with special attention to its efforts to undermine, set aside, or volatilize the subject-object binary: e.g., Hegel, Marx, Marcuse, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley) AND, the uniquely pre/post/ or non-critical thought-style and presuppositions of Buddhism. Although the body of scholarly work that studies this conjuncture (e.g., work by Antonio Negri, Niklas Luhmann, Eleanor Rosch, Francisco Varela) is powerful and productive, the course will focus on primary texts and on practices of knowing (as in, poetry, fiction). Course requirements will consist of weekly short exercises rather than the standard critical/research essay, and the overall purpose of these assignments is to advance understanding of the models of knowing/being (i.e., philosophical models) discussed in class, and to cultivate the students' self-awareness with respect to their own intellectual/social/psychic formation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 490. Comparative Cultural Studies.

Section 002 — Stoicism: Fate, Uncertainty, Persistence. Meets with INSTHUM 511.001.

Instructor(s): Denise Riley

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ours is a world of deepening uncertainty and political malaise, where the old kinds of optimism for a steadily improving future are impossible to sustain. Stoicism offers a hope of enduring with dignity; it may indicate how without having recourse to religious faith, we can find stability in a relativistic world. We will investigate Stoicism as a system of ideas about living well, and as a set of linked understandings of the natural world, and we'll think about how these are, or could be, played out today as well as in historical terms. How can uncertainty be tolerated, or even enjoyed? We'll look at gambling, for instance, as a kind of protected risk-taking. Our concerns range from early Stoical understandings of the physical universe and its ideas of atomism, materialism, and the nature of space, to some Renaissance literary rereadings of Stoicism, to Nietzsche as a stoical moralist, and to modern reworkings of Stoical philosophy and ethics within postwar critical thought, including that of the philosophers Foucault and Deleuze.

Our core reading will be:

Lucretius, On the Nature of the Universe Marcus Aurelius, Meditations ; The Epicurus Reader ; Epictetus, The Discourses , and as a commentary, Pierre Hadot, Philosophy as a Way of Life .

[Knowledge of Latin and Greek is certainly not expected.]

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 601. Contemporary Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anton Shammas (antons@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The second part of a two-part introductory sequence to Comparative Literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor

COMPLIT 698. Directed Reading in Comparative Literature.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

COMPLIT 750. Seminar: Topics in Comparative Literature.

Section 001 — Sexological Theories: From Krafft-Ebing to Foucault. Meets with ANTHRCUL 558.002 and WOMENSTD 698.005.

Instructor(s): Gayle S Rubin (grubin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine changes in sexological theories by tracking shifts in concepts of sexual perversion from early sexology in the late 19th century through the emergence of social construction paradigms in the mid 1970s. The dominant perspectives in late 19th century sexological literature saw most sexual variety (particularly any non-procreative, non-marital, non-heterosexual sexual activity) as perversion, and as forms of diseased desire. These assumptions have continued to shape many contemporary notions of sexual variation, and to privilege questions of causality and disease etiology of sexual variation. Nonetheless, even in early sexology, other frameworks for thinking about diverse sexualities are evident. We will trace the increasing salience of non-pathological, socially informed, and diversity based concepts of differences of sexual preference and practice. The course will start with some consideration of the relationships between early sexological taxonomies of perversion and contemporaneous obsessions with racial classification. It will examine the work of pioneering sexologists such as Richard von Krafft-Ebing, Havelock Ellis, and Magnus Hirschfeld, as well as the influence of such figures on Sigmund Freud and early psychoanalysis. Readings will then turn to Alfred Kinsey, the impact of the sociology of "deviance" in the 1960s, and finally, social histories of sexuality and social construction theories of sexuality in the 1970s. Readings in this later section may include John Gagnon and William Simon, Jeffrey Weeks, Carole Vance, and Michel Foucault.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 751. Topics in Comparative Literature.

Section 001 — Writing the Edge between Scholarly Authority and Personal Engagement.

Instructor(s): Christi Ann Merrill (merrillc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/complit/751/001.nsf

How can you write your conscience into your work in a manner that is rigorous? What rhetorical tricks will encourage your reader to redefine the standards of your discipline(s) to suit your greater purposes? How may you tread paths of discourse available to you already without then conveyer-belting straight to the Narrow-Narrow Land you are trying to avoid? This seminar will combine discussion and workshop to help you rethink the possibilities of the essay, as a way of encouraging you to experiment writing academic work that more closely suits your personal and professional needs. On discussion days we will read and discuss a select survey of essays that have challenged the intellectual and rhetorical norms of the day in order to develop our own understanding of the form, and then on workshop days read and discuss your own essays. The course aims to teach you how to read closely and attentively, asking: What are the best criteria for judging this piece and what signals do we encounter in the text that makes us know? Students will be expected to offer one twenty-minute presentation on the day's assigned readings, to write two essays to be distributed to the class for our workshop sessions, to turn in careful written comments on classmates' essays workshop days, and to revise one of their essays according to the received comments for their final project. Reading list will include essays by Gloria Anzaldua, James Baldwin, Roland Barthes, Walter Benjamin, John Berger, Jorge Luis Borges, Helene Cixous, Assia Djebar, Frantz Fanon, bell hooks, Trinh T. Minh-ha, Adrienne Rich, Edward Said, as well as comments on the form by Theodor Adorno, Georg Lukacs, Hassan Melehy, and Nancy K. Miller.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 791. Seminar in Literary Theory.

Section 001 — Literature & Empire.

Instructor(s): Lydia Liu (lydialiu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/complit/791/001.nsf

This course will explore the ground of comparative work in contemporary theory and recent scholarship. It also serves as an introduction to poststructuralism, postcolonial theory, critical translation studies, and new empire studies. Our readings center on the questions of imperial adventure, cultural translation, the figuring of the other, the terror of self-knowledge, and symbolic exchange in general. We will examine, for example, how "value" functions in linguistic and economic exchange and explore the relevance of this concept to the theories of language and power. Topics of discussion include fetishism, race, difference, sovereignty, intersubjectivity, and the claims of commensurability or incommensurability in a global network of signifying systems. Work in this seminar consists of active class participation in weekly discussions, individual oral presentation, and short written assignments on selected readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

COMPLIT 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for COMPLIT.


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This page was created at 6:24 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.


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