College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Film and Video Studies


This page was created at 6:21 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


FILMVID 400. Filmmaking II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Hardacker (hardacke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 300 or equivalent experience in filmmaking and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an advanced 16mm motion picture production course. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with dramatic film production from interpreting the screenplay through shooting, editing, and post-production. The relationship of these activities to aesthetic development being the fundament of the course, and the basis of its connection to film studies. You will have access to a state-of-the-art Panaflex 16mm camera in addition to standard production equipment. Students work in small groups to produce a substantial sync-sound final project, as well as participating in a large in-class dramatic production (collaboration with Theater and Drama students). Evaluation: participation in in-class projects, production assignments, final project.

Text: Pincus and Ascher, Filmmaker's Handbook.

Students registering for this course must come by the Film/Video main office to fill out an in-house waitlist form.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FILMVID 402. Television Studio II.

Section 001 — The Television Sitcom, Students must also concurrently enroll in FILMVID 366.010 this term.

Instructor(s): Terri L Sarris (tsarris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 302 and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course is designed to enable you to historically and culturally contextualize particular televisual texts both critically and creatively. The course will be divided into four units: each of which will focus upon the evolution and intransigence of a particular subgenre of the situation comedy. The studies component of each unit will involve the examination of the domestic, the social, the ensemble and the act-based sitcoms, respectively, in terms of how they reflect and refract contemporary American popular culture, their representations of race, gender, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation as well as their popular and critical reception.

The writing component of the unit will build upon the critical examination by incorporating the analysis of the dramatic structure of the texts as well as efforts to replicate and/or revise the approaches used by writing staffs for the selected series.

Finally, the production component will allow you to actually direct and produce a scene from a sitcom; utilizing your knowledge of the critical and creative processes as well as continuing instruction an television production.

*Please note, students in FILMVID 402.001 must also enroll in FILMVID 366.010 this term. A waitlist form must be filled out in the main office, 2512 Frieze Bldg.

The course will meet in the LS&A Television Studio, located at 400 Fourth Street. Students should plan their schedules to allow for travel time.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FILMVID 404. Interdisciplinary Collaborations in Visual Media.

Section 001 — Collaboration in the New Media. [3 credits]. Meets with PAT 442.001, INSTHUM 411.001, ARTDES 454.001.

Instructor(s): Christopher E McNamara (mcnamart@umich.edu), Andrew Jay Kirschner

Prerequisites: A 300- (or 400-) level production course in the relevant emphasized area: FILMVID 300, 301, 302, or 306; and permission of instructor. (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (1-3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/pat/442/001.nsf

See INSTHUM 411.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor/department

FILMVID 410. Screenwriting II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James S Burnstein

Prerequisites: FILMVID 310. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will learn to cast a critical eye on their own first drafts by analyzing other class members' screenplays. Working in teams, students will break down screenplays in terms of structure, story logic, character development, character relationships, dialogue, visuals, and theme. Using feedback from their fellow students and instructor, students will strive to fix the problems in their own individual screenplays. A major rewrite and polish will be required.

Please note: A maximum of twenty students will be admitted to this course. Students will be selected based on the quality of their original screenplays and/or their Screenwriting I instructor's recommendation. Other factors being equal, preference will be given to senior concentrators in Film and Video Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 414. Film Theory and Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Johannes Eugen von Moltke (moltke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is primarily a reading course designed to provide the student with an overview of how people through the twentieth century have thought about film. Theories of cinema offer a philosophical approach to understanding film as an art form. Starting with Hugo Munsterberg and Vachel Lindsay in the 1910s, students will read a wide range of theoretical approaches as they proceed through this 100 year history.

We will compare and contrast the viewpoints of influential thinkers on film such as Eisenstein and Bazin, as well as analyze recent commentary that takes up questions regarding film as a representation of culture, as a medium for narrating stories, as a source of psychological fascination, and as a technologically unique process. This course is required for concentrators in the program, but is open to all students with some background in film. Requirements include several papers and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 414. Film Theory and Criticism.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Lucia A Saks (lsaks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/filmvid/414/003.nsf

Students are acquainted with the canonical texts of film theory, dating from the silent period up to the latest developments in multicultural and postmodern theory. The goal is both a familiarity with key concepts and terminology, and the improvement of student's analytic abilities as they approach film from the point of view of philosophy and social theory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 441. National Cinemas.

Section 001 — French Cinema.

Instructor(s): Richard Abel (richabel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 360. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers a survey of French Cinema from the Lumières in the 1890s and the Pathe-Freres' brief world dominance in the 1900s through a variety of commercial and artistic renewals (in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1960s) to the embattled period of the 1980s and 1990s. Several weeks at the beginning of the course will be synchronized with a special series of 1920s French films restored by the Cinémathèque Française and shown at the Michigan Theater.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 441. National Cinemas.

Section 003 — Nordic Cinema.

Instructor(s): Hubert I Cohen (hicohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 360. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Nordic National Cinemas will study the history of film production in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and especially Sweden, examining the social and political context and domestic audience in each country. We will trace the development of these cinemas from their origins to the golden years of film-making in the 1920s and 1930s, to film production and censorship during WWII, to the new-realism of the 1950s and 1960s, and up through the internationally successful films of recent years, noting along the way the influence of American cinema. We will focus on the most famous films of such internationally-recognized film-makers as Mauritz Stiller, Victor Sjöstrom, Carl Dreyer, Ingmar Bergman, Billie August, and Lars von Trier, as well as some nationally important film-makers such as Gustaf Molander, Gabriel Axel, Aki Kaurismaki. We will stress the idea that Nordic cinema is the cinema of five different national traditions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 460. Technology and the Moving Image.

Section 001 — Color in Film: History, Theory & Criticism.

Instructor(s): Brian Edwards Price (pricebe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the various ways in which technology has shaped the art forms of the moving image. The course traces the impact of such innovations as sound, color, and wide screen on the history of the motion picture, virtual reality, and multi-media performances. As well as studying the aesthetics of technology, this course examines the ways in which technology through art influences individual psychology and society at large.

To consider these elements motivating our future media environments, students will read a diverse range of scholars' and artists' writings and examine numerous examples of digital media as well as watch weekly film screenings. Readings and screenings will highlight historical precedents of recent developments, and examine key debates in the direction of immersive environments. By the end of the academic term, students should be able to analyze moving image production from a number of complementary points of view, all aimed at locating innovation, critical rigor, and artistic excellence in the art-technological work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 485. The Global Screen.

Section 001 — Circumnavigating the Atlantic: Cinema, Exile & Diaspora. Meets with AMCULT 498.002.

Instructor(s): Lucia A Saks (lsaks@umich.edu), Catherine Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 230 or 236 and one of: FILMVID 360, 441, 440, 442, CAAS 400, 442. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/filmvid/485/001.nsf

This course will explore transnational trends in cinematic representation by focusing on films made in different locations in, and between the territories lining the Atlantic Ocean. Co-productions between European, American, and African nations will be considered, as will films addressing the subject of exile, migration, and (post)colonial relations. The impact of movement and exchange on the construction of gendered, racial, and ethnic identities, as well as on filmmaking strategies, aesthetics, and audience reception will receive particular attention. Special screenings of new work by African and Black diasporic filmmakers will be accompanied by guest lectures.

Prior enrollment in AMCULT 351: Race and American Cinema or FIMVID 360 World Cinema recommended, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 500. Directed Study in Film and Video.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced course permitting intensive study of film and/or video subject under supervision of a Film/Video faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FILMVID 600. Seminar in Film Theory.

Section 001 — Space, Time, and Cinema: Architecture, Urbanism, and the Filmic Constructions of Modernity.

Instructor(s): Edward Dimendberg (eddimend@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 414 and Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore the intersections of film theory with modern architecture and urbanism through the study of exemplary theoretical texts and practitioners including Dziga Vertov, Le Corbusier, Jacques Tati, Jean-Luc Godard, Walter Benjamin, Siegfried Kracauer, Guy Debord, Joseph von Sternberg, Robert Venturi, Michel Foucault, Anne Friedberg, Rem Koolhaas, and David Cronenberg. Questions of modernism, postmodernism, surveillance, transparency, cyberspace, and changes in the built environment since the end of WWII will be investigated through close analyses of theoretical texts and films. Seminar requirements include regular participation in discussions, direction of one seminar meeting, and a final research project. Enrollment restricted to graduate students with preference to those in the Film and Video Studies Certificate program or the College of Architecture and Urban Planning.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 601. Seminar in Film Historiography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Abel (richabel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 350 and 360, and Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is devoted to film historiography, focused specifically on silent cinema. That is, we will be engaged in discussing questions and issues concerned with what it means to "do film history," in the past as well as the present. We will be reading theoretical works on available methodologies of research, recent analyses and arguments about particular facets of silent cinema, and past histories for their changing conceptions of silent cinema. We also will be researching the trade press (and other contemporaneous sources) to track cinema's early development as a major entertainment industry as well as a mass culture practice. In order to make the course work as specific as possible, we will take up several case studies focused on readings linked to individual films.

The course is organized into four major sections or units. After an initial class session introducing a range of questions and issues, we will devote three weeks to exploring a broad range of methods and materials and another three weeks to case studies involving American films from the 1910s and 1920s. After winter break, we will take another three weeks to do case studies involving French films from the same period. The last four weeks will be devoted to individual or collaborative projects based on specific interests developed during the course.

For each of the three major sections, students will make presentations focused on the readings and film screenings to facilitate class discussion; these presentations can form the basis for the writing assignment due at the conclusion of each section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 604. Directed Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. FILMVID 600 and 601, permission of advisor and F&V Graduate Committee. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A minimum of three hours of directed research in film studies is required of all Certificate students. Every student is required to carry out a research project in film studies that represents the culmination of their Certificate studies. This written project will be based on individual reading and screening lists. Students who choose to write a dissertation which incorporates film to a significant degree are encouraged to use this directed research as preparation. In this case, the research project may take the form of a chapter of the dissertation, but the project is expected to vary according to the individual student. The directed research must be approved by the student's Certificate faculty advisor, the advisor in the home unit, and the Film & Video Studies Graduate Committee.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


Undergraduate Course Listings for FILMVID.


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This page was created at 6:21 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.


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