College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in English


This page was created at 6:17 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


ENGLISH 401 / RELIGION 481. The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I.

Section 001 — This course no longer satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse.

Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm, and a final. Class attendance and participation essential.

This course no longer fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 — Children's literature.

Instructor(s): Lisa Makman (lmakman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the major genres of children's literature. Students will read from a wide variety of classical and contemporary works, from The Tale of Peter Rabbit to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. The genres we will study include fairytales, historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction. The course will cultivate an awareness of story patterns, generic conventions, and innovations. Among the topics to be considered are conceptions of child's play, gender and the child's development, imagining the child's imagination, sense and nonsense, and coming of age. The course will also examine broader questions such as the following. What are possible pedagogical functions of literature for children? What meanings are given to childhood in our culture and what is the role played by children's literature in producing these meanings? How have the meanings given to childhood changed historically?

Requirements: response papers, final exam and research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 002 — Filipino American Literature. Meets with AMCULT 311.001.

Instructor(s): Emily P Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu), Maria S See (ssee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/311/001.nsf

See AMCULT 311.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 005 — West African Novel in English.

Instructor(s): Jennifer A Wenzel (jawenzel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/407/005.nsf

Chinua Achebe has often been called the "father of African literature," both for his 1958 novel Things Fall Apart, and for his infrastructural efforts to create opportunities for other writers. Part of the appeal of Things Fall Apart derived from its appearance shortly before Nigerian independence in 1960, during the optimistic decade of African decolonization. Yet to posit a postcolonial origin for African literature is to ignore not only oral and written traditions in indigenous African languages, but also a centuries-long tradition of African writing in English, including that of early 20th -entury West African nationalists. While our primary focus will be on mid-to-late 20th-century novels in English by authors from Nigeria and Ghana, we will resist reading them merely as Achebe's "progeny." Instead, supplementary readings in other genres (e.g., the autobiography of Olaudah Equiano; popular "market" literatures) and translations from other languages (e.g., the fantastic Yoruba-language fiction of D.O. Fagunwa) will help to suggest a range of possible relationships among these texts. We will consider the implications of reading within the rubrics of national, regional, continental, or global literatures, as well as the resonances and tensions between the concerns of these texts and those of postcolonial theory. Questions of distribution and reception, including the respective constraints of African and international publishing, will also be relevant to our discussion. Course requirements will include short essays and at least one exam.

Major texts likely to be drawn from the following:

  • Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart
  • Aidoo, Ama Ata. Our Sister Killjoy
  • Armah, Ayi Kwei. The Beautyful Ones Are Not Yet Born
  • Awoonor, Kofi. Comes the Voyager at Last: A Tale of Return to Africa
  • Balogun, F. Odun. Adjusted Lives: Stories of Structural Adjustment
  • Emecheta, Buchi. The Joys of Motherhood
  • King-Aribisala, Karen. Kicking Tongues
  • Nwapa, Flora. Women Are Different
  • Okri, Ben. The Famished Road
  • Saro-Wiwa, Ken. Sozaboy
  • Soyinka, Wole. The Interpreters
  • Tutuola, Amos. The Palm-wine Drinkard
  • Photocopied packet of literary, historical, theoretical supplementary readings

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 006 — War and the American Writer.

Instructor(s): John H McGuigan (jhmcguig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

American culture was profoundly shaped during the 1900s by a series of new wars creating new conditions both for soldiers on the fronts and civilians at home. Starting from that rather obvious premise, this course explores the "how" and "why." The shocking scale and mechanization of World War I, costly non-intervention in the Spanish Civil War and the resulting necessity of World War II, the forgotten Korean War, the domestically divisive Vietnam conflict, the restorative Desert Storm — each conflict abroad necessitated a renegotiated sense of self at home. Many of the art works we will study define themselves in opposition to the respective official government line, but through the use of primary sources we will examine both sides of the domestic battle for the cultural and rhetorical upper-hand, as people fight to determine how a conflict will be understood and how it will be remembered. Soldiers' letters, for example, can illuminate the role art played in the lives of soldiers, helping them negotiate the danger of their immediate environment and inform their sense of the larger historical and political forces at work.

This course requires two shorter papers, a reading journal, and a 10pp research project using University research collections. Readings could include works by Crane, Cather, Faulkner, Hemingway, H.D., Dos Passos, Vonnegut, Mailer, O'Brien, Komunyakaa, and Bowden, in addition to films and journalism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 408 / LING 408. Varieties of English.

Section 001 — Early Middle English Texts. Satisfies the Pre-1600 Literature requirement for English concentrators. Meets with ENGLISH 503.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This term we will examine (often with the aid of parallel translations) works in early Middle English, as well as the better known and more frequently studied major authors — Chaucer, Gower, Piers, the Pearl poet. Readings will include selections from prose and poetic histories, mystical writers; contemporary social and political documents (laws, recipes, medical texts, chronicles, charters). We will examine a wide range of early Middle English texts as we develop an appreciation for the roles written English played in medieval England and the cultural and political consequences of the ability to read and write. [Although this course follows up on material covered in ENGLISH 407 (reading Old English), ENGLISH 407 is not a prerequisite.]

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001 — The Writing of Kinetic Poetry.

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In writing poems this academic term, there will be an emphasis on gestures to compensate for what so far is necessarily lost in the translation of experience into poetry, beginning with a consideration of the loss of the three-dimensionality of experience as it is made to conform to the two-dimensionality of the page. For poetic structures, we will therefore attempt to utilize the structures of polyhedra, foam, fractals, and whatever other structures can assist us in giving shape to experience, to help us create more locations for poems to progress in both space and time. We will further draw upon various forms of kinetic typography that can help us liberate not only the writing of our poems, but also the display of our poems from strictly linear and 2D representation. Through the use of such software as Illustrator, Powerpoint, and Flash, we will become more able to access the three dimensionality of experience in our poems, We will be concerned with what lies on the planes opposite, under, beside, above, below, etc. the emotional, physical, logistical, tonal, momentary, etc. locations of the subjects and ideas in our poems. And we will also consider how what we place on these planes can vary as scale and time are varied. The understanding in this course will be that interactions define kinetic systems, and that existence, the overall source of our poetry, is itself a kinetic system. The academic term will culminate with a display of our kinetic poetry. Please join me in this experiment. Texts will probably include but are not limited to: Platonic and Archimedean Solids by Daud Sutton, Garbage by A. R. Ammons, Fractals: The Patterns of Chaos by John Briggs, Asylum by Quan Barry.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor/department

ENGLISH 432. The American Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregg Crane

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will focus on the 'reversal of fortunes' story as a way of exposing the main features and development of the American novel. Our reading will be drawn from a long list of reversal tales, such as Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography, Washington Irving's "Rip Van Winkle," Frederick Douglass' Narrative, Herman Melville's "Benito Cereno," Lydia Maria Child's Hobomok and Romance of the Republic, Horatio Alger's Ragged Dick, William Dean Howells' Rise of Silas Lapham, Frances Harper's Iola Leroy, Gertrude Dorsey Brown's "A Case of Measure for Measure," James Weldon Johnson's Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man, Abraham Cahan's The Rise of David Levinsky, and George Schuyler's Black No More. In some of these stories, reversals of fortune prove to be superficial, leaving aesthetic and ethical values untouched, but, in others, such changes result in a transformation of important principles and ideals. Perhaps most interesting are the narratives which simultaneously assert and deny the connection between change and value. As we look at narrative representations of the value of change and change of value, we will study shifts in novelistic form, closely comparing the figurations of change in sentimental, realist, naturalist, and modernist fiction. Writing assignments will include a midterm and final, reading quizzes, and one or two short (4-5 pp.) papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson (johnaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine developments in English fiction from the turn of the twentieth century to mid-1941. We will explore the ways in which the twentieth-century novel, rather than being driven primarily by plot, attempts to trace, in Joyce's words, "the curve of an emotion" or to incorporate, as Lawrence desires, philosophy and fiction in the novel. Virginia Woolf tells us that "human nature changed" in the first decade of the 1900s. Certainly the way novelists constructed human nature altered dramatically. We will also discuss issues that might be broadly grouped under the heading "gender": how do men and women in the twentieth century respond to or initiate the radical redefinitions of sex roles that occur during our century? Or are those "radical redefinitions" more rhetorical than substantive? How do anxieties and confusions manifest themselves in the texts we're discussing? We will also pay close attention to the variety of ways each author positions her / himself in relation to a past: how does the modern stand in relation to history? Readings will include a substantial course pack and the following texts: Bennett, The Old Wive's Tale; Stein,Three Lives; Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Lawrence, Women in Love; Woolf, To the Lighthouse and Between the Acts.

Course requirements are three essays (two five-page papers and a final, more substantial essay that's seven to nine pages long). There will be a final exam. This course has discussion sections

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 434. The Contemporary Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ira Konigsberg (ikonigsb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers a broad spectrum of contemporary writers and types of fiction, As well as establishing the specific themes and narrative methods of these literary figures and groups of novels, the course also seeks to discover similar concerns, ideas, and techniques in relation to recent social and cultural developments. The course especially focuses on the possibilities and impossibilities of fiction to deal with social and individual trauma in the real worlds of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The class will read Bernard Malamud's The Assistant, Thomas Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49, Margaret Atwood's Surfacing, Tony Morrison's Sula, V.S. Naipaul's A Bend in the River, D.M. Thomas' The White Hotel, Don Delillo's White Noise, Julian Barnes' A History of the World in 10 1/2 Chapters, and Michael Ondaatje's The English Patient.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 441. Contemporary Poetry.

Section 001 — Contemporary Poetry. Satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine some of the most significant poems and poetry movements in the period 1945-2003. We shall begin by looking at poems about World War II, and then move on to poems of the so-called Confessional school. Sylvia Plath's book Ariel and Ted Hughes' Birthday Letters will be a special focus, as well as work by the Beat Generation poets. We shall study an assortment of "canonical" as well as multicultural poems from the last two decades. The latter part of the course will feature a volume by Frank Bidart, a visiting writer for a weeklong period in winter. One short and one long paper are part of the coursework, as well as a reading journal, a midterm, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 447. Modern Drama.

Section 001 — Churchill and Stoppard.

Instructor(s): Barbara C Hodgdon (hodgdonb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Though they were born just a year apart, Stoppard in 1937 and Churchill in 1938, these two major British playwrights at first seem utterly different. Stoppard seems the witty, allusive, even derivative playwright, entranced alike by literature and philosophy, creating characters who, like those of Oscar Wilde, exist in a world of intelligent conversation rather than a politically committed society. Churchill's writing, by contrast, was at first explicitly political, feminist, and collaborative, growing from her involvement with groups of actors who improvised and workshopped material that she shaped into plays. We will start, therefore, by reading early plays that help to "define" each playwright's practice: Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, Churchill's Light Shining in Buckinghamshire and Vinegar Tom. But then we will try to read these playwrights in tandem, working chronologically through their careers. We will want to consider how both playwrights use historical, literary and dramatic sources; we will look at contexts of the theatre scene for which they wrote, the actors and directors with whom they worked; we also will note how their writing changes focus as well as form and explore their critical reception.

Plays to be read will depend on availability of texts, but will probably include the following: Stoppard's Jumpers, Travesties, Professional Foul, The Real Thing, Arcadia, The Invention of Love, and Churchill's Cloud Nine, Top Girls, Mad Forest, Far Away. Additional required plays: Bertolt Brecht's The Good Woman of Setzuan; Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot.

Class requirements: written questions on plays, active discussion, 3 short papers, and a final project (which may include performed scenes).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 463. Modern British Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/463/001.nsf

This course will survey poetry, fiction, cinema, and drama composed in Britain from 1900 to 1965. Our reading list will include W.H. Auden, Elizabeth Bowen, Daphne DuMaurier, Graham Greene, D.H. Lawrence, George Orwell, Jean Rhys, and Muriel Spark, among others. We will also think about these texts in relation to their historical and social contexts (such as the two World Wars, the rise of the welfare state, and changing class structures and gender roles over this period).

Weekly writing assignments, two essays (5 pages and 10 pages), and two exams will be set for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 465 / MEMS 465. Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales.

Section 001 — Satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Karla T Taylor (kttaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is an anthology of stories varying in style and genre, told by similarly diverse fictional narrators. Including both the stateliness of the Knight's Tale and the ribaldry of the Miller's Tale, it creates a new audience in English for a literature simultaneously playful and serious. We will read most of the Tales, paying attention to the work's qualities as an innovative story collection. Central questions will include: How does the Canterbury Tales address its audience? What is the purpose of its interpretative openness? What relations develop between literary style and social position? We will focus especially on narrative voices and the effects they create in their readers; audio tapes will help us hear these voices in Middle English.

One or two short papers, one longer paper, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 469. Milton.

Section 001 — Satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Michael C Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course, will be devoted to reading closely the poetry and prose of John Milton, England's greatest epic poet, amid the various intellectual and social currents of the seventeenth century. Milton is a writer with whom almost every subsequent generation of English writers has had to deal, for better and worse, and his reputation has fallen and risen as political, social, and aesthetic ideals have changed. Milton's impassioned efforts to address the ills of his day entailed contradictions that are still very much with us: he was a political activist who was willing to endorse authoritarian methods to accomplish liberal goals; he was a devout believer in meritocracy who rarely felt this belief threaten an inherited if incorrigible misogyny; he was the epic narrator of the War in Heaven who felt that military valor had nothing to do with true virtue. Milton also wrote some of the most sublime poetry available in English about the joys of the natural world, about work, about the deeply embodied pleasures of eating and sex, and about human relationships. We will be particularly interested in how Milton's political career reverberates throughout the poetry — the ways, for example, that his experience as a defender of regicide may have influenced his portrait of Satan's rebellion against a resolutely monarchical God. We will also look at how political defeat produced a radically inward reorientation of Milton's ardent political and spiritual aspirations. We will spend the lion's share of our time in an intensive reading of Paradise Lost, but will also read some of the early poetry and prose as well as Samson Agonistes and Paradise Regained.

Requirements include attendance and participation, 2 five-page essays, a midterm, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 470. Early American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 — Satisfies the American Literature and Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer you a broad introduction to the literature and intellectual history of North America from the first Spanish contacts through the period of the Early Republic. We will read, for example, the descriptions of New World nature and peoples by marvelling Spanish and English explorers and conquerors, the impassioned theological expressions of New England, narratives of captivity, conversion, and enslavement that emerged from the often violent crossing of cultures and races throughout the American colonies and around the Atlantic rim, a seduction novel, and the foundational documents surrounding the Revolution. My interest lies not in defining an American character, form or story, but in asking why certain forms emerged or were invoked and altered in response to unique historical situations.

There will be three short papers and an oral presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 — American Adolescence.

Instructor(s): Lisa Makman (lmakman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, students will explore the emergence of contemporary notions of adolescence in nineteenth and twentieth-century American literature and culture. Reading texts from a variety of disciplines, we will discuss ways in which conceptions of youth have changed since adolescence was first defined as a developmental stage, and we will consider factors that have conditioned these shifts. Topics to be discussed include sex and gender, working class culture, "identity crisis," rites-of-passage, and young adult literature. We will study works by writers such as Mark Twain, J.D. Salinger, Susan E. Hinton, Maya Angelou, and Sandra Cisneros alongside the work of theorists such as G. Stanley Hall, Margaret Mead, Erik Erikson, and Carol Gilligan. Films to be viewed include Rebel without a Cause and American Graffiti.

Requirements: two papers, a midterm, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 478 / CAAS 476. Contemporary Afro-American Literature.

Section 001 — The African American Novel. Satisfies the New Traditions and the American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Arlene Rosemary Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The African American novelist Ralph Ellison wrote "I believe that true novels, even when most pessimistic and bitter, arise out of an impulse to celebrate human life and therefore are ritualistic and ceremonial at their core. Thus they would preserve as they destroy, affirm as they reject." This course explores the African American novel from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, investigating the ways in which these works "preserve as they destroy, affirm as they reject" aspects of the genre and its sub-categories (e.g., the Bildungsroman). As we examine the formal and thematic elements of the novels, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which Black folk culture, music, religious practices, and popular culture make their way into literary works. Some familiarity with African American literature and history will be beneficial to students enrolling in this course.

Course requirements include two papers and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 — William Carlos Williams.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will study the life, ideas, and literary works of William Carlos Williams, one of the most original and influential of the great American modernist writers. Williams is primarily known for his free verse lyric poetry, so we will spend most of our time on this work (The Collected Poems of William Carlos Williams, Volumes I and II); but we will also study Williams' work in other genres — his epic poem (Paterson ), his imaginative historiography (In the American Grain), his prose improvisations (Kora in Hell), his short stories (The Collected Stories of William Carlos Williams), his plays (Many Loves & Other Plays), and one of his novels (e.g., A Voyage to Pagany ). For help with his ideas, we will read his essays (The Selected Essays of William Carlos Williams ). For his life we will read Paul Mariani's biography (William Carlos Williams: A New World Naked ) and Williams' own account in his autobiography (The Autobiography of William Carlos Williams).

Requirements for the course will be a midterm exam on Williams' life, ideas, and artistic techniques; a short paper (5 pages) on an individual work; and a longer research paper (15-20 pages) on a more general issue in Williams' literary production as a whole.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 — Buddhism & Romanticism. Meets with COMPLIT 490.001.

Instructor(s): Santiago Colas (scolas@umich.edu), Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See COMPLIT 490.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 003 — Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years. Meets with RUSSIAN 479.001.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 005 — James Joyce.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson (johnaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a course for students who desire to be part of an intensely focused group of readers that will work its way through what has repeatedly been called the greatest novel of the twentieth century: James Joyce's Ulysses. As I trust we will all discover, Ulysses is a book that is best read in such a group. And though Ulysses will constitute the central object of our study, this course will challenge and reward you with an exploration of a great deal of Joyce's prose, including Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist, and selected poetry and essays as well. At the end of the term, we will make several brief excursions into Finnegans Wake. We will supplement our investigation of Joyce's novels with readings from a course pack containing essays (by Joyce and his critics) and excerpts from books on Joyce. The course pack should assist you in understanding the novels; it will also comprise a sampling of the enormous diversity of interpretive approaches that Joyce's work has inspired. We will spend some time studying the interpretive history that frames Joyce's prose.

Course requirements will include three essays (two five-page papers and a final, more substantial essay that's about ten pages long). Students will be responsible for generating discussion questions for the class on a course email group. The course will conclude with an unforgettable final exam. Class participation is crucial: this is not a lecture course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 006 — Morrison and Baldwin. Satisfies the New Traditions and the American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Michele L Simms-Burton (mlsimms@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the novels of Toni Morrison and James Baldwin, and how their similarities and differences merge to create a rich tapestry of literature in the American and African American literary tradition. The course will question the extent to which Baldwin's narratives influence Morrison's writings. The following novels will be read: Song of Solomon, Beloved, Jazz, and Paradise, Go Tell It on the Mountain, Giovanni's Room, If Beale Street Could Talk, and Sonny's Blues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 483. Great Works of Literature.

Section 001 — Primo Levi and the Memory of Auschwitz. (Drop/Add deadline=January 26).

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Primo Levi was a Jew from Torino who survived for nearly a year in Auschwitz. His books, which deal recurrently with this experience, arguably constitute one of the major moral and stylistic projects of the twentieth century. In this course we will discuss five of them: Survival at Auschwitz, The Reawakening, The Monkey's Wrench, The Periodic Table, and The Drowned and The Saved. We will also read selections from his poems. We will examine in particular his understanding of the role of memory and remembering in constituting social experience, and observe the ways in which he confronts the problem of writing about the unspeakable.

Coursework includes several brief reading reporst (2 pages each)and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 — Theories of Tragedy & The Tragedies of Theory.

Instructor(s): Vivasvan Soni (vivasvan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/484/001.nsf

Tragedy is one of the oldest literary genres, with its roots in the democratic experiments of ancient Greece. Yet it also remains one of the most important literary genres today. Not only does it inform aesthetic production of all kinds, from movies to theater to novels, but it also shapes the way we perceive our world. We speak of a tragic life or a tragic event just as we speak of a tragic film, and the way in which we interpret "tragic" in each case transforms our perception of lived reality. At its most basic, tragedy wrestles with some of the fundamental problems of human existence: the meaning of suffering, our ethical response to suffering, our possibilities for happiness. In addition, tragedy is one of the most explicitly politicized literary genres, both formally and in terms of its thematic content. Thematically, tragedies themselves are often concerned with the relation between the individual and the community and the reciprocal responsibilities of that relationship. Formally, since tragedy is a communal ritual, the very experience of watching tragedy is a political one. Yet theories of tragedy have conceived the political possibilities of tragedy very differently, from those who find in it a nascent democratic sensibility, to those who see it as the expression of an aristocratic high culture.

In this class, we will read both classical and contemporary theories of tragedy, paying close attention to the changing ways in which theorists have understood the ethical and political value of tragedy. Not only will we develop a more sophisticated understanding of an important literary genre, but we will also acquire a familiarity with a variety of critical approaches to literature and learn how each one addresses literary problems differently. We will read some of the most important texts in the history of literary criticism (Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Poetics, Nietzsche's Birth of Tragedy ), and explore a variety of contemporary theories, such as Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis, structuralism, postcolonial theory.

Here are some of the questions we will seek to answer by examining theories of tragedy: How does ancient tragedy differ from modern tragedy, and how is individual subjectivity conceived differently as a result? Why does tragedy come to serve as a model for modern psychological subjectivity? What is the political function of Greek tragedy, and how does this change in the modern state? Why does the tragic hero function as a model of political resistance to established norms? What are the different ways in which tragedies place ethical demands on us? Why is tragedy so much better suited to understanding complex ethical situations than moral philosophy is?

It is my hope that through this class we will become attuned to the political and social relevance of literary texts, and we will learn to be attentive to the subtle ways in which literary paradigms determine our own ethical and political responses to our world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 486. History of Criticism.

Section 001 — Post-Colonial Theory: An Introduction.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Post-colonial theory brings dramatically various resources to bear on investigating the effects of European colonialism across the globe. How was colonial power exerted? How may we discern indigenous voices within colonial contexts? And how may we best conceive the manifold dilemmas of identity that continue to trouble once-colonized peoples, dilemmas that impinge on ideas of individuality, nation, religion, gender and more? Presuming no prior study in theory, this course surveys several forms of general theory — notably feminism, Marxism, psychoanalysis and deconstruction — to put us all into a position of strength when reckoning with the diversity of postcolonial approaches themselves. Our theory readings range back at least to Edward Said's 1978 work Orientalism and extend up to the present. Very active in-class engagement is expected; assignment structure is likely to be exam-heavy, with a paper option.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 496. Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair (sbblair@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course meets once a week for an hour. It is designed to help the cohort of thesis writers with the kind of problems that are likely to arise in the late phases of thesis composition. While ENGLISH 496 is a comparatively informal continuation of ENGLISH 492, students are required to attend these sessions. The course is taught by a number of the faculty working in the Honors program, who take turns guiding each week's meeting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 503. Middle English.

Section 001 — Early Middle English Texts. Meets with ENGLISH 408.001 and LING 408.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 506. Structure of English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard W Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/506/001.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 535. Contemporary Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 540. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 002 — Gender and Black (Trans) National Identity in the 19th Century: Approaches to Studying the African Diaspora. [3 credits]. Meets with AMCULT 510.001 & CAAS 558.001 and INSTHUM 511.003.

Instructor(s): Sandra R Gunning (sgunning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See INSTHUM 511.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 547. Literature of the Victorian Period.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martha J Vicinus (vicinus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 552. Nineteenth Century American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kerry C Larson

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 572. Workshop in Writing Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter Ho Davies (phdavies@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only. ENGLISH 571. Permission of instructor required. (6). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 575. Workshop in Writing Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard W Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; ENGLISH 574. Permission of instructor required. (6). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 577. Independent Study-Creative Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In lieu of the workshop, fourth-term MFA students receive six hours of independent study credit to enable them to concentrate on completion of the thesis project. Theses consist of a substantial body of poems, short stories, or portions of a novel.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 578. Creative Writing-Fiction.

Section 001 — Strategies in Prose.

Instructor(s): Delbanco

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 579. Creative Writing-Poetry.

Section 001 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Richard W Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 590. Independent Study for M.A. Students.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, English and Education, or Women's Studies, and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 627. Critical Theories and Cross-Cultural Literature.

Section 001 — Topic?

Instructor(s): White

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 627. Critical Theories and Cross-Cultural Literature.

Section 002 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Smith

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/department

ENGLISH 651. Topics in Colonial and Republican American Literature.

Section 001 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 668. Studies in American Authors.

Section 001 — The Native American Literary and Political Renaissance. Meets with AMCULT 699.003.

Instructor(s): Betty L Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be elected up to eight times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See AMCULT 699.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 675. Creative Writing Project — Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; ENGLISH 571 or 574. Permission of instructor required. (6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

One academic term of independent work on completion of the thesis for the MFA. Students receive six hours of independent study credit to enable them to concentrate on completion of the thesis project. Theses consist of a substantial body of poems, short stories, or portions of a novel.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 675. Creative Writing Project — Thesis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Peter Ho Davies (phdavies@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; ENGLISH 571 or 574. Permission of instructor required. (6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

One academic term of independent work on completion of the thesis for the MFA. Students receive six hours of independent study credit to enable them to concentrate on completion of the thesis project. Theses consist of a substantial body of poems, short stories, or portions of a novel.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 678. Language and the Uses of Literacy.

Section 001 — Rhetorical Theory and Discourses of Social Change. Meets with AMCULT 699.005 and HISTORY 698.006.

Instructor(s): Alisse Suzanne Portnoy

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 832. Seminar: The Study of Genre.

Section 001 — The Renaissance History Play.

Instructor(s): Linda K Gregerson (gregerso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/832/001.nsf

"The recognition of anachronism," writes Phyllis Rackin, "was a basic premise of Reformation thought." And nowhere was this recognition more conspicuously explored than in the history plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. In the sixteenth century history play, we behold not merely the discovery of sudden or progressive change over time but the simultaneous triggering — in a single place at a single time and among a single group of people or even within a single mind — of contradictory understandings grounded in historical discontinuity. Market-driven, unevenly regulated by local and centralized authorities, catering to a fickle and heterogeneous audience, theatrical performance in this period was an instrument ready-made for the investigation of cognitive dissonance; in the history play it found one of its most distinctive — and dangerous — sites for innovation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 842. Seminar: An Historical Period.

Section 001 — Late Medieval Literature.

Instructor(s): Karla T Taylor (sanok@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 842. Seminar: An Historical Period.

Section 002 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Xiomara A Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 992. Directed Study for Doctoral Students/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Must have a GSI Award. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Undergraduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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