College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in French


This page was created at 6:22 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


FRENCH 414. Advanced Business French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 — Meets with BA 415.001 and BA 415.451.

Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FRENCH 380. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in BA 415.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During this class, we will deepen our linguistic and cultural awareness of the French-speaking business world. We will study and practice both written and spoken commercial French within their true cultural context. Themes covered during the semester will include banking, advertising, product marketing, claims and disputes, company organization and hierarchy. The mechanics of job application in French will be covered in detail, as will possible scenarios encountered once accepted into a company. Required writing assignments will concentrate on commercial correspondence, stressing the traditional nature of written business French. Oral work will include the practice of communication and integration in both formal and social business settings.

A series of business culture videos will be viewed and used as a springboard for discussion regarding the differences (both perceived and real) between business interactions in the francophone world and the U.S.

Required Texts:

  • Parlons Affaires
  • Le Français Commercial

This class is conducted entirely in French. Attendance is mandatory. No auditors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 453 / HISTART 464. Interdisciplinary Topics in French Art, Literature, and Culture.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 001 — Figuring the Artist in Nineteenth-Century France. Taught in English, but knowledge of French is desirable. Meets with FRENCH 660.001 and HISTART 771.001.

Instructor(s): Michèle A Hannoosh (hannoosh@umich.edu) , Susan L Siegfried (siegfrie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. Taught in English. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/french/453/001.nsf

As nineteenth-century artists and critics became ever more self-conscious about artistic subjectivity, the visual artist emerged as an important character in novels by Balzac, Flaubert, the Goncourts, Zola and others, becoming the repository of literary fantasies and anxieties about individual creativity. This interdisciplinary course will study the artist as a social and literary phenomenon in early and mid-nineteenth century France.

The involvement of critics and writers in shaping artistic personae will be another major theme, as critics contributed to the public staging of an artist and in turn influenced artists' conceptions of their own work. We will study paintings and texts that took their audiences "inside" the artist's private world through eyewitness accounts, portraits, and images of the studio and other artistic milieux. These popularized images of artistic personalities and spaces will be compared with their fictionalized representations in novels of the period.

This course will be taught in English, but knowledge of French is desirable.

Graduate students interested in this course who wish to enroll under a graduate-level number may enroll in either FRENCH 660.001 or HISTART 771.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 601. Proseminar in French.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peggy S McCracken (peggymcc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This one-hour course meets weekly by appointment for practice in the reading and interpretation of Old French texts. Enrollment is by consent of instructor only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 652. Studies in 16th-Century French Literature.

Section 001 — Montaigne.

Instructor(s): George P Hoffmann (georgeh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/french/652/001.nsf

Comprehensive introduction to the Essais. Approaches will include intellectual history, social history, history of philosophy and logic, philology, material bibliography, and biography. Montaigne, Essais (3 vols.); Étienne de La Boétie, Discours de la servitude volontaire.

Language in which course will be conducted to be determined by shared consent; two papers, discussion board, visit to Special collections, joint lecture by two visiting scholars.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 653. Studies in 17th-Century French Literature.

Section 001 — Lying and Literature in the Seventeenth Century.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Ibbett (ibbett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In early modern Europe, writers on politics often tackle the legitimacy of lying, asking whether lying in public life can ever be justified, and if so, how and when the lie should be employed. In France, this material on the ethical and political status of dissimulation coincides with an intensified discussion of "lying" in literary practice. The classic literary debates of the French seventeenth century — about vraisemblance, about plagiarism and imitation, about the status of history in fiction — echo the concerns of political writers, and pose questions such as: What can and should a writer say? How may he alter a source text? Can he dissemble or disguise something that did happen, or should have happened? In short, is the writer allowed to lie?

This seminar will examine the meeting of the literary and political discourses on dissimulation. We will look at the representation of lying, spying, and all things secret in the literature of the period, and ask how the lie functions differently in different genres. We will also consider how the relation between political debates and debates about the status of fiction might affect the development of a "literary sphere."

Texts to purchase:

  • Corneille, Le Cid, Rodogune, Nicomède
  • Molière, Tartuffe
  • Racine, Bajazet, Brittanicus
  • Lafayette, La princesse de Clèves
  • La Bruyère, Les caractères
  • Pascal, Les provinciales
  • Machiavelli, The Prince

The course pack will include readings from Montaigne, Lipsius, Botero, Grotius, Naudé, Chapelain, Barbeyrac and Kant, as well as more recent readings by Marin, Foucault, Habermas, Sedgwick and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 660. Topics and Themes in French Literature.

Section 001 — Figuring the Artist in Nineteeth-Century France. Taught in English, but knowledge of French is desirable. [3 credits]. Meets with FRENCH 453.001, HISTART 464.001, and HISTART 771.001.

Instructor(s): Michèle A Hannoosh (hannoosh@umich.edu) , Susan L Siegfried (siegfrie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/french/453/001.nsf

As nineteenth-century artists and critics became ever more self-conscious about artistic subjectivity, the visual artist emerged as an important character in novels by Balzac, Flaubert, the Goncourts, Zola and others, becoming the repository of literary fantasies and anxieties about individual creativity. This interdisciplinary course will study the artist as a social and literary phenomenon in early and mid-nineteenth century France.

The involvement of critics and writers in shaping artistic personae will be another major theme, as critics contributed to the public staging of an artist and in turn influenced artists' conceptions of their own work. We will study paintings and texts that took their audiences "inside" the artist's private world through eyewitness accounts, portraits, and images of the studio and other artistic milieux. These popularized images of artistic personalities and spaces will be compared with their fictionalized representations in novels of the period.

This course will be taught in English, but knowledge of French is desirable.

Graduate students interested in this course who wish to enroll under a graduate-level number may enroll in either FRENCH 660.001 or HISTART 771.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 855. Special Topics Seminar.

Section 001 — American Races, French Cultural Studies: Towards a Comparative Approach to Critical Race Theory.

Instructor(s): Jarrod L Hayes (hayesj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A number of scholars have written convincing accounts of the "invention" of race as a way of historicizing and denaturalizing the racial distinctions so often taken for granted in the U.S. This seminar takes as its starting premise that such a project could be immensely enhanced through comparison with the subtly (or not so subtly) different ways race is instituted in the Francophone world. As language teachers, specialists in French and Francophone studies are fully aware of the pedagogically productive effects of the "culture clash" that occurs in language learning when students are forced to adapt to radically different linguistic structures; one goal of this seminar would be to extend the critical thinking encouraged by such encounters to the idea of race. France's colonial history in the Maghreb, for example, produced racial hierarchies that are often unrecognizable for the American observer unaware of this history. The institution of French slavery, as another example, produced distinctions that cannot be contained by a racial binary such as the Anglo-American one, founded as it is on the one-drop rule.

The goal of this seminar is to foster a dialogue between students of French studies and students of American cultures who will come to the table, so to speak, with different expertises. The resulting conversations will focus on four main sites of inquiry:

  1. texts that constitute the closet French equivalent to what is called critical race theory in the U.S.,
  2. North African immigration in France,
  3. racial distinctions in the French Caribbean, and
  4. conflicts between Franco- and Anglo-American regimes of racial difference in Louisiana history and literature, especially in the nineteenth century.

As its modus operandi, this seminar will leave slightly open the final choice of texts so that students can incorporate their needs and expertise into the syllabus. (An initial proposed reading list follows below, and enough texts will be ordered from Shaman Drum to begin the academic term.) Also, every attempt will be made to select texts that are available in English; a lack of advanced reading proficiency in French need not present an insurmountable obstacle to participating in this seminar. Finally, it may not be necessary for every participant in the seminar to read exactly the same texts. The goal, again, being one of sharing knowledges and readings.

Requirements: class presentations and 25 pages of formal writing. Students have the options of a final term paper or dividing the total pages into several smaller assignments.

Possible reading list:

Colette Guillaumin, Racism, Sexism, Power, and Ideology
Pierre-André Taguieff, The Force of Prejudice: On Racism and Its Doubles
Tahar Ben Jelloun, Racism Explained to My Daughter
K. Anthony Appiah and Amy Gutman, Color Conscious: The Political Morality of Race
Tahar Benn Jelloun, French Hospitality: Racism and North African Immigrants
Paul Smaïl, Vivre me tue (Smile)
Frantz Fanon, Black Skin, White Masks
Mayotte Capécia, I Am a Martiniquan Woman
Raphaël Confiant, Eau de Café
Sidonie de la Houssaye, Octavia la quarteronne
Arnold R. Hirsch and Joseph Logsdon, eds. Creole New Orleans: Race and Americanization
Rodolphe Lucien Desdunes, Our People and Our History: Fifty Creole Portraits
The Black Codes of 1685 and 1724
Plessy v. Ferguson

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 899. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FRENCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FRENCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). Permission of instructor required. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


Undergraduate Course Listings for FRENCH.


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This page was created at 6:22 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.


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