College of LS&A

Winter Academic Term 2004 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in German


This page was created at 6:21 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Astrid Billes Beck (astridb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: GERMAN 325/326. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

GERMAN 426 is devoted to enhance the writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills of advanced students of German. We will use various approaches to improve your proficiency. You are expected to read newspaper articles, stories, and see films, which will serve as a foundation for compositions and discussions. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages, and a subsequent grammatic correction of the composition.

All class members are expected to give a class presentation, and lead a discussion. The final grade is based on the compositions, class presentation, and class participation. German will be used exclusively in this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

Section 002 — Contemporary Literature, Film, and Politics and Journalism. Taught in German.

Instructor(s): Maike Ahrends (ahrm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: GERMAN 325/326. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will be exposed to a variety of styles of written and spoken German in order to improve their reading and listening abilities. Students' abilities to present an argument in writing persuasively and engagingly in German will be substantially improved. To this end, students will be required to do extensive writing, rewriting, and peer editing. One oral presentation is required of each student. The course will focus on Contemporary Literature, Film, and Politics and Journalism. German is used exclusively in this course. The final grade is based on the compositions as well as participation in the discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GERMAN 430 / BA 499. Doing Business in German.

Section 451 — Taught in German. Meets with GERMAN 430.001.

Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: GERMAN 350, or one 300-level courses beyond GERMAN 232. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goals of GERMAN 430 are to increase the level of proficiency in all four areas of German (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) while expanding and expounding on particular topics and areas of interest in the German business world. In addition to becoming more competent in appropriate interactive forms and practices of the German business world, such as forms of communication, organization, and negotiation, students will also delve into such other aspects of German business as business technology, product fairs, partnership in the EU, trade, raw materials and protection of the environment, agriculture, marketing and advertisement, competition, and some very German concepts such as "Mitbestimmung" and "Berufslehre."

This course further develops the student's competence to function both knowledgably and culturally correct in a German business setting. The materials used in the course consist of a course pack, German business texts from major German professional journals and newspapers, German business reports, and videotapes. Short papers and one term research paper will be required, as well as oral reports on findings of the papers and on other topics of interest. The course is conversation-oriented, and will be conducted in German.

This term, GERMAN 430 will also include a two-week unit on producing Power Point business presentations. This unit will be offered through the computer lab in the LRC.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 432 / SOC 425. The German Model: Business, Labor, and the State in the 20th Century.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Jeremy Brooke Straughn (straughn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. Taught in English. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/german/432/001.nsf

In 1945, the German Reich lay in ruin, divided and occupied by its enemies and the moral pariah of Europe. By the 1960s, West Germany had developed a stable democracy, a seamless social welfare system, and the strongest economy in Europe. Meanwhile, East Germany was outperforming nearly every other Communist-led country in its hemisphere. By the 1990s, however, the heyday of the "German Model" seemed to be passing. In this course, we will address such questions as: How can we account for the rise of Modell Deutschland in the 20th century? What are the causes of the strains experienced over the last two decades? What role has reunification played? What conclusions can we draw about treating national cases as "models" to be imitated (or avoided)? This seminar is discussion-format and is designed for juniors and seniors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 455. Nineteenth-Century German Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silke Weineck (smwei@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will read a number of seminal pieces of short prose from the long 19th century (~1780-1910), including selections from Goethe, Kleist, Eichendorff, Droste-Huelshoff, Storm, Kafka, and Thomas Mann. Of special interest will be the development of the novella, a short genre said to be organized around an unerhoerte Begebenheit a rare event of intense symbolic or historical significance. This will allow us to trace changing conceptions of history, transitions, and crises. Readings in German, discussion in German and English. Grades will be based on attendance and participation, written homework assignments, and four short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 457. Twentieth Century German Fiction.

Section 001 — New Women - New Novels. Taught in German.

Instructor(s): Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the role of literature in the history of the German women's movement. Focusing mainly on novels and short stories published in Germany since the end of the 19th century, we will look at the way literary discourses participated in the transformation of gender roles from the 1880s until 1933. By exploring heroines who could bridge the gap between the traditional woman as "angel in the house" and the as yet unrealized New Woman with full citizenship, educational, political, and sexual freedom, women writers came up with representations of femininity that could be both encouraging and disillusioning, and many of which still resonate today. To analyze the role of women's literature in articulating the New Women we will closely look at the texts themselves, as well as at their reception by contemporary feminists, other literary critics, and the growing (female) reading public. Readings, discussions, and writings will be in German; thus, the class will work on improving your spoken and written foreign language skills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 492. German Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frederick R Amrine (amrine@umich.edu), Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior Honors standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

GERMAN 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, GERMAN 491. In GERMAN 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in GERMAN 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 499. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 — Faust. Meets with GERMAN 243.001.

Instructor(s): Frederick R Amrine (amrine@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will begin by tracing the earliest versions of the Faust legend from the late Classical "myth of the Magus" to the sixteenth-century chapbooks. The main focus of the course shall be, however, the four central texts of the tradition: Marlowe's Tragicall History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus; Goethe's Faust, A Tragedy (both Parts); Thomas Mann's Doctor Faustus: The Life of the German Composer Adrian Leverkuhn as Told by a Friend and Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita (tr. Glenny) and the fundamental theological, philosophical, aesthetic, and social issues as they raise. This course is for German concentrators only, who will be required to read Goethe and Mann in the original.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

GERMAN 515. Introduction to Medieval Low German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; open to qualified undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goals of GERMAN 515 are to provide an intensive introduction to the dialects of the northern continental lowlands from around 800 to 1400 AD, namely Old Saxon, Old Low Franconian, Middle Low German and Middle Dutch, with emphasis on Old Saxon; to study the ideological impasse dividing the heathen Germanic world from the Christian Roman world and how this is reflected in the Saxon re-telling of the life of Christ; to explore the problem of sub-grouping among the Germanic dialects of the North Sea area and evaluate the criteria for sub-grouping in light of current theory on language change; and to investigate the socio-economic factors associated with the divergence of Niederdeutsch and Nederlands in the Middle period. An introduction to Old Saxon, as well as edited and unedited texts, maps, charts, diagrams, bibliographies, etc., will be assembled in a course pack (available at Accucopy). Additional sources will be available in the Department's Seminar Library. Readings will include portions of the Old Saxon Heliand, the Old Saxon Genesis, charms and recipes, the Heberregister from the monastery of Freckenhorst, the Old Low Franconian Psalms and Glosses, and a variety of texts from the Middle period. Participants will write a 15-20 page paper, and give several oral presentations in class on topics of their choice. The course is open to undergraduates as well as graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 821. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 — Marx, Weber, and German Political Sociology.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a doctoral seminar devoted to the readings of key texts by Karl Marx, Max Weber, Georg Simmel, Ferdinand Toennies, and Robert Michels. While there have been other important thinkers and writers in Germany as well as elsewhere in Europe and the United States who contributed substantially to the field of political sociology, there can be simply no doubt that the five German writers selected for this seminar have had a decisive influence in the very shaping of the field. With the possible exception of the great French sociologist Émile Durkheim, none have been more essential to the foundation of this epistemology than Karl Marx and Max Weber. Indeed, together with Durkheim, these three writers have commonly been viewed as the "founding fathers" of modern political sociology. As I will delineate in the introductory session of the seminar, our main focus of analysis is to ascertain and debate how these writers saw the essence of modern politics. Toward that end we will read about matters as diverse as class formation, religion, social groups (such as political parties), bureaucracies, authority structures, processes of legitimation and popular participation. We will address key issues that helped form public life in the 20th century. While our examples and discussions will inevitably range well beyond Europe and North America, our focus will primarily rest on countries that belong to the advanced industrial world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 821. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 002 — Sex, Crime, and Culture. Meets with HISTORY 698.004.

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended as a case study in modern European cultural history. The syllabus favors the period around the turn of the nineteenth century and the region of German-speaking central Europe, but we will also be looking at earlier and at more contemporary periods as well as other geographical sites (notably England, France, and America). The questions we will explore concern the transformation in the late nineteenth century of notions of self and society, especially urban society; the ways in which these novel conceptions were concentrated in discourses of crime and sexuality; and, finally, the relationship of these tendencies to the production of modern European culture. We will begin by reading texts that analyze the new urbanism of the period and the association of the city with cultural "decadence." The second topic will be the new sciences of crime and the criminal that are developed in the same period, and the ways in which the criminal emerges as a figure or as a kind of identity. This is linked to the third topic, which will engage knowledges of sexuality and the "problem" of sexual identity. The last topic relates to the association of sexuality and violence in cultural fantasy. Readings in the course will be of three kinds. Roughly half of the books will be secondary sources drawn mainly from history and literary studies. We will also work with theoretical sources, including writings of Foucault and Freud. Finally, we will work with some primary sources drawn from early criminology and sexual science, as well as works of literature. The main requirements of the course are vigorous class participation and a single final paper

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 821. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 003 — Museums and Memory.

Instructor(s): Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on contemporary museum and exhibition cultures in Germany and the USA. The general aim of the course is to explore the present function of the museum within these societies, and to gain an understanding of the process of musealization as a historical and aesthetic phenomenon that renegotiates our relationship to the past in particular, and to temporality in general. The course is organized around a series of case studies that cover four principal sites of contemporary museal activity: Work, Body, Nation, and the Holocaust. We will investigate particular strategies of exhibition around each of these themes, analyzing the specific national, historical, and discursive constellations in which they are embedded. At the same time, we will be looking for recurring motifs, aesthetic configurations, and ideological patterns that emerge from these comparisons. Course work will include readings, discussions, writing projects, lectures, and visits to relevant museums and exhibitions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 822. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 — German Studies Colloquium.

Instructor(s): Johannes Eugen Von Moltke (moltke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GERMAN 841. Seminar: Studies in German Literature.

Section 001 — German Writings on Music. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Vanessa Helen Agnew (vagnew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; or permission of instructor. (2-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Germany is often thought of as a musical nation and Germans as the 'people of music'; German and Austrian composers dominate the classical music tradition, and music theorists and philosophers the intellectual one. By reading a range of sources spanning the late eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries — music travelogues and criticism, and philosophical, historiographical, and ethnomusicological texts — the course explores the ways in which such a nexus may have come about. In reconstructing the discourse on national identity, music and musical thought, we will interrogate 'German music' as an ambiguous, oppositional category: it was defined at different historical points as, for example, not Italian, French, Semitic, or German colonial. Claims about national specificity and universal intelligibility hinged on an engagement with musical difference that often served non-musical ends.

The course thus deals with the controversies over formalism and idealism, high versus low culture, the question of meaning and music's capacity to signify, exoticism, the idea of a colonial discourse of music, and music and race. Authors to be covered include Burney, Reichardt, Forkel, Herder, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Hanslick, Wagner, Hegel, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, Adorno, Krämer, Hornbostel, Weber, Eichenauer, and Blume. In addition to listening to a number of guest speakers, we will attend a series of concerts that complement the readings covered in class. Readings will be in German and English translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 902. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of chair. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

GERMAN 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

GERMAN 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


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